Leeds University Library

COMM5735M
Module Reading List

Individual Directed Study (New Media), 2017/18, Semester 2
Helen Thornham
h.thornham@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue


Key Texts

There are two key books used throughout this module. The library has copies of these books, but they will be useful throughout the degree.

Flew, T. (2008) New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge.

Manovich,L. (2001) The language of new media. Cambridge Mass. MIT Press

Berry, D (2011) The philosophy of software : code and mediation in the digital age. London. Palgrave MacMillan

Berry, D. (ed. 2012) Understanding digital humanities. London. Palgrave Macmillan

Gehl, R (2014) Reverse engineering social media : software, culture, and political economy in new media capitalism. Philadelphia. Temple University Press

Additional reading for each week is generally found in online journals such as The Information Society, New Media and Society, Media Culture and Society and Convergence. These journals can be accessed, downloaded and printed through the library. Students need to familiarise themselves with this process.

Other useful free access journals:

First Monday, www.firstmonday.org FibreCulture, www.fibreculturejournal.org GameStudies, www.gamestudies.org Ephemera www.ephemeraweb.org

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Week 1. INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS Dr. Helen Thornham

XX

What is new media? How do we understand it? This week introduces students to the central questions of the module. We touch on a range of new media and introduce a number of terms and concepts we will revisit over the course of the module.

Key Reading:

Kember, S. & Zylinska, J. (2012)’ “What’s New about New Media?’ and a Few Other Old Debates’ in Life after new media : mediation as a vital process. Cambridge Mass. MIT Press p 3-13

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Introduction to New Media’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 1-21 & 21-30

Baym, N. K (2010) ‘Making New Media Make Sense’ in Personal Connections in the Digital Age, Polity. Cambridge pp22-50

Gehl, R (2014) The Archive and the Processor in Reverse engineering social media : software, culture, and political economy in new media capitalism.pp XX

Additional Reading:

Boyd, D. and Ellison, N. (2007) Social Network Sites: Definition, History in Journal of computer-mediated communication [electronic resource]., 13 (1), article 11. Available online at http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/boyd.ellison.html

Castells, M. (2009) The Rise of the Network Society, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Social Networking Media’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘What is the Internet?’ in New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge, pp164

Manovich, L. (2001) ‘The Myth of the Digital’ and ‘The Myth of Interactivity’ in The language of new media MIT Press, pp52-62

Silverstone, R. (1999) What’s New about New Media? New Media and Society 1(1) pp10-82 also available at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/swiss/archive/Silverstone.pdf

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Week 2. BEYOND DIGITISATION AND CONVERGENCE Dr. Helen Thornham

These two central concepts seem to encapsulate what is new about new media. ‘Digitisation’ speaks to the increase of forms of media, and the easy accessibility of them. ‘Convergence’ seems to explain the merging of these different media forms, and the multiple ways they are used and experienced. This week we explore these two concepts, using the smart phone as an example and asking what they may reveal, and hide, about new media. Together these terms seem to tell us something about access, use and the easy availability of information.

Key Reading:

Jenkins, H. (2006) ‘Introduction’ in Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide New York. New York University Press pp1-25

Bassett, C., Hartmann, M. & O’Riordan, K.(2008) ‘After Convergence, What Connects? In Fibreculture journal 13 accessible at http://thirteen.fibreculturejournal.org/

Suchman

Van House

Additional Reading:

Jenkins, H. and Deuze, M. (2008),‘Editorial: Convergence Culture’ in Convergence : the international journal of research into new media technologies. 14:1 pp5-12

van Dijck, J. (2009) Users Like You? Theorizing Agency in User-Generated Content in Media, culture & society. 31(1) pp. 41-58

Zimmer, M. (ed.) (2008) ‘Critical Perspectives on Web 2.0’ in First Monday [electronic resource]. 13:3 special edition. See

http://www.firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/view/263

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Week 3. PRODUSAGE/UGC Dr. Helen Thornham

14th October

This week we explore two further concepts relating to network cultures, specifically in relation to agency and creativity. Is UGC (user generated content) still a useful term? Should we be using a concept like ‘produsage’ instead? We ask what each term suggests about new media engagement, about agency, about creativity, authorship, ethics.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Participatory Media Cultures’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 106-143

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘User-Generated Content: we are all fans now’ in New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge. pp221-225

Additional Reading:

Thornham, H & McRobbie, A (2014) Claiming Content and Constructing Users: UGC and BBC Blast’ in Bragg, Kehily & Buckingam (ed.) Youth cultures in the age of global media Palgrave MacMillian pp 186-202

van Diijck, J. (2009) Users Like You? Theorizing Agency in User-Generated Content in Media, culture & society. 31(1) pp 41-58

Andrejevic, M. (2011) 'The work that affective economics does' in Cultural studies., 25, 4-5, pp604-620

Bruns, A. (2008) Blogs, Wikipedia, Second Life and Beyond: from production to produsage, New York: Peter Lang. Some chapters available online at http://produsage.org/files/Produsage%20-%20Introduction.pdf

Wardle, C. & Williams, A. (2010) ‘Beyond User-Generated Content: A production study examining the ways in which UGC is used at the BBC’ in Media, culture & society. 32:5 pp781-799

Hesmondhalgh, D. (2010) ‘User-Generated Content, free labour and the Cultural Industries in Ephemera 10:3/4 pp267-284 available at http://www.ephemeraweb.org/journal/10-3/10-3hesmondhalgh.pdf

Roberts, B. (2009) ‘Beyond the ‘Networked Public Sphere’: Politics, Participation and Technics in Web 2.0’ in the Fibreculture journal 14 accessed at: http://fourteen.fibreculturejournal.org/fcj-093-beyond-the-networked-public-sphere-politics-participation-and-technics-in-web-2-0/

Thornham H. & McFarlane, A. (2012) ‘Fantasies of Creative Connectivity in BBC Blast’ in Popple, S. and Thornham, H. (eds) Content cultures : transformations of user generated content in Public Service Broadcasting London: IBTauris

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Week 4. NETWORK CULTURES Dr. Helen Thornham

XX

Along with networks, are network cultures – the practices and experiences that we engage in when we are ‘networked’. From gaming to social media, from modding to mediation, network cultures refer to the different modes of engagement we now experience with one another, and with the media with which we interact. This week therefore deals with the kinds of leisure and pleasure practices that exist in the digital, asking how, why, and if we should value such practices.

Key Reading:

XX

Additional Reading:

Kennedy, H. W.(2007) ‘Female Quake Players & the Politics of Identity' in T. Krzywinska & B. Atkins eds. Videogame, player, text Manchester University Press pp 120-139

(Also in Giddens, Seth and Lister, Martin (ed) (2011) The new media and technocultures reader London. Routledge pp201-215)

Terranova, T. (2011) ‘Free Labour’ in Giddens, Seth and Lister, Martin (ed) (2011) The new media and technocultures reader London. Routledge pp350-369

(also in her book (2004) Network culture : politics for the information age. London. Pluto press AND in the journal (2000) Social text. 18:2 pp33-58

Taylor, T.L

Newman, J. (2008) ‘Playing Together: Videogames and Talk’ in Playing with videogames, London: Routledge, pp23-46

Kücklich, J. (2005) ‘Precious Playbour: Modders and the Digital Games Industry’ in Fibreculture journal 5: http://journal.fibreculture.org/issue5/index.html

Postigo, H (2008) ‘Video Game Appropriation through Modification: Attitudes Concerning Intellectual Property among Modders and Fans’ in Convergence : the international journal of research into new media technologies. 14:1 pp59-74

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Week 5. PLATFORMS &THE PUBLIC SPHERE Dr. Helen Thornham

28th October

This week we concentrate on the democratic potentials of network cultures. With the advent of digital media, anyone can post comments, upload material and debate. We address issues around the claims made about new media being the new public sphere, to radically changing knowledge-making practices. We investigate these claims here.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Citizen Journalism’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 143-168

Gillespie, T. (2010) ‘The Politics of ‘Platforms’ in New media and society. 12:3 pp347-364

Gehl R (2011) The Archive and the Processor: The Internal Logic of Web 2.0 in New media and society. 13:8 pp1228-1244

Additional Reading:

Van Dijck, J. (2013) ‘’Disassembling Platforms, Reassembling Sociality’ in The culture of connectivity : a critical history of social media Oxford University Press. Oxford pp 24-45

Papacharissi, Z (2010) ‘The Public Sphere, Expired? On the Democratizing Potential of Convergent Technologies’ in A private sphere : democracy in a digital age. Cambridge. Polity pp112-131

Buchstein, H. (2007) ‘Bytes that Bite: The Internet and Deliberative Democracy’ in Constellations. 4:2 pp 248-263

Freedman, D. (2012) ‘Outsourcing internet regulation’, in Curran, J., Fenton, N. and Freedman, D. (eds) Misunderstanding the Internet, London: Routledge

Lessig, L. (2006) Code 2.0 , New York: Basic Books

Zittrain, J. (2009) The future of the Internet : and how to stop it, London: Penguin

Collins, R. (2009) Three myths of internet governance : making sense of networks, governance and regulation, Exeter: Intellect Books, pp. 51-77

Murray, A. (2010) Information Technology Law, Oxford: Oxford Uuniversity Press, pp. 55-82

Wright, S.and Street, J. (2007) ‘Democracy, deliberation and design: the case of online discussion forums’ in New media and society.: 9 pp 849-869

Papacharissi, Z. & de Fatima Oliveira, M (2012) ‘Affective News and Networked Publics: The Rhythms of News Storytelling on #Egypt’ in the Journal of communication. 62:2 pp 266-282

Lim,M (2012) ‘Clicks, Cabs, and Coffee Houses: Social Media and Oppositional Movements in Egypt, 2004-2011’ in the Journal of communication. 62:2 pp 231-248

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Week 6. CULTURES OF SELF-REPRESENTATION Dr. Helen Thornham

4th November

Ever since Sherry Turkle’s celebratory proclamations about cyberspace in the 90s, where she claimed that we could be whoever we wanted to be in cyberspace, questions around identity, representations and performance have abounded. Using Facebook as an example, we address these issues: We can create ourselves, and re-create ourselves online, however we want. Or can we? This week we explore the limits, consequences and constructions of online selves.

Key Reading:

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘Identities and Communities online’, ‘being anonymous’ & ‘belonging’ New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge. pp209-216

Turkle, S. (1995) ‘Identity in the age of the Internet’ in Life on The Screen. New York. Simon and Schuster publications pp9-26

Additional Reading:

Thumim, N (2012) Self-representation and digital culture, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Chapter 1: Introduction: Self-representation and Digital Culture. Most of this available online at http://www.palgraveconnect.com/pc/mediaculture2012/browse/inside/9781137265135.html

Kennedy, H. (2006) 'Beyond anonymity, or future directions for Internet identity research' in New media and society. vol 8 no 6 pp859-876.

Also available in Thornham, S., Bassett C. and Marris, P(ed.) (2009) Media Studies: A Reader 3rd Edition Edinburgh. Edinburgh University Press pp839-854

Hearn A. (2010) ‘Structuring Feeling: Web 2.0 OnlineRanking and Rating, and the digital ‘reputation’ economy’ in Ephemera: Theory and Politics in Organization 10:3/4 pp421-438. Available online at http://www.ephemeraweb.org/journal/10-3/10-3hearn.pdf

Davis, J. (2010) Architecture of the Personal Interactive Homepage: Constructing the Self through MySpace. New media and society. 12(7) pp1103-1119

Wynn, E. and Katz, J.E. (1997) Hyperbole over cyberspace: Self-presentation and social boundaries in Internet home pages and discourse, Information society. 13(4) pp 297-327.

Mendelson, A. and Papacharissi, Z. (2011) ‘Look At Us: Collective Narcissism in College Student Facebook Photo Galleries’ in Papacharissi, Z (ed) A networked self : identity, community and culture on social network sites. London. Routledge 251-274

Papacharissi, Z (ed) A networked self : identity, community and culture on social network sites. London. Routledge 251-274

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Week 7. RE-MIX, FREE AND GIFT CULTURES Dr. Helen Thornham

11th November

Following week 3, where we discussed UGC and produsage, this week we explore the wider implications of free tools and facilities for expression, for use and for creativity. What are the implications and consequences of free software, for example? From the Tesco clubcard to downloadable game and music software, to Wikipedia itself as the claimed democratic platform, we ask what these emerging cultures might mean for democracy, for citizenship, for copyright, for ethics, for capitalism.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘The Global Knowledge Economy’’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 193-218

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘Wiki worlds and Web 2.0’ in New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge. pp204-209

Barbrook, R. (1998) ‘The High-Tech Gift Economy’ in First Monday [electronic resource]. 3:12 available at http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/631/552

Bassett, C. (2013), ‘Silence, Delirium, Lies’, First Monday [electronic resource]., Vol. 18, No.3-4.  http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/4617/3420

Additional Reading:

Atton, C. (2004) An alternative Internet, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

Van Dijck, J. (2013) ‘Wikipedia and the Neutrality Principle’ in The culture of connectivity : a critical history of social media Oxford University Press. Oxford pp 132-154

Barbrook, R. reflections on the high tech gift economy. See http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/1517/1432

Popple, S. (2011) “It’s not really our content”: The Moving Image and Media History in the Digital Archive Age’ in Park, Jankowski and Jones (ed.) The long history of new media : technology, historiography, and contextualizing newness. New York. Peter Lang Publishers pp317-333

Berry, D. (2008) Copy, rip, burn : the politics of copyleft and open source, London: Pluto Press

Soderberg, J. (2005) Hacking capitalism : the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) movement, London: Routledge

Taylor, P. (2005) ‘From hackers to hactivists: speed bumps on the global information superhighway?’, New media and society., 7(5), pp625-646

Bennett, W.L. & Sederberg, A. (2011) ‘Digital media and the personalization of collective action’, Information, communication and society. 14(6) pp770-779

Mittell, J. (2013) ‘Wikis and Participatory Fandom’ in Delwiche and Henderson (ed.) The participatory cultures handbook, London, Routledge pp35-53

Van Dijck (2013) Wikipedia and the Neutrality Principle’ in van Dijck The culture of connectivity : a critical history of social media. Oxford. Oxford University Press pp132-149

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Week 8. TROLLING, FLAMING, HACKING Dr. Helen Thornham

18th November

Key Reading:

Bartlett et al. (2014) Mysogyny on Twitter. DEMOS accessed at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/mysogyny

Hutchens, M et al (2014) ‘How Could You Think That?!?!: Understandings Intentions to Engage in Political Flaming’ in New media and society. DOI: 10.1177/1461444814522947

Additional Reading:

Bartlett, J (2014) The dark net : inside the digital underworld. London. William Heineman

Coleman, G. (2015) Hacker, hoaxer, whistleblower, spy : the many faces of Anonymous. London. Verso

Coleman, G (2012) Coding freedom : the ethics and aesthetics of hacking. Princeton. Princeton University Press

Weinstein, E & Selman R (2014) Digital Stress: Adolescents’ Personal Accounts in New media and society. DOI: 10.1177/1461444814543989

Davis, K et al (2014) “I was Bullied too: Stories of Bullying and Coping in an Online Community’ in Information, communication and society. DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2014.952657

Hmielowski, J et al (2014) ‘Living in an Age of Online Incivility: Examining the Conditional Indirect Effects of Online Discussion on Political Flaming in Information, communication and society. Vol. 17, No. 10, 1196–1211, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2014.899609

Bishop, J (2014) Representations of ‘trolls’ in mass media communication: a review of media-texts and moral panics relating to ‘internet trolling’ Int. J. Web Based Communities, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2014 pp 7-24

25th November.

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Week 9. EVERYDAY DIGITALS, NATIVES AND LITERATES Dr. Helen Thornham

We are all mobile, we are all digital. We are compulsive users of smart phone technologies, apps and other technologies. We are fast, frequent and even native users of technologies. The terms used to talk about digital technology – ubiquity, plethora, invisible, speed – can also be applied to us. Does this make us literate? Competent? Expert? This week we look at some of the debates around literacy to understand ourselves.

Key Reading:

Thornham, H & McFarlane, A (2011) ‘Discourses of the Digital Native: Use, non-use, and perceptions of use in BBC Blast’ in Information, communication and society. 14:2 pp 258-279

Pink, S.(2012) ‘The Digital Places of Everyday Life’ in Situating everyday life : practices and places. Sage. London. pp123-141

Additional Reading:

Thornham, Helen & McFarlane, Angela (2014) ‘Claiming Content and Constructing Users: User-Generated Content and BBC Blast’in Bragg, Kehily & Buckingam (ed.) Youth cultures in the age of global media Palgrave MacMillian pp 186-202

Turkle, S (2008) ‘Always-on/Always-on-you: The Tethered self’ in KatzJ (ed.) Handbook of mobile communication studies MIT Press. Cambridge Mass. pp121-139

Bassett, C. et al. (2013) Expertise: A Scoping Study http://www.communitiesandculture.org/files/2013/04/Sussex-scoping-report.pdf

Ito M. et al (2009) Hanging Out, Messing Around and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media. Available online at http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/full_pdfs/hanging_out.pdf

Park, D., Jankowski, N. & Jones, S. (2011) ‘Introduction: History and New Media’ in Park, Jankowski & Jones (ed) The long history of new media : technology, historiography, and contextualizing newness. New York. Peter Lang Publishers pp xi- xviii

boyd, d (2014) It's complicated : the social lives of networked teens. Yale. Yale University Press.

Thonrham, H (2011) Ethnographies of the videogame : gender, narrative and praxis. Basingstoke. Ashgate

Tapscott, D (1998) Growing up digital : the rise of the net generation. New York. McGraw Hill Press

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Week 10 PRIVACY, REPUTATION AND TRUST Dr Helen Thornham

2nd December

Following the previous weeks, we address some of the implications online constructions of self and re-mix cultures may have for issues of privacy, reputation and trust. Using news media and social media as examples, we ask whether we’re living in reputation economy and what that might mean. What do companies do with data generated through digital and networked databases? Does reputation now have economic value? What, if anything, is done with all the data we input about ourselves everyday?

Key Reading:

Wessels, B. (2012). Identification and the practices of identity and privacy in everyday digital communication. New media and society., 1461444812450679.

boyd, d. (2008) ‘Facebook's Privacy Trainwreck: Exposure, Invasion, and Social Convergence’ in Convergence : the international journal of research into new media technologies. 14:1 pp13-20

Young, A. L., & Quan-Haase, A. (2013). Privacy protection strategies on Facebook: the Internet privacy paradox revisited. Information, communication and society., 16(4), 479-500.

Additional Reading:

Nissenbaum, H. ‘Personal Data: The Logic of Practice,’ in The Economist http://www.nyu.edu/projects/nissenbaum/papers/economist.pdf

Nissenbaum, H. & Howe, D (2009) ‘TrackMeNot: Resisting Surveillance in Web Search’ accessed at http://www.nyu.edu/projects/nissenbaum/papers/HoweNissenbaum.pdf

boyd, d. (2010) ‘Making Sense of Privacy and Publicity’ keynote address SWSX accessed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kl0VANhnvxk

Dean, J. (2008) ‘Communicative Capitalism: Circulation and the Foreclosure of Politics’ in Boler, Megan (ed.) Digital media and democracy : tactics in hard times Cambridge Mass.: MIT Press pp101-123

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Internet Law, policy and governance’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 218-247

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddens, S., Grant, I. & Kelly, K. (2008) ‘Intellectual Property Rights, determined and determining’ in New Media: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, London: Routledge. pp189-191

boyd, d. & Marwick, A. (2011) ‘Social Privacy in Networked Publics: teens’ attitudes, practices & strategies, paper presented at The Oxford Internet Institute’s A Decade of the Internet, September 22, 2011. Available online at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1925128.

Arvidsson, A. (2011) ‘General Sentiment: how value and affect converge in the information economy’, Social Science Research Network. Available online at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1815031

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Week 11. SUMMARIES AND WORKSHOPS Dr. Helen Thornham

XX

What is new media? How do we understand it? We started this module with these two questions, and this week, we return to them. While the technology of new media may be new, many of the concerns and issues raised in the module are ongoing. This week we ask how new is new media? This week will also offer students the chance to think about their final assessment and discuss issues for next term. There will be a short summary lecture, Q&A session and workshops.

Key Reading:

Flew, T. (2008) ‘Conclusion’ in New Media: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp 247-255

Lally, E. (2011) ‘The Domestic Ecology of Objects’ in Giddens, Seth and Lister, Martin (ed) (2011) The new media and technocultures reader London. Routledge pp423-437

Additional Reading:

Bassett, C. (2008) ‘New Maps for Old? The Cultural Stakes of Web 2.0 in Fibrecultures Journal 13 accessed at http://thirteen.fibreculturejournal.org/fcj-088-new-maps-for-old-the-cultural-stakes-of-2-0/

Manovich, L. (2001) ‘The Myth of the Digital’ and ‘The Myth of Interactivity’ in The Language of New Media MIT Press pp52-62

Park, D., Jankowski, N. & Jones, S. (2011) ‘Introduction: History and New Media’ in Park, Jankowski & Jones (ed) The long history of new media : technology, historiography, and contextualizing newness. New York. Peter Lang Publishers pp xi- xviii

This list was last updated on 06/10/2015