Leeds University Library

HIST2135
HIST2135 Reading List

Britain and the Industrial Revolution, 2017/18, Semester 2
Dr Pete Maw
p.maw@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Reading List. HIST2135: Britain and the Industrial Revolution

Week 1. Conceptualising the industrial revolution

Seminar reading:

M. Berg and P. Hudson, ‘Rehabilitating the industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 25 (1992), pp. 24-50.

N.F.R Crafts, ‘The Industrial Revolution: Economic Growth in Britain, 1700-1860’, ReFRESH. , Vol. 4 (1987), pp. 1-4. [ http://www.ehs.org.uk/society/refresh.asp ].

Introductory accounts and overviews:

M. Berg, The age of manufactures, 1700-1820 : industry, innovation and work in Britain (2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 1994), chapter 1.

M. Berg and P. Hudson, ‘Rehabilitating the industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 25 (1992), pp. 24-50.

D. Cannadine, ‘The present and the past in the English industrial revolution’, Past & present. , Vol. 103 (1984), pp. 131-72.

M. J. Daunton, Progress and poverty : an economic and social history of Britain, 1700-1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), chapter 5.

E. Griffin, A short history of the British Industrial Revolution (London: Palgrave Macmillian 2010), chapter 1 .

J.E. Inikori, Africans and the industrial revolution in England [electronic resource] : a study in international trade and development (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), chapter 3.

P. Hudson, The industrial revolution (London: Arnold 1992), chapters, 1-2.

S. A. King and J. G. Timmins, Making sense of the Industrial Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001), chapters 1- 2.

J. Mokyr, The British industrial revolution: An economic perspective (2nd edition. Boulder, CO.: University of Colorado Press, 1999), pp. 1-19. Introduction online at: http://www.faculty.econ.northwestern.edu/faculty/mokyr/monster.PDF

J. Mokyr, ‘Has the Industrial Revolution been crowded out? ’, Explorations in economic history. , Vol. 24 (1987), pp. 293-319.

J. Mokyr, ‘Accounting for the industrial revolution’ in R. Floud and P. Johnson (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , vol. 1 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), pp. 1-27.

J. Mokyr, The enlightened economy : Britain and the industrial revolution 1700-1850 (Princeton: Yale University Press, 2009), chapters 5 & chapter 12.

The gradualist view:

P. Antras and H.J. Voth, ‘Effort or efficiency? Factor prices and productivity growth during the English industrial revolution’, Explorations in economic history. , Vol. 40 (2003), pp. 52-77.

J.H. Clapham, An economic history of modern Britain / by J.H. Clapham. v.1, The early railway age 1820-1850 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1930)

N. F. R. Crafts, British economic growth during the Industrial Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985).

N.F.R Crafts and Harley, C.K. ‘Output Growth and the British Industrial Revolution: a Restatement of the Crafts-Harley View’, The economic history review. , Vol. 45 (1992), pp. 703-30.

C.K. Harley and N.F.R Crafts, ‘Simulating two views of the industrial revolution’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 60 (2000), pp. 819-41.

C. Knick Harley, ‘Reassessing the Industrial Revolution: A Macro View’ in J. Mokyr (eds.) The British Industrial Revolution: An Economic Perspective (2nd edition. Boulder, CO.: Westview, 1999), pp. 160-205.

H. Heaton, ‘Industrial Revolution’ in R.M. Hartwell (Ed.) The causes of the Industrial Revolution in England (London: Methuen, 1967)

A.E. Musson, ‘The British industrial revolution’, History. , Vol. 67 (1982), pp. 252-8.

A.E. Musson, The growth of British industry (London: Batsford, 1978).

R. Samuel, ‘Workshop of the world: Steam power and hand technology in mid-Victorian Britain’, History workshop journal. , Vol. 3 (1977), pp. 6-72

J.G. Williamson, ‘Why was British growth so slow during the industrial revolution? ’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 44 (1984), pp. 687-712.

The industrial revolution as myth

R. Cameron, ‘The industrial revolution: A Misnomer’, History Teacher , Vol. 15 (1982), pp. 377-384.

M. Fores, 'The myth of the industrial revolution', History. , Vol. 66 (1981), pp. 181-198.

The 'discontinuity view'

A. Toynbee, Lectures on the Industrial Revolution of the Eighteenth Century in England : popular addresses, notes, and other fragments (London: Longman, 1908). [and many other editions].

M. Berg and P. Hudson, ‘Rehabilitating the industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 25 (1992), pp. 24-50.

P. Deane and W.A. Cole, British Economic Growth, 1688-1959: Trends and Structure (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1962).

E. Hobsbawm, Industry and empire: From 1750 to the present day (London: Penguin, 1969);

J. Hoppit, ‘Counting the Industrial Revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 43 (1990), pp. 173-93.

D.S. Landes, The unbound Prometheus: Technological change and industrial development in Western Europe from 1750 to the present (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969).

P. Mantoux, The industrial revolution in the eighteenth century: An outline of the beginnings of the modern factory system (edited with a new preface by T.S. Ashton. London: Macmillan, 1961)

W.W. Rostow, The stages of economic growth: A non-communist manifesto (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1960).

P. Temin, ‘Two views of the British Industrial Revolution’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 57 (1997), pp. 63-82.

P. Temin, ‘A response to Harley and Crafts’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 57 (2000), pp. 842-6.

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Week 2. The causes of the industrial revolution

Seminar reading:

J. Mokyr, The British industrial revolution: An economic perspective (2nd edition. Boulder, CO.: University of Colorado Press, 1999), pp. 19-68. Introduction online at: http://www.faculty.econ.northwestern.edu/faculty/mokyr/monster.PDF

P. Maw, Transport and the industrial city : Manchester and the canal age, 1750-1850 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013), pp. 209-216.

Introductory accounts

M. Berg, The age of manufactures, 1700-1820 : industry, innovation and work in Britain (2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 1994), Chapter 3.

E. Griffin, A short history of the British Industrial Revolution (London: Palgrave Macmillian, 2010), chapter 8.

M. Hartwell, ‘The causes of the industrial revolution: An essay in methodology’, The economic history review. , Vol. 18 (1965), pp. 164-184.

D. Landes, The Unbound Prometheus (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969), Introduction and chapter 2.

S. A. King and J. G. Timmins, Making sense of the Industrial Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001), chapters 1-3.

The debate on the ‘accidental’ Industrial Revolution:

N.F.R. Crafts, ‘Industrial revolution in Britain and France: some thoughts on the question“Why was England first? ”’, The economic history review. , New Series, Vol. 30 (1977), pp. 429-41.

D.S. Landes ‘What room for accident in history? Explaining big changes by small events’, The economic history review. , 2nd Series, Vol. 47 (1994), pp. 637–55.

N.F.R. Crafts, ‘Macroinventions, economic growth, and “industrial revolution” in Britain and France’ The economic history review. , Vol. 48 (1995), pp. 591-601.

N.F.R. Crafts, ‘Exogenous or Endogenous Growth? The Industrial Revolution Reconsidered’, The journal of economic history. , Vol., 55 (1995), pp. 745-772.

Global history approaches to the industrial revolution:

R. C. Allen, ‘The industrial revolution in miniature: The Spinning Jenny in Britain, France, and India’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 69 (2009), pp. 901-27.

R.C. Allen, ‘Why the industrial revolution was British: Commerce, induced invention, and the scientific revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 64 (2011), pp. 357-84.

R.C. Allen, The British Industrial Revolution in global perspective (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009).

S. Broadberry and G. Bishnupriya, ‘Lancashire, India and shifting competitive advantage in cotton textiles, 1700-1850: The neglected role of factor prices’, The economic history review. , Vol. 62 (2009), pp. 279-305.

K. Pomeranz, The Great divergence: China, Europe, and the making of the modern world economy (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000)

For specialist studies emphasising particular factors as causes, see:

Political institutions and the state:

N. Ferguson, The cash nexus : money and power in the modern world, 1700-2000 (London: Allen Lane, 2001).

D.C. North, Structure and change in economic history (London: Norton, 1981).

D.C. North, Institutions, institutional change and economic performance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990).

M. Olson, The rise and decline of nations : economic growth, stagflation and social rigidities (London: Yale University Press, 2007).

P.K. O’Brien, ‘Inseparable connections: trade, economy, state and empire’, in P.J. Marshall (ed.), The eighteenth century (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 54–77.

R. Brenner, ‘Agrarian class structure and economic growth in pre-industrial Europe’, Past & present. , Vol. 70 (1976), pp. 30–75.

J. Hoppit, ‘Political power and British economic life, 1650-1870’ in R. Floud, J. Humprhies, and P. Johnson (eds.) The Cambridge economic history of modern Europe, Volume 1, 1700 to 1870 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014).

* J. Hoppit, ‘The nation, the state, and the first industrial revolution’, The journal of British studies. , Vol. 50 (2011), pp. 307-31.

Foreign trade:

E. Hobsbawm, Industry and empire: from 1750 to the present day (London: Penguin, 1969), Chapter 4.

J.E. Inikori. Africans and the industrial revolution in England [electronic resource] : a study in international trade and development (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002).

Home trade and transport:

D. E. C. Eversley, ‘The home market and economic growth in England 1750-1850’ in E. L. Jones and G. Mingay, (eds.) Land, Labour and Population in the Industrial Revolution : essays presented to J. D. Chambers (London: Edward Arnold, 1967)

A.H. John, ‘Aspects of English economic growth in the first half of the eighteenth century’, Economica. , New Series, Vol. 28 (1961), pp. 176-90.

M.W. Flinn, The origins of the industrial revolution (London: Longman, 1966).

N. McKendrick, ‘Consumer revolution in eighteenth-century England’ in McKendrick, N., Brewer, J., and Plumb, J.H. (eds.) The birth of a consumer society (London: Europa, 1982).

Capital accumulation:

T.S. Ashton, The industrial revolution, 1760-1830 (London: Oxford University Press, 1948)

W.W. Rostow, The Stages of Economic Growth: A Non-Communist Manifesto (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1960).

The Industrial enlightenment and culture:

J. Mokyr, The enlightened economy : Britain and the industrial revolution 1700-1850 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009).

D. McCloskey, Bourgeois dignity: Why economics can’t explain the modern world (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010).

Coal and raw materials:

E. Griffin, A short history of the British Industrial Revolution (London: Palgrave Macmillian, 2010), chapter 7

G.L. Turnbull, ‘Canals, coal and regional growth during the industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 40 (1987), pp. 537-560.

E.A. Wrigley, Continuity, chance and change : the character of the industrial revolution in England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988).

E.A. Wrigley, Energy and the English Industrial Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009).

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Week 3. Dark satanic mills: Technological changes and the rise of factory

Seminar reading

D. C. Coleman, ‘Proto-industrialisation: a concept too many’ The economic history review. , Vol. 36 (1983), pp. 435-448.

P. Hudson, ‘Proto-industrialisation’, ReFRESH. , Vol. 10 (1990).

[ http://www.ehs.org.uk/dotAsset/1d40418e-b981-4076-8974-b81686a9d042.pdf ]

S.R.H. Jones, ‘Technology, Transaction Costs, and the Transition to Factory Production in the British Silk Industry, 1700-1870, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 47 (1987), pp. 71-96.

Introductions:

M. Berg, The age of manufactures, 1700-1820 : industry, innovation and work in Britain (2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 1994), Chapter 9.

S. A. King and J. G. Timmins, Making sense of the Industrial Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001), Chapter 3.

M. J. Daunton, Progress and poverty : an economic and social history of Britain, 1700-1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), chapter 7.

For general descriptions of technological change during the industrial revolution, see:

K. Bruland, ‘Industrial Organization and Technological change’ in R. Floud and P. Johnson, (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , Volume 1 Industrialisation, 1700-1860 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), chapter 5.

D. Landes, The Unbound Prometheus (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969), introduction.

J. Mokyr, The Lever of Riches: Technological Creativity and Economic Progress (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990). [eBook].

J. Mokyr, ‘Technological Change, 1700-1830’ in R. Floud and D. McCloskey (Ed.) The Economic History of Britain since 1700, Vol. 1 (2nd Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), chapter 2.

G.N. Von Tunzelmann, ‘Technology in the early nineteenth century’ in R. Floud and D. McCloskey (Ed.) The Economic History of Britain since 1700 , Vol. 1 (2nd Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), chapter 11.

The ‘Proto-industrialisation thesis’

M. Berg, The age of manufactures, 1700-1820 : industry, innovation and work in Britain (2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 1994), chapter 2 (for Proto-industrialisation, pp. 66-76, for regions, p. 27, technology p. 28 -30).

L.A. Clarkson, Proto-industrialization : the first phase of industrialization? (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1985).

D. C. Coleman, ‘Proto-industrialisation: a concept too many’ The economic history review. , Vol. 36, (1983), pp. 435-448.

M. J. Daunton, Progress and poverty : an economic and social history of Britain, 1700-1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), chapter 6.

R. Houston and K. D. M. Snell, ‘Proto-industrialisation? cottage industry, social change and the industrial revolution’, The historical journal. , Vol. 27 (1984), pp. 473-492.

P. Hudson, 'Proto-industrialisation: the case of the West Riding textile industry' History workshop journal. , Vol. 12, (1981), pp. 34-61.

P. Hudson, (ed.) Regions and industries : a perspective on the industrial revolution in Britain (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989).

P. Hudson, ‘Proto-industrialisation in England’ in M. Cerman and S. Ogilvie (eds.) European proto-industrialization : an introductory handbook (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).

S. A. King and J. G. Timmins, Making sense of the Industrial Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001), Chapter 2.

P. Kriedte, H. Medick and J. Schumbohm, Industrialization before industrialization : rural industry in the genesis of capitalism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981).

W. Mager, ‘Proto-industrialisation and proto-industry: the uses and drawbacks of two concepts’, Continuity and Change Vol. 8, (1993), pp. 181-215.

H. Medick, ‘The proto-industrial family economy’, Social history. , Vol. 1, (1976), pp. 291-315.

F. F. Mendels, ‘Proto-industrialisation: the first phase of the industrialisation process’, The journal of economic history. , 32 (1972), pp. 241-61.

The debate on the rise of the factory

T.S. Ashton, The industrial revolution, 1760-1830 (London: Oxford University Press, 1948), pp. 70-6.

M. Berg, The age of manufactures, 1700-1820 : industry, innovation and work in Britain (2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 1994), chapter 9.

J.H. Clapham, An economic history of modern Britain / by J.H. Clapham. v.1, The early railway age 1820-1850 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1930), pp. 143-7; 192-7.

* M.J. Daunton, Progress and poverty : an economic and social history of Britain, 1700-1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), chapter 7.

T.M. Geraghty, ‘The factory system in the British industrial revolution: A complementarity thesis’, European economic review. , Vol. 51 (2007), pp. 1329-50.

D.S. Landes, The unbound Prometheus: Technological change and industrial development in Western Europe from 1750 to the present (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969).

* S.A. Marglin, ‘What do bosses do? The origin and function of hierarchy in capitalist production’, Review of radical political economics. , Vol. 6 (1974).

P. Mathias, The first industrial nation: An economic history of Britain, 1700-1914 (Second edition. London: Methuen, 1983), pp. 128-33.

D.C. North, Structure and change in economic history (London: Norton, 1981).

S.R.H. Jones, ‘Technology, Transaction Costs, and the Transition to Factory Production in the British Silk Industry, 1700-1870’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 47 (1987), pp. 71-96.


S. Pollard, ‘Factory discipline in the industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 16 (1963-4).

O.E. Williamson, ‘The organization of work’, Journal of economic behavior & organization. , Vol. 1 (1980).

Science, engineering and the Industrial enlightenment

R.C. Allen, The British Industrial Revolution in global perspective (2009), chapter 10.

J. Gascoigne, Joseph Banks and the English Enlightenment : useful knowledge and polite culture (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994).

P. M. Jones, Industrial enlightenment : science, technology and culture in Birmingham and the West Midlands, 1760-1820 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2008).

P. Mathias, ‘Who Unbound Prometheus? Science and Technical Change, 1600-1800’ in A.E. Musson (ed.) Science, technology, and economic growth in the eighteenth century (London: Methuen, 1972), pp. 69-96.

J. Mokyr, Joel, ‘The intellectual origins of modern economic growth’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 65 (2005), pp. 285-351.

J. Mokyr, The enlightened economy (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009), especially chapters 2 and 3.

A.E. Musson (ed.) Science, technology, and economic growth in the eighteenth century (London: Methuen, 1972).

A.E. Musson, and E. Robinson, ‘Science and Industry in the late Eighteenth Century’, The economic history review. , 2nd series, Vol. 13 (1960), pp. 222-44.

British industries:

A.E. Musson, The growth of British industry (London: Batsford, 1978).

i) Textiles:

S.D. Chapman, The Cotton Industry in the Industrial Revolution (2nd edition. London: Macmillan, 1987).

M.M. Edwards, The growth of the British cotton trade,1780-1815. (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1967).

H. Heaton, The Yorkshire woollen and worsted industries : from the earliest times up to the Industrial Revolution (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1920).

P. Hudson, The genesis of industrial capital : a study of the West Riding wool textile industry c.1750-1850 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986).

D.T. Jenkins and K.G. Ponting, The British wool textile industry 1770-1914 ( London : Heinemann, 1982).

R.Lloyd-Jones and M.J. Lewis, Manchester and the age of the factory : the business structure of Cottonopolis in the industrial revolution (London: Croom Helm, 1988).

J. de Lacy Mann, The cloth industry in the west of England from 1640 to 1880 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1971).

J. Smail, Merchants, markets and manufacture : the English wool textile industry in the eighteenth century (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1999).

M.B. Rose (ed.) The Lancashire cotton industry : a history since 1700 (Preston: Lancashire County Books, 1996).

M.B. Rose, Firms, networks and business values : the British and American cotton industries since 1750 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).

A.P. Wadsworth, and J. de. L. Mann, The cotton trade and industrial Lancashire, 1600-1780 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1931).

ii) Metals/metalwares

G.C. Allen, The industrial development of Birmingham and the black country, 1860-1927 (London: G. Allen & Unwin, 1929).

T.S. Ashton, Iron and Steel in the Industrial Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1924).

M. Berg, ‘Commerce and creativity in eighteenth-century Birmingham’ in M. Berg (ed.) Markets and manufacture in early industrial Europe London: Routledge, 1991).

J. Day, Bristol brass : a history of the industry (Newton Abbott: David & Charles, 1973).

C. Evans and G. Ryden, The industrial revolution in iron : the impact of British coal technology in nineteenth-century Europe (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004).

C. Evans and A. Withey, ‘An enlightenment in Steel? Innovation in the Steel Trades of Eighteenth-Century Britain, Technology and culture. , Vol. 53 (2012), pp. 2-29.

C. Evans, ‘Baltic iron and the British iron industry in the eighteenth century’, The economic history review. , Vol. 55 (2002), pp. 642-55.

H. Hamilton, The English brass & copper industries to 1800 (2nd Edition, London: Frank Cass & Co. 1967).

J.R. Harris, The British iron industry, 1700-1850 (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1988)

E. Hopkins, Birmingham : the first manufacturing town in the world, 1760-1840 (London: Weidenfield & Nicolson, 1989).

C.K. Hyde, Technological change and the British iron industry, 1700-1870 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1977).

M. Rowlands, Masters and men : in the West Midland metalware trades before the Industrial Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1975)

iii) Mining

R. Burt, ‘The Extractive Industries’ in R. Floud and P. Johnson, The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , Volume 1 Industrialisation, 1700-1860 (eds.), (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), chapter 15.

G. Clark, and Jacks, D. ‘Coal and the industrial revolution, 1700-1869’, European review of economic history , Vol. 11 (2007), pp. 39-72.

M.W. Flinn, The history of the British coal industry. Vol.2, 1700-1830: the Industrial Revolution (Oxford; Oxford University Press, 1984).

B.R. Mitchell, Economic development of the British coal industry 1800-1914 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984).

iv) Other industries

D.C. Coleman, The British paper industry,1495-1860 : a study in industrial growth. (Oxford: Clarendon, 1958).

P. Mathias, The brewing industry in England,1700-1830. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1959).

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Week 4. An Agricultural Revolution?

Seminar reading

M. Berg, The age of manufactures, 1700-1820 : industry, innovation and work in Britain (2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 1994), chapter 4.

M. J. Daunton, Progress and poverty : an economic and social history of Britain, 1700-1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), chapter 2.

M. Overton ‘Agricultural Revolution? England, 1540-1850’, ReFRESH. , Vol. 3 (1986) [ http://www.ehs.org.uk/society/refresh.asp ]

Introductory accounts

M. Berg, The age of manufactures, 1700-1820 : industry, innovation and work in Britain (2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 1994), chapter 4.

S. A. King and J. G. Timmins, Making sense of the Industrial Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001), Chapter 6.

J. Mokyr, The enlightened economy : Britain and the industrial revolution 1700-1850 (Princeton: Yale University Press, 2009), chapter 9.

The agricultural revolution

R. C. Allen, ‘Tracking the agricultural revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 52 (1999), pp. 209-235.

R.C. Allen, ‘Two English agricultural revolutions, 1450-1850’ in in B.M.S. Campbell and M. Overton (eds.) Land, labour and livestock : historical studies in European agricultural productivity (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1991).

R. C. Allen, Enclosure and the yeoman (Oxford: Clarendon, 1992).

R. C. Allen, ‘The growth of labor productivity in early modern English agriculture’, Explorations in economic history. , Vol. 25 (1988), pp. 117-146.

R.C. Allen, ‘The nitrogen hypothesis and the English agricultural revolution: A biological analysis’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 86 (2008), pp. 182-210.

T.W. Beastall, The agricultural revolution in Lincolnshire (Lincoln: Society of Lincolnshire History & Archaeology, 1978).

J. V. Beckett, The Agricultural Revolution (Oxford: Blackwell, 1990)

J.D. Chambers and G.E. Mingay, The agricultural revolution, 1750-1880. (London: Batsford, 1966).

G. Clark, ‘Labour productivity in English agriculture, 1300-1860’, in B.M.S. Campbell and M. Overton (eds.) Land, labour and livestock : historical studies in European agricultural productivity (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1991).

R.E.P. Ernle, English farming: Past and Present (London: Heinemann, 1961).

P. Glennie, ‘Measuring crop yields in early modern England’ in in B.M.S. Campbell and M. Overton (eds.) Land, labour and livestock : historical studies in European agricultural productivity (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1991).

R. V. Jackson, ‘Growth and deceleration in English agriculture, 1660-1790’, The economic history review. , Vol. 38 (1985), pp. 333-51.

E. Kerridge, The agricultural revolution (London: Allen & Unwin, 1967).

E. L. Jones, Agriculture and economic growth in England, 1650-1815 (London: Methuen, 1969), introduction.

E. L. Jones, Agriculture and the Industrial Revolution (Oxford: Blackwell, 1974)

M. Overton ‘Agricultural Revolution? England, 1540-1850’, ReFRESH. , Vol. 3 (1986) [http://www.ehs.org.uk/society/refresh.asp]

M. Overton, ‘The determinants of crop yields’ in in B.M.S. Campbell and M. Overton (eds.) Land, labour and livestock : historical studies in European agricultural productivity (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1991).

M. Overton , Agricultural revolution in England : the transformation of the agrarian economy, 1500-1850 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).

M. Overton, ‘Re-establishing the Agricultural Revolution’, Agricultural history review. , Vol. 44 (1996), pp. 1-20. [ http://www.bahs.org.uk/AGHR/ARTICLES/44n1a1.pdf ]

M. Overton, ‘English agrarian history before 1850: an historiographical review’ in Thoen E. Molle (eds.) Rural history in the North Sea area : an overview of recent research, Middle Ages-twentieth century (Brepols: Turnhout, 2006), pp. 35-71

P. Mantoux, The industrial revolution in the eighteenth century : an outline of the beginnings of the modern factory system in England (London: Methuen, 1961), chapter 3.

A. Toynbee, Lectures on the Industrial Revolution of the Eighteenth Century in England : popular addresses, notes, and other fragments (London: Longman, 1908). [and many other editions], chapter 3 and (relevant parts of chapter 8).

F.M.L. Thompson, ‘The second agricultural revolution, 1815-1880’, The economic history review. , Vol. 21 (1968), pp. 62-77.

J.R. Wordie, ‘The chronology of English enclosures, 1500-1914’, The economic history review. , Vol. 36 (1983), pp. 483-505.

On agriculture’s role in the industrial revolution, see:

R.C. Allen, ‘Agriculture during the industrial revolution’ R. Floud and P. Johnson (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , vol. 1 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004).

R. Brenner, ‘Agrarian class structure and economic growth in pre-industrial Europe’, Past & present. , Vol. 70 (1976), pp. 30–75.

G. Clark, ‘Agriculture in the Industrial Revolution’ in J. Mokyr (ed.) The British industrial revolution: An economic perspective (Colorado: Westview, 1999).

M. J. Daunton, Progress and poverty : an economic and social history of Britain, 1700-1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), chapter 4.

P. Hudson, The industrial revolution (London: Arnold 1992), chapter 3.

P. Hudson, The genesis of industrial capital : a study of the West Riding wool textile industry c.1750-1850 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986) chapter 4.

E. L. Jones, (ed.) Agriculture and economic growth in England, 1650-1815 (London: Methuen, 1969), introduction.

P. Mantoux, The industrial revolution in the eighteenth century : an outline of the beginnings of the modern factory system in England (London: Methuen, 1961), chapter 3.

P. Mathias, ‘Agriculture and industrialization’ in P. Mathias and J.A. Davis (eds.) The first industrial revolutions (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989).

D. Meredith and D. Oxley, ‘Food and fodder: Feeding England, 1700-1900’, Past & present. , Vol. 222 (2014), pp. 163-214.

P. K. O’Brien, ‘Agriculture and the industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 30 (1977), pp. 166-181.

P. K. O’Brien, ‘Agriculture and the home market for English industry, 1660-1820’, English historical review. , Vol. 100 (1985), pp. 773-800.

T. Raybould, ‘Aristocratic landowners and the industrial revolution: the Black Country experience’, Midland history. , Vol. 9 (1984), pp. 59-86.

L. Shaw-Taylor, ‘The rise of agrarian capitalism and the decline of family farming in England’, The economic history review. , Vol. 65 (2012), pp. 26-60.

J. T. Ward and R. G. Wilson (eds.) Land and industry : the landed estate and the Industrial Revolution : a symposium (Newton Abbott: David & Charles, 1971).

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Week 5. Women, children and the industrial revolution

Seminar reading

J. Humphries, ‘Childhood and child labour in the British industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 66 (2013), pp. 395-418.

P. Sharpe, ‘Continuity and change: Women’s history and economic history in Britain’, The economic history review. , Vol. 48 (1995), pp. 353-69.

J. Humphries, ‘From Work to Dependence? Women’s experience of industrialisation in Britain’, ReFRESH. , Vol. 21 (1995). [http://www.ehs.org.uk/society/refresh.asp].

Introductory accounts

M. Berg, ‘Women’s work and the industrial revolution’, ReFRESH. , Vol. 12 (1991). [http://www.ehs.org.uk/society/refresh.asp].

J. Mokyr, The enlightened economy : Britain and the industrial revolution 1700-1850 (Princeton: Yale University Press, 2009), chapter 14.

Further reading

Women and the industrial revolution

H. Barker, ‘women and work’ in H. Barker and E. Chalus (eds.) Women's history : Britain, 1700-1850 : an introduction (London: Routledge, 2005). [eBook].

M. Berg, ‘Women’s work, mechanisation and the early phases of industrialisation in England’ in P. Joyce (ed.) The Historical meanings of work (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987).

M. Berg, ‘What difference did women’s work make to the industrial revolution? ’, History workshop journal. , Vol. 35 (1993), pp. 22-44.

J. Burnette, ‘An investigation of the female-male wage gap during the industrial revolution in Britain’, The economic history review. , Vol. 57 (1997), pp. 257-81.

J. Burnette, Gender, work and wages in industrial revolution Britain (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008). [eBook]

A. Clark, The struggle for the breeches: Gender and the making of the British working class (Berkley: University of California Press, 1995). [eBook].

L. Davidoff and C. Hall, Family fortunes: men and women of the English middle class 1780-1850 (London: Routledge, 2002), chapters 4 and 6.

P. Earle, ‘The female labour market in London in the late-seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries’, The economic history review. , Vol. 42 (1989), pp. 328-53.

A.L. Erickson, ‘Married women’s occupations in eighteenth-century London’, Continuity and Change , Vol. 23 (2008), pp. 267-307.

N. Goose (ed.) Women's work in industrial England : regional and local perspectives (Hatfield: Local Population Studies, 2007)

E. Griffin, Liberty's dawn : a people's history of the Industrial Revolution (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), chapter 4

K. Honeyman, Women, gender and industrialization in England, 1700-1870 (London: Palgrave MacMillan, 2000).

K. Honeyman and J. Goodman, ‘Women’s work, gender conflict and labour markets in Europe 1500-1900’, The economic history review. , Vol. 44 (1991), pp. 608-28.

P. Hudson and W. R. Lee (eds.) Women's work and the family economy in historical perspective (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1990), Introduction.

P. Hudson, ‘Women and industrialisation’ in J. . Purvis (ed.) Women's history : Britain, 1850-1945 : an introduction (Bristol, PA.: UCL Press, 1995).

J. Humphries, ‘Women and paid work’ in J. Purvis (ed.) Women's history : Britain, 1850-1945 : an introduction (Bristol, PA.: UCL Press, 1995) .

J. Humphries, ‘..."the most free from objection..." the sexual division of labor and women’s work in nineteenth-century England’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 47 (1987), pp. 929-949.

J. Humphries, ‘Women’s labour force participation and the transition to the male breadwinner family, 1790-1865’, The economic history review. , Vol. 48 (1995), pp. 89-117.

J. Humphries, ‘Female-headed households: The vanguard of the proletariat? ’, Labour history review. , Vol. 63 (1998), pp. 31-65.

J. Humphries, ‘Household economy’, in R. Floud and P. Johnson (eds.) The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , Vol. 1 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004).

A. V. John (ed.), Unequal opportunities : women's employment in England 1800-1918 (Oxford: Blackwell, 1986).

P. Minoletti, ‘The importance of ideology: the shift to factory production and its effects on women’s employment opportunities in the English textile industries, 1760-1850’, Continuity and Change , Vol. 28 (2013), pp. 121-46.

C. Muldrew, ‘ “Th’ancient distaff and whirling spindle’: Measuring the contribution of spinning to household earnings and the national economy in England, 1550-1770’, The economic history review. , Vol. 65 (2012), pp. 498-526.

I. Pinchbeck, Women workers and the industrial revolution (London: Routledge, 1930).

J. Rendall, Women in an industrializing society : England 1750-1880 (Oxford: Blackwell, 1990).

E. Richards, ‘Women in the British economy since about 1700: An interpretation’, History. , Vol. 59 (1974), pp. 337-357.

P. Sharpe, ‘The women’s harvest: Straw-plaiting and the representation of labouring women’s employment, c.1793-1885’, Rural history. , Vol. 5 (1994), pp. 129-42.

P. Sharpe, ‘Continuity and change: Women’s history and economic history in Britain’, The economic history review. , Vol. 48 (1995), pp. 353-69.

P. Sharpe, Adapting to capitalism : working women in the English economy, 1700-1850 (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1996).

P. Sharpe (ed.) Women's work : the English experience, 1650-1914 (London: Arnold, 1998).

L.A. Tilly, ‘Women, Women’s History, and the Industrial Revolution, Social research. , Vol. 61 (1994), pp. 115-37.

* D. Valenze, The First industrial woman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995). [eBook]

N. Verdon, ‘“subjects deserving of the highest praise”: Farmers’ wives and the farm economy in England’, Agricultural history review. , Vol. 51 (2003), pp. 23-39.

A. Vickery, ‘Golden age to separate spheres? a review of the categories and chronology of English women’s history’, The historical journal. , Vol. 36 (1993), pp. 383-414.

Child Labour

J. Burnette, ‘Child day labourers in agriculture: Evidence from farm accounts’, The economic history review. , Vol. 65 (2012), pp. 1077-1099.

P. Bolin-Hort, Work, Work, family and the state : child labour and the organization of production in the British cotton industry, 1780-1920 (Lund: Lund University Press, 1989).

H. Cunningham, ‘The employment and unemployment of children in England c. 1680–1851’, Past & present. , 126 (1990), pp. 115-150.

M. Cruikshank, Children and industry : child health and welfare in North-west textile towns during the nineteenth century (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1981).

H. Freudenberger, F. J. Mather and C. Nardinelli, ‘A New Look at the Early Factory Labour Force’, The journal of economic history. y , Vol. 44 (1984), pp. 1085-90.

E. Griffin, Liberty's dawn : a people's history of the Industrial Revolution (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), chapter 3.

K. Honeyman, Child workers in England, 1780-1820 : parish apprentices and the making of the early industrial labour force (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007).

P. Horn, ‘Child workers in the pillow lace and straw plait trades of Victorian Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire’, The historical journal. , Vol. 17 (1974), pp. 779-95.

J. Humphries, ‘The lure of aggregates and the pitfalls of the patriarchal perspective: A critique of the high-wage economy interpretation of the British industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 65 (2013), pp. 693-714.

J. Humphries, Childhood and child labour in the British Industrial Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010). eBook.

S. Horrell and J. Humphries. ‘“The Exploitation of Little Children”: Child Labour and the Family Economy in the Industrial Revolution’ Explorations in economic history. , Vol. 32 (1995), pp. 485-515.

P. Kirby, Child labour in Britain, 1750-1870 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2003).

P. Kirby, ‘How Many Children were “Unemployed” in Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century England? ’, Past & present. , Vol. 187 (2005), pp. 187-202.

P. Kirby, ‘A brief statistical sketch of the child labour market in mid-nineteenth century London’ Continuity and Change , Vol. 20 (2005), pp. 229-46.

P. Kirby, ‘Causes of short stature among coal mining children, 1825-1850’, The economic history review. , XLVIII (1995), pp. 687-99.

M. Lavalette, (ed.) A thing of the past? : child labour in Britain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries . (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1999).

C. Nardinelli, ‘Child labor and the Factory Acts’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 40 (1980), pp. 739-755.

C. Nardinelli, ‘Were Children Exploited During the Industrial Revolution? ’, Research in economic history. , Vol. 2 (1988), pp. 243-276.

C. Nardinelli , Child labor and the industrial revolution (Ann Arbor: UMI, 2002).

M.B. Rose, ‘Social Policy and Business: Parish Apprentices and the Early Factory System 1750–1834’, Business history. , Vol. 21 (1989), pp. 5-32.

C. Tuttle, ‘A Revival of the Pessimist View: Child Labour and the Industrial Revolution’, Research in economic history. , Vol. 18 (1998), pp. 53-82.

C. Tuttle , Hard at work in factories and mines : the economics of child labor during the British Industrial Revolution (Oxford: Westview, 1999).

M. Winstanley (ed.) Working children in nineteenth-century Lancashire (Preston: Lancashire County Books, 1995).

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Week 6. Life and death: population growth and urbanisation.

Seminar reading

E. Griffin, A short history of the British Industrial Revolution (2010), chapter 4.

E. A. Wrigley, ‘Population Growth: England 1680-1820’, ReFRESH. [ http://www.ehs.org.uk/society/refresh.asp ].

Introductions

M. J. Daunton, Progress and poverty : an economic and social history of Britain, 1700-1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), Chapter 15.

S. A. King and J. G. Timmins, Making sense of the Industrial Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001), chapter 7.

The Wrigley/Schofield thesis (in date order):

E. A. Wrigley and R. S. Schofield, The population history of England, 1541-1871 : a reconstruction (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981).

E. A. Wrigley, ‘The growth of population in eighteenth century England: a conundrum resolved’, Past & present. , Vol. 98 (1983), pp. 121-150.

R.S. Schofield, ‘English marriage patterns revisited’, Journal of Family History. , Vol. 10 (1985), pp. 2-20.

E.A. Wrigley, R. Davies, J.E. Oeppen, and R.S. Schofield, English population history from family reconstitution 1580-1837 , (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997)

E.A. Wrigley, E.A., ‘How reliable is our knowledge of the demographic characteristics of the English population in the early modern period? ’, The historical journal. , Vol. 40 (1997).

E.A. Wrigley, ‘Explaining the increase in marital fertility in the “long” eighteenth century’, The economic history review. , Vol. 51 (1998), pp. 435-64.

E.A. Wrigley, ‘British Population during the ‘long’ eighteenth century, 1680-1840’ in R. Floud and P. Johnson (Eds.) The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , Volume 1 Industrialisation, 1700-1860 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004).

E.A. Wrigley, ‘English county populations in the later eighteenth century’, The economic history review. , Vol. 60 (2007), pp. 35-69.

E.A. Wrigley, The early English censuses (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011).

Critiques of Wrigley and Schofield:

M.W. Flinn, ‘The population history of England, 1541-1871’, The economic history review. , Vol. 35 (1982), pp. 443-57.

J.A. Goldstone, ‘The demographic revolution in England: a re-examination’, Population studies. , Vol. 40 (1986), pp. 5-33.

E. Griffin, ‘A conundrum resolved: Rethinking courtship, marriage and population growth in eighteenth-century England’, Past & present. , Vol. 215 (2012), pp. 125-164.

J. Hatcher, ‘Understanding the population history of England, 1450-1750', Past and Present , Vol. 180 (2003)., pp. 83-130.

B. Hill, ‘The marriage age of women and the demographers’, History workshop journal. , Vol. 28, (1989), pp. 129-147.

J. Mokyr, ‘Three centuries of population change’, Economic Development and Cultural Change , Vol. 32 (1983)., pp. 183-192.

P. Razzell, ‘The growth of population in eighteenth-century England: A Reappraisal’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 53 (1993), pp. 743-771.

S. Ruggles, ‘The limitations of English family reconstitution, 1680-1837’, Continuity and Change , Vol, 14 (1999), pp. 105-30.

C. Wilson R. Woods, R., ‘Fertility in England: a long-term perspective’, Population studies. , Vol. 45 (1991), pp. 399-415.

Various authors, ‘The population history of England: a review symposium’, Social history. , Vol. 8 (1983), pp. 139-168.

Mortality:

B. Harris, ‘Public health, nutrition and the decline of mortality: The McKeown Thesis revisited’, Social history of medicine. , Vol. 17 (2004), pp. 379-407.

S. Horrell and D. Oxley, ‘Bringing home the bacon? Regional nutrition, stature and gender in the industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 65 (2012), pp. 1354-79.

P. Huck, ‘Infant mortality and living standards of English workers during the industrial revolution’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 55 (1995), pp. 528-550.

J. Landers, ‘Age patterns of mortality in London during the 18th century’, Social history of medicine. , Vol. 3 (1990), pp. 27-60.

J. Landers, ‘Mortality and metropolis: the case of London, 1675-1825’, Population studies. , Vol. 41 (1987), pp. 59-76.

T. McKeown, The modern rise of population (London: Arnold, 1976).

P. Razzell, ‘The growth of population in eighteenth-century England: A Reappraisal’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 53 (1993), pp. 743-771.

S.R.S Szreter and G. Mooney, ‘Urbanisation, mortality and the standard of living debate’, The economic history review. , Vol. 51 (1998), pp. 84-112.

R. Woods, ‘The effects of population redistribution on the level of mortality in Nineteenth-Century England and Wales’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 45 (1985), pp. 645-651.

R. Woods, ‘The structure of mortality in mid-19th century England and Wales’, Journal of historical geography. , Vol. 8 (1982), pp. 373-94.

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Week 7. Home and foreign trade: Markets and the industrial revolution (Lecture only: no seminar in week 7).

Introductions

M. Berg, The age of manufactures, 1700-1820 : industry, innovation and work in Britain (2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 1994), chapter 6.

J. Mokyr, ‘Editors Introduction’ in J. Mokyr (ed.) The British Industrial Revolution: An Economic Perspective ( 2nd Edition 1999 ), pp. 67-75. [ http://www.faculty.econ.northwestern.edu/faculty/mokyr/monster.PDF ]

P. Hudson, The industrial revolution (London: Arnold 1992), chapter 6.

C. More, Understanding the Industrial Revolution (New York: Routledge, 2000), pp. 88-93.

D. McCloskey and R.P. Thomas, ‘Overseas Trade and Empire 1700-1860’ in Floud, R.C. and McCloskey, D.M. (eds.) The Economic History of Britain since 1700 : Vol. 1 (1st edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981), pp. 87-102. http://www.deirdremccloskey.org/docs/graham/overseas.pdf )

The debate on supply, demand and the industrial revolution

W.A. Cole, ‘Factors in demand’ in R. Floud and D. McCloskey (eds) The economic history of Britain since 1700 vol 1. (1st edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981).

M. J. Daunton, Progress and poverty : an economic and social history of Britain, 1700-1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), Chapter 10.

K. O’Rourke and R. Findlay, Power and plenty : trade, war, and the world economy in the second millennium (Princeton, 2007), Chapter 6 [eBook].

B. Fine, and E. Leopold, ‘Consumerism and the Industrial Revolution’, Social history. , Vol. 15 (1990), pp. 151-179.

E. Gilboy, 'Demand as a factor in the industrial revolution' reprinted in R. M. Hartwell (ed.) The causes of the Industrial Revolution in England (London: Methuen, 1967).

D. McCloskey, 'The industrial revolution 1780-1860: a survey' in R. Floud and D. McCloskey (eds) The economic history of Britain since 1700 vol 1 (2nd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994).

J. Mokyr, ‘Demand vs. supply in the industrial revolution’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 37 (1977), pp. 981-1008.

For the view that trade was NOT a cause of the industrial revolution:

R. Davis, Industrial Revolution and British overseas trade (1979), chapter 5.

P. Deane and W.A. Cole, British Economic Growth, 1688-1959 (1962), pp. 82-97.

D. Eltis and S.L. Engerman, ‘The Importance of Slavery and the Slave Trade to Industrializing Britain’, Journal of Economic History , Vol. 60 (2000), pp. 123-144.

C. Knick Harley, ‘Trade: discovery, mercantilism and technology’ in R. Floud and P. Johnson (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , vol. 1 (2004), pp. 175-186.

D. McCloskey and R. Thomas, ‘Overseas Trade and Empire 1700-1860’ in Floud and McCloskey (Eds) The Economic History of Britain since 1700 : Vol. 1 (1st Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981).

J. Mokyr, ‘Editors Introduction’ in J. Mokyr, The British industrial revolution: An economic perspective (2nd edition. Boulder, CO.: University of Colorado Press, 1999), pp. 67-75. [online at http://www.faculty.econ.northwestern.edu/faculty/mokyr/monster.PDF ]

J. K. J. Thomson, ‘British industrialisation and the external world: a unique experience or an archetypal model? ’ in M. Bienefeld and M. Godfrey (eds.) The struggle for development : national strategies in an international context (Chichester: Wiley, 1982)

More positive/balanced accounts of trade’s role in the industrial revolution

R.C. Allen, The British Industrial Revolution in global perspective (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), Part 1.

R. Blackburn, The American crucible : slavery, emancipation and human rights (London: Verso, 2011), pp. 99-120.

J. Cuenca-Esteban, ‘The Rising Share of British Industrial exports in industrial output, 1700-1851’, The journal of economic history. , 57 (1997), pp. 879-906

J. Cuenca-Esteban, ‘Comparative patterns of colonial trade’ in L. Padros de la Escosura (ed.) Exceptionalism and industrialisation : Britain and its European rivals, 1688-1815 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004).

T. Hatton, J.S. Lyons and S.E. Satchell. 'Eighteenth century British trade: homespun or empire made? ' Explorations in economic history. , Vol. 20, (1983), pp. 163-182.

J.E. Inikori and S.L. Engerman (eds.) The Atlantic Slave Trade: Effects on economies, societies, and peoples in Africa, the Americas and Europe (London: Duke University Press, 1992), esp. chapters by Inikori, Smith, and Darity Jnr.

J.E. Inikori. Africans and the industrial revolution in England : a study in international trade and development (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002).

M. Llorca-Jana, The British textile trade in South America in the nineteenth century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012).

K. Morgan, Slavery, Atlantic trade and the British economy, 1660-1800 (Cambridge: 2000).

P.K. O’Brien and S.L. Engerman, ‘Exports and the growth of the British economy from the Glorious Revolution to the Peace of Amiens’ in B.L. Solow (ed.) Slavery and the rise of the Atlantic system (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991).

J. Smail, Merchants, markets and manufacture : the English wool textile industry in the eighteenth century (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1999), introduction.

B.L. Solow and S. L. Engerman, British capitalism and Caribbean Slavery: The Legacy of Eric Williams (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), esp. chapters by Solow, Richardson and Inikori.

Home demand and the industrial revolution

D. E. C Eversley, ‘The home market and economic growth in England 1750-1850’ in E. L. Jones and G. Mingay, (eds.) Land, Labour and Population in the Industrial Revolution : essays presented to J. D. Chambers (London: Edward Arnold, 1967).

S. Horrell, ‘Home demand and British industrialisation’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 56 (1996), pp. 564-82.

A.H. John, ‘Aspects of English economic growth in the first half of the eighteenth century’, Economica. , New Series, Vol. 28 (1961), pp. 176-90.

M.W. Flinn, The origins of the industrial revolution (London: Longman, 1966).

N. McKendrick, ‘Consumer revolution in eighteenth-century England’ McKendrick, N., Brewer, J., and Plumb, J.H. (eds.) The birth of a consumer society (London: Europa, 1982). Available as an Online Course Reading in the VLE

P.K. O’Brien, ‘Agriculture and the home market for industry, 1660-1820’, English historical review. , Vol. 100 (1985), pp. 773-800.

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Week 8. The Economy on the Move: Transport and the Industrial Revolution.

Seminar reading:

M.J. Freeman, ‘Introduction’ in Aldcroft, D.H. and Freeman, M.J. (eds.) Transport in the industrial revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1983), pp. 1-30.

P. Maw, Transport and the industrial city : Manchester and the canal age, 1750-1850 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013), pp. 69-83, 83-104, 236-260.

Further reading

W. Albert, The turnpike road system in England, 1663-1840 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1972).

D.H. Aldcroft and M.J. Freeman (eds.) Transport in the industrial revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1983).

D. Aldcroft and M.J. Freeman (eds.) Transport in Victorian Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1988).

P.S. Bagwell, The transport revolution from 1770 (London: Batsford, 1974).

T.C. Barker, ‘Transport: The survival of the old besides the new’ in Mathias, P. and Davis, J.A. (eds.) The first industrial revolutions (Oxford: Blackwell, 1989), pp. 86-100.

T.C. Barker and C.I. Savage, An economic history of transport in Britain. (3rd Edition, London: Hutchinson, 1974).

T.C. Barker and D. Gerhold, The rise and rise of road transport, 1700-1990 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

D. Bogart, ‘Turnpike Trusts and the transport revolution in 18th-century England’, Explorations in economic history. , Vol. 42 (2005), pp. 479-508.

D. Bogart, ‘Did turnpike trusts increase transportation investment in eighteenth-century England? ’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 65, No. 2 (June 2005), pp. 439-68.

G.W. Crompton, ‘Canals and the industrial revolution’, The journal of transport history. , 3rd Series, Vol. 14 (1993), pp. 93-110.

M. J. Daunton, Progress and poverty : an economic and social history of Britain, 1700-1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), chapter 11.

H.J. Dyos, British transport : an economic survey from the seventeenth century to the twentieth (Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1969).

P. Deane, The first industrial revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1965), chapter 5.

M.J. Freeman, ‘Transport methods in the British cotton during the industrial revolution’, The journal of transport history. , 3rd Series, Vol. 1 (1980), pp. 59-74.

M.J. Freeman, ‘Transport’ in Langton, J. and Morris, R.J. (ed.) Atlas of industrializing Britain 1780-1914 (London: Methuen, 1986).

D. Gerhold, ‘The growth of the London carrying trade, 1681-1838’, The economic history review. , 2nd Ser., Vol. 41 (1988), pp. 392-410.

T.R. Gourvish, T.R. Railways and the British economy 1830-1914 (London: Macmillan, 1980).

G. Hawke, Railways and economic growth in England and Wales, 1840-1870 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970).

G.R. Hawke and J.P.P Higgins, ‘Transport and social overhead capital’ in Floud, R.C. and McCloskey, D.N. (eds.) The economic history of Britain since 1700 : Volume 1 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, first edition, 1981).

F.C. Mather, After the Canal Duke : a study of the industrial estates administered by the trustees of the third Duke of Bridgewater in the age of railway building, 1825-1872 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1970).

P. Mathias, The first industrial nation: An economic history of Britain, 1700-1914 (Second edition. London: Methuen, 1983). pp. 97-109 and pp. 252-265.

P. Maw, T. Wyke, and A. Kidd, ‘Water transport in the industrial age: Commodities and carriers on the Rochdale Canal, 1804-1855’, The journal of transport history. , 3rd Series, Vol. 30 (2009), pp. 200-28.

P. Maw, T. Wyke, and A. Kidd, ‘Canals, rivers, and the industrial city: Manchester’s industrial waterfront, 1790-1850’, The economic history review. , Vol. 65 (2012), pp. 1495-1523.

B.R. Mitchell, ‘The coming of the railway and United Kingdom economic growth’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 24 (1964), pp. 315-36.

J. Nichol, Developing Britain 1740-1900 : the agrarian, transport and industrial revolutions (Oxford: Blackwell, 1981).

E. Pawson, Transport and economy : the turnpike roads of eighteenth century Britain (London: Academic Press, 1977).

R. Szostak , The role of transportation in the Industrial Revolution : a comparison of England and France (London : McGill-Queen's University Press, 1991).

G.L. Turnbull, ‘Provincial road carrying in the England in the eighteenth century’, The journal of transport history. , 2nd Ser., Vol. 4 (1977), pp. 17-39.

G.L. Turnbull, Traffic and transport : an economic history of Pickfords (London: Allen & Unwin, 1979).

G.L. Turnbull, ‘Canals, coal and regional growth during the industrial revolution’, The economic history review. , Vol. 40 (1987), pp. 537-560.

S. Ville, ‘Transport’, in R.C. Floud and P. Johnson (eds), The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , 1700–1860, Volume I: industrialisation, 1700–1860 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), pp. 295–331.

J.R. Ward, The finance of canal building in eighteenth century England (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1974).


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Week 9. Luxury and pleasure: the ‘consumer’ and ‘industrious’ revolutions.

Seminar reading

S. Horrell, ‘Consumption, 1700-1870’ in R. Floud, J. Humprhies, and P. Johnson (eds.) The Cambridge economic history of modern Europe, Volume 1, 1700 to 1870 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014), chapter 8 [Online readings folder, VLE].

N. McKendrick, ‘Consumer revolution in eighteenth-century England: A new view of the role of women and children in the industrial revolution’ in McKendrick, N., Brewer, J., and Plumb, J.H. (eds.) The birth of a consumer society (London: Europa, 1982). Available as an Online Course Reading in the VLE

J. De Vries ‘The industrial revolution and the industrious revolution’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 54 (1994), pp. 249-70. [eJournal].

Introductions

M. Berg, ‘Consumption in eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain’ in R. Floud and P. Johnson (eds) The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , vol. 1 (2004), chapter 13.

S. A. King and J. G. Timmins, Making sense of the Industrial Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001), chapter 5.

J. Rule, The vital century : England's developing economy, 1714-1815 (London: Longman, 1992), pp. 251-263.

P. Hudson, The industrial revolution (London: Arnold 1992), chapter 6, pp. 166-181.

Further reading

The Consumer revolution

M. Berg, ‘In pursuit of luxury: global history and British consumer goods in the eighteenth century’, Past & present. Vol. 182 (2004), pp. 85-142.

M. Berg, Luxury and pleasure in eighteenth-century Britain (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005).

H. Berry, ‘Women, consumption and taste’ in H. Barker and E. Chalus (eds.) Women's history : Britain, 1700-1850 : an introduction (London: Routledge, 2005).

J. Brewer, N. McKendrick and J. H. Plumb (eds.) The birth of a consumer society (London: Europa , 1982), esp. intro and chapter 1

B. Fine and E. Leopold, ‘Consumerism and the industrial revolution’, Social history. , Vol. 15, (1990), pp. 151-179.

J. Humphries, ‘Household economy’, in R. Floud and P. Johnson (eds.) The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain , Vol. 1 (Cambridge: Cambridge Universiry Press, 2004)

L.E. Klein , ‘Politeness for the plebs: consumption and social identity in early eighteenth century England in A. Bermingham and J. Brewer (ed.) The consumption of culture, 1600-1800 : image, object, text (Routledge: London 1995), pp. 362-382.

B. Lemire, Fashion's favourite : the cotton trade and the consumer in Britain, 1660-1800 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991).

J. Mokyr, ‘Is there still life in the pessimist case? Consumption during the industrial revolution’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 48 (1988), pp. 69-92.

M. Overton, Production and consumption in English households, 1600-1750 (London: Routledge, 1990).

E. Robinson, ‘Matthew Boulton and Josiah Wedgewood, apostles of fashion’, Business history. Vol. 28 (1986), pp. 94-118.

C. Shammas, The pre-industrial consumer in England and America (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990).

J. Stobart and A. Hann, ‘Retailing revolution in the eighteenth century: Evidence from North-West England’, Business history. , Vol. 46 (2004), pp. 171-94.

J. Thirsk, Economic policy and projects : the development of a consumer society in early modern England (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978).

A. Vickery, ‘Women and the world of goods: a Lancashire consumer and her possessions, 1751-1781’ in J. Brewer, and R. Porter (eds.) The birth of a consumer society (London: Europa, 1982), esp. intro and chapter 1.

L. Weatherill, Consumer behaviour and material culture in Britain (2nd edition. Routledge, 1996)

L. Weatherill, ‘The meaning of consumer behaviour in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth- century England’ in J. Brewer and R. Porter (eds.) Consumption and the world of goods (London: Routledge, 1993).

L. Weatherill, ‘A possession of one’s own: women and consumer behaviour in England, 1660-1740’ The journal of British studies. , Vol. 25, (1986), pp. 131-156.

C. Walsh, ‘Shop design and the display of goods in eighteenth-century London’, Journal of design history. , Vol. 8 (1995), pp. 157-76.

The Industrious revolution

R.C. Allen and J.L. Weisdorf, ‘Was there an “industrious revolution” before the industrial revolution? An empirical exercise for England, c. 1300–1830’, The economic history review. , Vol. 64 (2011), pp. 715-29.

G. Clark, G. and Y. van der Werf, ‘Work in Progress? The Industrious revolution’, The journal of economic history. , Vol. 58 (1998), pp. 830-43.

C. Muldrew, Food, energy and the creation of industriousness : work and material culture in agrarian England, 1550-1780 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

J. de Vries, ‘The Industrial Revolution and the industrious revolution’, Journal of Economic History , 54 (1994), pp. 249-270.

J. De Vries, The industrious revolution : consumer behavior and the household economy, 1650 to the present (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008).

J.H. Voth, Time and work in England 1750-1830 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2000).

J.H. Voth, ‘The longest years: New estimates of labor input in England, 1760-1830’, Journal of Economic History , Vol. 60 (2001), pp. 1065-82.

Top of page

Week 10. Winners and losers: The standard of living debate

(Lecture only: no seminar this week)

Key reading:

H.J. Voth, ‘Living standards and the urban environment’ in R. Floud and P. Johnson (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain . Vol. 1 Industrialisation, 1700-1860 (Cambridge University Press, 2004), chapter 10.

P. Kirby, ‘The Standard of Living Debate and the Industrial Revolution’, ReFRESH. , Vol. 25 (1997) [http://www.ehs.org.uk/society/refresh.asp].

C. Feinstein, ‘Pessimism perpetuated: Real wages and the standard of living in Britain during and after the industrial revolution’, Journal of Economic History , Vol. 58 (1998), pp. 625-58.

Introductory accounts

E. Hobsbawm, Industry and empire: from 1750 to the present day (London: Penguin, 1969), chapter 4.

P. Hudson, The industrial revolution (London: Arnold 1992), pp. 166-200

D. Meredith and D. Oxley, ‘Nutrition and health, 1700-1870’ in in R. Floud, J. Humprhies, and P. Johnson (eds.) The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain : vol 1, 1700-1870 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014).

C. More, Understanding the Industrial Revolution New York: Routledge, 2000), chapter 7.

J. Rule, The labouring classes in early industrial England, 1750-1850 (London: Longman, 1986), chapters 1-3.

J. Rule, Albion's people : English society, 1714-1815 (London: Longman, 1992), chapter 7.

Classic Optimist accounts:

T. S. Ashton, ‘The standard of life of the workers in England 1790-1830’ The journal of economic history. , supplement No. 9 (1949), pp. 19-38.

R. M. Hartwell, ‘The rising standard of living in England 1800-1850’, The economic history review. , Vol. 13, (1961), pp. 397-416.

R.M. Hartwell, ‘The Standard of Living: An Answer to Pessimists’, Economic History Review , Vol. 16 (1963), pp. 135-46.

P. H. Lindert and J. G. Williamson, ‘English workers’ living standards: A new look’, Economic History Review , Vol. 36 (1983), pp. 1-25.

E. Griffin, Liberty's dawn : a people's history of the Industrial Revolution (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), chapter 1

Classic Pessimist accounts

N. F. R. Crafts, ‘Some Dimensions of the 'Quality of Life' during the British Industrial Revolution,” Economic History Review , Vol. 50 (1997), pp. 617-39.

C. Feinstein, ‘Pessimism perpetuated: Real wages and the standard of living in Britain during and after the industrial revolution’, Journal of Economic History, Vol. 58 (1998), pp. 625-58.

E. J. Hobsbawm, ‘The British standard of living 1790-1850’ Economic History Review , Vol. 10 (1957), pp. 46-68.

E.J. Hobsbawm, ‘The Standard of Living during the Industrial Revolution: A Discussion’, Economic History Review , Vol. 16 (1963), pp. 119-134.

Many of the older articles listed here (and others) are included in:

A.J. Taylor (ed.) The standard of living in Britain in the Industrial Revolution (London: Methuen, 1975).

Regional / sector studies:

J.C. Brown, ‘The condition of England and the standard of living: cotton textiles in the northwest, 1806-50’, Journal of Economic History , Vol. 50 (1990), pp. 591-614.

R. Cage, ‘The standard of living debate: Glasgow 1800-1850’, Journal of Economic History , Vol. 43 (1983), pp. 175-182.

G. Clark, ‘Farm wages and living standards in the industrial revolution: England, 1670-1869’ Economic History Review , Vol. 54 (2001), pp. 477-505.

E. H. Hunt, ‘Industrialisation and regional inequality: wages in Britain 1760-1914’ Journal of Economic Hist ory , Vol. 40 (1986), pp. 935-966.

E. H. Hunt and R. W. Botham, ‘Wages in Britain during the industrial revolution’, Economic History Review , Vol. 40 (1987), pp. 380-399.

S. Nicholas and D. Oxley, ‘The living standards of women during the industrial revolution 1795-1820’, Economic History Review , Vol. 46 (1993), pp. 723-49.

L. D. Schwarz, ‘The standard of living in the long run: London, 1700-1860’, Economic History Review , Vol. 38 (1985), pp. 24-41.

S. Williams, ‘Poor relief, labourers’ households and living standards in rural England c .1770-1834: a Bedfordshire case study’, Economic History Review , Vol. 58 (2005), pp. 485-519.

Heights and Nutrition

* F. Cinnirella, ‘Optimists or pessimists? A reconsideration of nutritional status in Britain, 1740-1865’, European review of economic history , Vol. 12 (2008), pp. 325-54.

R. Floud, K. Watcher, and A. Gregory, Height, health and history : nutritional status in the United Kingdom, 1750-1980 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990).

I. Gazeley and S. Horrell, ‘Nutrition in the English agricultural labourer’s household over the course of the long nineteenth century’, The economic history review. , Vol. 66 (2013), pp. 757-84.

P. Johnson and S. Nicholas, ‘Male and female living standards in England and Wales, 1812-1857: Evidence from criminal height records’, Economic History Review , Vol. 46 (1993), pp. 470-81.

J. Komlos, ‘The secular trend in the biological standard of living in the United Kingdom, 1730-1860’, Economic History Review , Vol. 46 (1993), pp. 115-144.

J. Komlos, ‘Nutrition, population growth and the industrial revolution in England’, Social Science History , Vol. 14 (1990), pp. 69-91.

D. Meredith and D. Oxley, ‘Nutrition and health, 1700-1870’ in in R. Floud, J. Humprhies, and P. Johnson (eds.) The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain : vol 1, 1700-1870 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014).

* D. Meredith and D. Oxley, ‘Food and fodder: Feeding England, 1700-1900’, Past & present. , Vol. 222 (2014), pp. 163-214.

C. Muldrew, Food, energy and the creation of industriousness : work and material culture in agrarian England, 1550-1780 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

S. Nicholas and R. H. Steckel, ‘Heights and Living Standards of English Workers During the Early Years of Industrialization, 1770 - 1815', The Journal of Economic History , Vol. 51 (December1991), pp. 937 - 57.

P. Sharpe, ‘Explaining the short stature of the poor: Chronic childhood disease and growth in nineteenth-century England’, The economic history review. , Vol. 65 (2012), pp. 1475-94.

Mortality and working hours

P. Huck, ‘Infant mortality and the living standards of English workers during the industrial revolution’, Journal of Economic History , Vol. 55 (1995), pp. 528-50.

L. Schwarz, ‘Custom, wages and workload in England during industrialization’, Past & present. , Vol. 197 (2007), pp. 143-76.

S.R.S. Szreter and G. Mooney, G., ‘Urbanisation, mortality and the standard of living debate’, Economic History Review , Vol. 51 (1998), pp. 84-112.

H.J. Voth, Time and work in England 1750-1830 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2000).

H. J. Voth, ‘The longest years: new estimates of labor input in England, 1760-1830’, Journal of Economic History , Vol. 61 (2001), pp. 1065-1082.

Consumption and budgets

R.M. Hartwell, ‘The Standard of Living: An Answer to Pessimists’, The economic history review. , Vol. 16 (1963), pp. 135-46.

E.J. Hobsbawm, ‘The Standard of Living during the Industrial Revolution: A Discussion’, The economic history review. , Vol. 16 (1963), pp. 119-134

S. Horrell and J. Humphries, ‘Old questions, new data and alternative perspectives: families’ living standards during the industrial revolution’ Journal of Economic History , Vol . 52 (1992), pp. 849-880.

J. Mokyr, ‘Is there still life in the pessimist case? Consumption during the industrial revolution’, Journal of Economic History , Vol. 48, (1988), pp. 69-92.

This list was last updated on 21/01/2016