Leeds University Library

COMM1780 - Module Reading List

What's New about New Media and Digital Communications?, 2011/12, Semester 1
Dr Helen Thornham
h.thornham@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Key Texts

Flew, T. (2008) New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge.

Additional reading for each week is generally found in online journals such as Information society, New media and society, Media, culture & society and Convergence. These journals can be accessed, downloaded and printed through the library. Students need to familiarise themselves with this process.

Other useful free access journals: First Monday, www.firstmonday.org FibreCulture, http://www.fibreculturejournal.org GameStudies, http://www.gamestudies.org Ephemera http://www.ephemeraweb.org

The schedule for this module is structured in order to introduce a range of concepts and theories relating to new media in the first 4 weeks before exploring the implications of these concepts in the latter part of the module.

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Week 1. INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 27th September

What is new media? How do we understand it? This week introduces students to the central questions of the module. We touch on a range of new media and introduce a number of terms and concepts we will revisit over the course of the module.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Introduction to New Media’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 1-21 Available as an Online Course Reading in the VLE

Additional Reading:

Silverstone, Roger (1999) What’s New about New Media? New media and society 1(1) pp10-82 also available at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/swiss/archive/Silverstone.pdf

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Week 2. DIGITISATION AND CONVERGENCE 4th October

These two central concepts seem to encapsulate what is new about new media. ‘Digitisation’ speaks to the increase of forms of media, and the easy accessibility of them. ‘Convergence’ seems to explain the merging of different media forms, and the multiple ways they are used and experienced. This week we explore these two concepts, asking what they may reveal, and hide, about new media.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Twenty Key New Media Concepts’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 21-30

Jenkins, Henry (2006) ‘Introduction’ in Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide New York. New York University Press pp1-25

Additional Reading:

Henry Jenkins and Mark Deuze (2008),‘Editorial: Convergence Culture’ in Convergence : the journal of research into new media technologies 14:1 pp5-12

Bassett, Caroline, Hartmann, Maren & O’Riordan, Kate (2008) ‘After Convergence, What Connects? In FibreCulture Journal 13 accessible at http://thirteen.fibreculturejournal.org/

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Week 3. NETWORKS, DATABASES & ARCHIVES 11th October

This week we explore three central concepts: the network, the database, and the archive. They each have been used to explain new media, but each term implies something slightly different. The term ‘network’, for example, explains our seemingly new connected-ness to the world around us. ’Database’ reminds us that this world is constructed, and what we explerience as users, is only a very small, and surface element of this world. Finally, ‘archive’ seems to explain the plethora and depth of stored material available to us.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Twenty Key New Media Concepts’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 30-38

Boyd, D. and Ellison, N. (2007) Social Network Sites: Definition, History and Journal of computer-mediated communication, 13 (1), article 11. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/boyd.ellison.html

Additional Reading:

http://fourteen.fibreculturejournal.org/

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Week 4. NETWORK CULTURES 18th October

Along with networks, are network cultures – the practices and experiences that we engage in when we are ‘networked’. From gaming to social media, from modding to mediation, network cultures refer to the different modes of engagement we now experience with one another, and with the media with which we interact.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Social Networking Media’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 80-106

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘What is the Internet?’ in New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge.pp164 Available online

Additional Reading:

Kennedy, Helen W.(2007) ‘Female Quake Players & the Politics of Identity' in T. Krzywinska & B. Atkins eds. Videogame/Player/Text Manchester University Press pp 120-139 (Also in Giddens, Seth and Lister, Martin (ed) (2011) The new media and technocultures reader London. Routledge pp201-215)

Terranova, Tiziana (2011) ‘Free Labour’ in Giddens, Seth and Lister, Martin (ed) (2011) The new media and technocultures reader London. Routledge pp350-369 (also in her book (2004) Network Cultures: Politics for the Information Age. London. Pluto press AND in the journal (2000) Social text 18:2 pp33-58)

Kücklich, Julian, 2005, ‘Precious Playbour: Modders and the Digital Games Industry’ in Fibreculture 5: http://journal.fibreculture.org/issue5/index.html

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Week 5. CITIZEN JOURNALISM, BLOGGING & THE PUBLIC SPHERE 25th October

Following week 4, the next two weeks explore some of the central issues relating to network cultures. This week we concentrate on the democratic potentials of network cultures. With the advent of digital media, anyone can post comments, upload material and debate. This has spawned a range of claims about new media – from being the new public sphere, to radically changing journalistic practice. We investigate these claims here.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Citizen Journalism’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 143-168

Buchstein, Hubertus (2007) ‘Bytes that Bite: The Internet and Deliberative Democracy’ in Constellations 4:2 pp 248-263

Additional Reading:

Wright, Scott and Street, John (2007) ‘Democracy, deliberation and design: the case of online discussion forums’ in New media and society 9 pp 849-869

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Week 6. PRODUSAGE/UGC 1st November

This week we explore two further concepts relating to network cultures, specifically in relation to agency and creativity. Is UGC (user generated content) still a useful term? Should we be using a concept like ‘produsage’ instead? We ask what each term suggests about new media engagement, about agency, about creativity and authorship.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Participatory Media Cultures’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 106-143

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘User-Generated Content: we are all fans now’ in New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge. pp221-225

Additional Reading:

van Diijck, José (2009) Users Like You? Theorizing Agency in User-Generated Content in Media, culture & society 31(1) pp 41-58

Wardle, Claire & Williams, Andrew (2010) ‘Beyond User-Generated Content: A production study examining the ways in which UGC is used at the BBC’ in Media, culture & society 32:5 pp781-799

Thornham, Helen & McFarlane, Angela (forthcoming, 2012) ‘Fantasies of Creative Connectivity in BBC Blast’ in Popple and Thornham (ed) Content Cultures: Transformations of User Generated Content in Public Service Broadcasting IBTauris note: this will be made available to students as it is not yet out in print

Hesmondhalgh, David (2010) ‘User-Generated Content, free labour and the Cultural Industries in Ephemera 10:3/4 pp267-284 available at http://www.ephemeraweb.org/journal/10-3/10-3hesmondhalgh.pdf

Roberts, Ben (2009) ‘Beyond the ‘Networked Public Sphere’: Politics, Participation and Technics in Web 2.0’ in the Fibreculture journal 14 accessed at: http://fourteen.fibreculturejournal.org/fcj-093-beyond-the-networked-public-sphere-politics-participation-and-technics-in-web-2-0/

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Week 7. DIGITAL REPRESENTATIONS OF SELF AND IDENTITY 8th November

Ever since Sherry Turkle’s celebratory proclamations about cyberspace in the 90s, where she claimed that we could be whoever we wanted to be in cyberspace, questions around identity, representations and performance have abounded. We can create ourselves, and re-create ourselves online, however we want. Or can we? This week we explore the limits, consequences and constructions of online selves.

Key Reading:

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘Identities and Communities online’, ‘being anonymous’ & ‘belonging’ New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge. pp209-216

Turkle, Sherry (1995) ‘Identity in the age of the Internet’ in Life on The Screen. Simon and Schuster publications pp9-26 Available as an Online Course Reading in the VLE

Additional Reading:

Kennedy, H. (2006) 'Beyond anonymity, or futuredirections for Internet identity research' in New media and society vol 8 no 6 pp859-876.

Also available in Thornham, S., Bassett C. and Marris, P(ed.) (2009)Media Studies: A Reader 3rd Edition Edinburgh. Edinburgh University Press pp839-854

Davis, Jenny (2010) Architecture of the Personal Interactive Homepage: Constructing the Self through MySpace. New media and society 12(7) pp1103-1119

Wynn, E. and Katz, J.E. (1997) Hyperbole over cyberspace: Self-presentation and social boundaries in Internet home pages and discourse, Information society 13(4) pp 297-327.

Mendelson, Andrew and Papacharissi, Zizi (2011) ‘Look At Us: Collective Narcissism in College Student Facebook Photo Galleries’ in Papacharissi, Z (ed) A networked self : identity, community and culture on social network sites. London. Routledge 251-274 Available online

Gilpin, Dawn R. (2011) ‘Working the Twittersphere: Microblogging as Professional Identity Construction’ in Papacharissi, Z (ed) A networked self : identity, community and culture on social network sites. London. Routledge pp232-351 Available online

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Week 8. RE-MIX, FREE AND GIFT CULTURES 15th November

Following week 5, where we discussed UGC and produsage, this week we explore the wider implications of free tools and facilitates for expression, for use and for creativity. What are the implications and consequences of free software, for example? From the Tesco clubcard to downloadable game and music software, we ask what these emerging cultures might mean for democracy, for citizenship, for capitalism.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘The Global Knowledge Economy’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 193-218

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘Wiki worlds and Web 2.0’ in New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge. pp204-209

Barbrook, R. (1998) ‘The High-Tech Gift Economy’ in First Monday 3:12 available at http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/631/552

Additional Reading:

Barbrook, Richard reflections on the high tech gift economy. See http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/1517/1432

Popple, Simon (2011) “It’s not really our content”: The Moving Image and Media History in the Digital Archive Age’ in Park, Jankowski and Jones (ed.) The long history of new media. New York. Peter Lang Publishers pp317-333 Available as an Online Course Reading in the VLE

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Week 9. DIGITAL NARRATIVE AND STORY/TELLING 22th November

Following week 4 where we explored some examples of network cultures, this week we address the notion of digital narrative and storytelling, particularly in relation to game culture. Have these practices changed with the advent of new media? How do we understand once-chronological practices of storytelling?

Key Reading:

Murray, Janet H. (1997) ‘Harbingers on the Holodeck’ in Hamlet on the holodeck : the future of narrative in cyberspace Cambridge Mass. MIT Press pp27-65 Available as an Online Course Reading in the VLE

Ryan, Marie-Laure (2001) ‘Introduction’ in Narrative as virtual reality : immersion and interactivity in literature and electronic media. Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press. pp1-25 Available as an Online Course Reading in the VLE

Additional Reading:

Newman, James (2008) ‘Videogames and/as stories’ in Playing with videogames. London. Routledge pp 46-69 Available online

Carr, Diane (2002) ‘Playing with Lara’ in King & Krzywinska (ed) Screenplay : cinema/videogames/interfaces London. Wallflower Press pp171-181 Available as an Online Course Reading in the VLE

King, Geoff (2002) ‘Die Hard/Try Harder: Narrative, Spectacle and Beyond, from Hollywood to Videogame in King & Krzywinska (ed) Screenplay : cinema/videogames/interfaces London. Wallflower Press pp50-66

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Week 10. PUBLICITY/PRIVACY AND REPUTATION 29th November

Following weeks 7& 8, we address some of the implications online constructions of self and re-mix cultures may have for issues of privacy and reputation. Using news media and social media as examples, we ask whether we’re living in reputation economy and what that might mean. What do companies do with data generated through digital and networked databases? Does reputation now have economic value? What, if anything, is done with all the data we input about ourselves everyday?

Key Reading:

Nissenbaum, Helen ‘Personal Data: The Logic of Practice,’ in The Economist http://www.nyu.edu/projects/nissenbaum/papers/economist.pdf

Nissenbaum, Helen ‘TrackMeNot: Resisting Surveillance in Web Search’ accessed at http://www.nyu.edu/projects/nissenbaum/papers/HoweNissenbaum.pdf

Additional Reading:

boyd, danah (2008) ‘Facebook's Privacy Trainwreck: Exposure, Invasion, and Social Convergence’ in Convergence : the journal of research into new media technologies. 14:1 pp13-20

boyd, danah (2010) ‘Making Sense of Privacy and Publicity’ keynote address SWSX accessed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kl0VANhnvxk

Dean, Jodi (2008) ‘Communicative Capitalism: Circulation and the Foreclosure of Politics’ in Boler, Megan (ed.) Digital media and democracy : tactics in hard times Cambridge Mass.: MIT Press pp101-123

Hearn, Alison (2010) ‘Structuring Feeling: Web 2.0 OnlineRanking and Rating, and the digital ‘reputation’ economy’ in Ephemera: Theory and Politics in Organization 10:3/4 pp421-438 accessed at http://www.ephemeraweb.org/journal/10-3/10-3hearn.pdf

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Internet Law, policy and governance’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 218-247

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘Intellectual Property Rights, determined and determining’ in New media : a critical introduction, 3rd Edition, London: Routledge. pp189-191

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Week 11. SUMMING UP/CONCLUSIONS 6th December

What is new media? How do we understand it? We started this module with these two questions, and this week, we return to them. While the technology of new media may be new, many of the concerns and issues raised in the module are ongoing. This week we ask how new is new media?

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Conclusion’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 247-255

Lally, Elaine (2011) ‘The Domestic Ecology of Objects’ in Giddens, Seth and Lister, Martin (ed) (2011) The new media and technocultures reader London. Routledge pp423-437

Additional Reading:

Bassett, Caroline (2008) ‘New Maps for Old? The Cultural Stakes of Web 2.0 in Fibrecultures Journal 13 accessed at http://thirteen.fibreculturejournal.org/fcj-088-new-maps-for-old-the-cultural-stakes-of-2-0/

Manovich, Lev (2001) ‘The Myth of the Digital’ and ‘The Myth of Interactivity’ in The language of new media MIT Press pp52-62

Park, David, Jankowski, Nicholas & Jones, Steve (2011) ‘Introduction: History and New Media’ in Park, Jankowski & Jones (ed) The long history of new media : technology, historiography, and contextualizing newness. New York. Peter Lang Publishers pp xi- xviii

This list was last updated on 20/09/2011