Leeds University Library

CLAS3595
Heroines: Module Reading List

Heroines: Representations of Mythological Women from Antiquity to the Present, 2017/18, Semester 1, 2
Dr Paul White
p.m.white@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

PRIMARY READING

Texts marked * should be purchased (if possible) before the start of Semester 1.

Anouilh, Jean. 1967. ‘Medea’ in: The collected plays. Vol. 2. Methuen.

Atwood, Margaret, et al. “Helen of Troy: Modern Poetry Selection” [VLE]

Boccaccio, Giovanni. 2011. ‘Dido’ in: On famous women. Translated by Guido A Guarino. New York: Italica Press.

Chaucer. 2001. “The Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea.” Text and modern English version online at eChaucer: http://ummutility.umm.maine.edu/necastro/chaucer/texts/lgw/lgw4hypsipylemedea07.html

Corneille, Pierre. 2015. Medea [Selections] Translated by P. White. [VLE]

*Euripides. 2008. ‘Medea’, ‘Hippolytus’ and ‘Helen’ in: Medea and other plays. Translated by James Morwood. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

Giraudoux, Jean. 1955. Tiger at the gates = La Guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu. Translated by Christopher Fry. New York: Oxford University Press.

Jodelle, Etienne. 2015. The Death of Dido [Selections] Translated by P. White. [VLE]

Marlowe, Christopher. 2003. ‘Dido, Queen of Carthage’ in: The complete plays. Edited by Frank Romany and Robert Lindsey. London, England; New York, N.Y.: Penguin Books.

*Ovid. 1990. ‘Phaedra’, ‘Dido’, ‘Medea’, ‘Helen’, in: Heroides. Translated by H. Isbell. London: Penguin Books.

Racine, Jean. 2000. ‘Phaedra’ in: Three plays : Andromache, Phaedra, Athaliah. Translated by Tim Chilcott. Ware: Wordsworth.

*Seneca. 2010. ‘Medea’, ‘Phaedra’ in: Six tragedies. Translated by E. Wilson. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

Virgil. 2003. ‘Book 4’, in: The Aeneid. Translated by David West. London; New York: Penguin Books.

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SECONDARY READING

Medea

 

Allan, William. 2002. Euripides : Medea. London: Duckworth.

Charpentier, F. 1995. “Médée Figure de La Passion d’Euripide À l’Age Classique.” In Prémices et floraison de l'Age classique : mélanges en l'honneur de Jean Jehasse, 387–406. Publications de l’Université de Saint-Étienne.

Clauss, James Joseph, and Sarah Iles Johnston, eds. 1997. Medea : essays on Medea in myth, literature, philosophy, and art. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.

Davis, P. J. 2012. “‘A Simple Girl’?: Medea in Ovid ‘Heroides’ 12.” Ramus. 41 (1/2): 33–48. Available online: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9155397&fileId=S0048671X00000242

Fumaroli, Marc. 1990. “De Médée À Phèdre: Naissance et Mise À Mort de La Tragédie Cornélienne.” In Héros et orateurs : rhétorique et dramaturgie cornéliennes, 493–518. Geneva: Droz.

Heavey, Katherine. 2015. The early modern Medea : Medea in English literature, 1558-1688.

Hinds, Stephen. 1993. “Medea in Ovid: Scenes from the Life of an Intertextual Heroine.” Materiali E Discussioni per L’analisi Dei Testi Classici, no. 30: 9–47.

Lawrence, Stuart. 1997. “Audience Uncertainty and Euripides’ Medea.” Hermes. 125 (1): 49–55.

McDermott, Emily A. 2010. Euripides' Medea : the incarnation of disorder. Penn State Press.

Morse, Ruth. 1996. The medieval Medea. Cambridge [England]; Rochester, NY, USA: D.S. Brewer.

Percival, Florence. 1998. Chaucer's legendary good women. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Trinacty, Christopher. 2007. “Seneca’s Heroides: Elegy in Seneca’s Medea.” The Classical Journal. 103 (1): 63–78.

Taplin, Oliver, Fiona Macintosh, and Edith Hall, eds. 2000. Medea in performance 1500-2000. Oxford: Legenda.

Walsh, Lisl. 2012. “The Metamorphoses of Seneca’s Medea.” Ramus. 41 (1–2): 71–93. Available online: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9155403&fileId=S0048671X00000266

Wygant, Amy. 2007. Medea, magic, and modernity in France : stages and histories, 1553-1797. Aldershot, England; Burlington, VT: Ashgate Pub. Co.

Dido

Buckley, Emma. 2011. “‘Live False Aeneas!’Marlowe’s Dido, Queen of Carthage and the Limits of Translation.” Classical Receptions Journal 3 (2): 129–147.

Burden, Michael, ed. 1998. A Woman Scorn’d: Responses to the Dido Myth. London: Faber.

Casali, Sergio. 2004. “Further Voices in Ovid ‘Heroides 7.’” Hermathena, no. 177/178: 147–64. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Desmond, Marilynn. 1993. “When Dido Reads Vergil-Gender and Intertextuality in Ovid ‘Heroides’ 7.” Helios 20 (1): 56–68.

———. 1994. Reading Dido : gender, textuality, and the medieval Aeneid. Minneapolis, Minn.: University of Minnesota Press. http://site.ebrary.com/id/10159399.

Fantham, Elaine. 1975. “Virgil’s Dido and Seneca’s Tragic Heroines.” Greece and Rome. 22 (1): 1–10.

Franklin, Margaret Ann. 2006. Boccaccio's heroines : power & virtue in Renaissance society. Women and Gender in the Early Modern World. Aldershot: Ashgate. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Gill, Roma. 1977. “Marlowe’s Virgil: Dido Queene of Carthage.” Review of English studies. 28 (110): 141–55.

Gutting, E. 2006. “Marriage in the Aeneid: Venus, Vulcan, and Dido.” Classical Philology. 101 (3): 263–79. doi:10.1086/511017.

“Jodelle, Didon se sacrifiant.” 2014. Fabula Colloques en ligne. Available online: http://www.fabula.org/colloques/document2250.phphttp://www.fabula.org/colloques/sommaire2249.php.

Kallendorf, Craig. 1985. “Boccaccio’s Dido and the Rhetorical Criticism of Virgil’s‘ Aeneid.’” Studies in philology. 82 (4): 401–415.

Kinney, Clare R. 2000. “Epic Transgression and the Framing of Agency in ‘Dido Queen of Carthage.’” Studies in English literature, 1500-1900. 40 (2): 261–76. doi:10.2307/1556128.

Martin, René, ed. 1990. Enée et Didon : naissance, fonctionnement et survie d'un mythe. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

Potter, Lucy. 2009. “Marlowe’s Dido: Virgilian or Ovidian?” Notes and queries. 56 (4): 540–44. doi:10.1093/notesj/gjp201.

Stump, Donald. 2000. “Marlowe’s Travesty of Virgil: Dido and Elizabethan Dreams of Empire.” Comparative drama. 34 (1): 79–107. doi:10.1353/cdr.2000.0035.

Ternaux, Jean-Claude, and Sabine Lardon. 2013. Jodelle : Didon se sacrifiant. Neuilly: Atlande.

 

Phaedra

Armstrong, Rebecca. 2006. Cretan women : Pasiphae, Ariadne, and Phaedra in Latin poetry. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

Fantham, Elaine. 1975. “Virgil’s Dido and Seneca’s Tragic Heroines.” Greece and Rome. 22 (1): 1–10.

Fumaroli, Marc. 1990. “De Médée À Phèdre: Naissance et Mise À Mort de La Tragédie Cornélienne.” In Héros et orateurs : rhétorique et dramaturgie cornéliennes, 493–518. Geneva: Droz.

James, E. D, and Gillian Jondorf. 1994. Racine : Phèdre. Cambridge; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Mayer, Roland. 2002. Seneca : Phaedra. London: Duckworth.

Mills, Sophie. 2002. Euripides : Hippolytus. London: Duckworth.

Roisman, Hanna. 1999. Nothing is as it seems : the tragedy of the implicit in Euripides' Hippolytus. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

Helen

Austin, Norman. 1994. Helen of Troy and her shameless phantom. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Backès, Jean Louis. 1984. Le mythe d'Hélène. Clermont-Ferrand [France: Adosa.]

Belfiore, Elizabeth. 1980. “Ovid’s Encomium of Helen.” The Classical Journal. 76 (2): 136–148.

Blondell, Ruby. 2013. Helen of Troy : beauty, myth, devastation.

Drinkwater, Megan O. 2013. “An Amateur’s Art: Paris and Helen in Ovid’s Heroides.” Classical Philology. 108 (2): 111–25. doi:10.1086/671416.

Gumpert, Matthew. 2001. Grafting Helen : the abduction of the classical past. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Korzeniowska, Victoria B. 2003. Giraudoux : "La guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu.".. London: Grant & Cutler.

Lewis, Roy. 1971. Giraudoux : "La guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu.". London: Edward Arnold.

Maguire, Laurie E. 2009. Helen of Troy : from Homer to Hollywood. Chichester, U.K.; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.

Mazurek, Elizabeth Forbis. 2006. “Elegy and Epic and the Recognition of Paris: Ovid Heroides 16.” Arethusa. 39 (1): 47–70. doi:10.1353/are.2006.0004.

Suzuki, Mihoko. 1989. Metamorphoses of Helen : authority, difference, and the epic. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Classical heroines: general

Bolton, M. C. 2009. “Gendered Spaces in Ovid’s Heroides.” The classical world. 102 (3): 273–90. doi:10.1353/clw.0.0099.

Franklin, Margaret Ann. 2006. Boccaccio's heroines : power & virtue in Renaissance society. Women and Gender in the Early Modern World. Aldershot: Ashgate.

Fulkerson, Laurel. 2009. The Ovidian heroine as author : reading, writing, and community in the Heroides. Cambridge Univ Pr.

Hagedorn, Suzanne C. 2004. Abandoned women : rewriting the classics in Dante, Boccaccio, and Chaucer. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Lindheim, Sara H. 2003. Mail and female : epistolary narrative and desire in Ovid's Heroides. Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin Press.

McClure, Laura. 1999. Spoken like a woman : speech and gender in Athenian drama. Princeton University Press.

McKinley, Kathryn L. 2001. Reading the Ovidian heroine : 'Metamorphoses' commentaries, 1100-1618. Leiden; Boston: Brill.

Percival, Florence. 1998. Chaucer's legendary good women. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Spentzou, Efrossini. 2003. Readers and writers in Ovid's Heroides : transgressions of genre and gender. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

White, Paul. 2009. Renaissance postscripts : responding to Ovid's Heroides in sixteenth-century France. Columbus: Ohio State University Press.

Contexts and theory

Cairns, Francis. 1972. Generic composition in Greek and Roman poetry. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

D’Ambra, Eve. 2007. Roman women. Cambridge Introduction to Roman Civilization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip065/2005036464.html.

Genette, Gérard. 1997. Palimpsests [electronic resource] : literature in the second degree. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Grafton, Anthony, Glenn W Most, and Salvatore Settis, eds. 2010. The classical tradition.

Harrison, S. J. 2007. Generic enrichment in Vergil and Horace. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

Hinds, Stephen. 1998. Allusion and intertext : dynamics of appropriation in Roman poetry. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Littlewood, C. A. J. 2004. Self-representation and illusion in Senecan tragedy . Oxford Classical Monographs. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Martindale, Charles. 1993. Redeeming the text : Latin poetry and the hermeneutics of reception. Cambridge University Press.

———. 2007. “Reception.” In A companion to the classical tradition, edited by Craig W. Kallendorf, 295–311. Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Powell, Anton, ed. 1990. Euripides, women, and sexuality. London: Routledge.

Sichi, Gérard. 2010. “Anouilh et son temps : les allusions à l’actualité.” Etudes litteraires 41 (1): 129. doi:10.7202/044575ar.

This list was last updated on 08/07/2016