Leeds University Library

MUSS5633M
Module Reading List

Electronic & Computer Music Contexts, 2017/18, Semester 1
Dr James Mooney
j.r.mooney@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Here are a few new readings for 2017/18. The first one - viewable online via the Library catalogue - is a useful guide for how to research and write about a topic of your choice: 

  • Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams. The craft of research ISBN: 9780226065663 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780226065656 (cloth : alk. paper); 0226065650 (cloth : alk. paper); 0226065669 (pbk. : alk. paper). 3rd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

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A couple of texts on ‘scripts’:

  • Akrich, Madeleine. ‘The De-Scription of Technical Objects’. In Shaping Technology/Building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change, edited by Wiebe E. Bijker and John Law, 205–24. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1992.
  • Tjora, Aksel H. ‘The Groove in the Box: A Technologically Mediated Inspiration in Electronic Dance Music’. Popular music. ISSN: 0261-1430 28, no. 02 (May 2009): 161. doi:10.1017/S0261143009001767.

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A seminal reader on sociology of technology (again, available electronically via the Library website):

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A collection of essays on material culture (i.e. objects) and electronic sound (this text listed here is the intro, which gives a summary of the chapters and main themes of the book):

  • Boon, Tim, and Frode Wieum. ‘Introduction’. In Material culture and electronic sound ISBN: 9781935623106 (cloth : alk. paper); 1935623109 (cloth : alk. paper), edited by Frode Weium and Tim Boon, xi–xvii. Washington, DC; Lanham, MD: Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press; Rowman & Littlefield, 2013.

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In addition, here are the texts per seminar. See module handbook for full details.

Week 1. Introductory Session (JM)

Please read the following two short texts:

  • Collins, Nick, and Julio d’Escrivan, eds. ‘Introduction’. In The Cambridge Companion to Electronic Music, 1–4. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
  • Collins, Nick, Margaret Schedel, and Scott Wilson. ‘Introduction’. In Electronic Music, 1–11. Cambridge Introductions to Music. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Week 2. Material culture, object biography, and Hugh Davies’s self-built musical instruments  (JM + DS)

Please read the following two texts:

  • Mooney, James. ‘The Hugh Davies Collection: Live Electronic Music and Self-Built Electro-Acoustic Musical Instruments, 1967-1975’. Science Museum Group Journal 7 (Spring 2017). doi:10.15180/170705.
  • Dawe, Kevin. ‘People, Objects, Meaning: Recent Work on the Study and Collection of Musical Instruments’. Galpin Society Journal 54 (May 2001): 219–232. doi:10.2307/842454.

Optional further reading

  • Williams, Sean. ‘Stockhausen Meets King Tubby’s: The Transformation of the Stepped Filter into a Musical Instrument’. In Material Culture and Electronic Sound, 159–83.

Week 3. Designers, users, scripts, and the Roland MC303 Groove Box (JM)

Please read the following two texts:

  • Tjora, Aksel H. ‘The Groove in the Box: A Technologically Mediated Inspiration in Electronic Dance Music’. Popular Music 28, no. 02 (May 2009): 161–177. doi:10.1017/S0261143009001767.
  • Akrich, Madeleine. ‘The De-Scription of Technical Objects’. In Shaping Technology/Building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change, edited by Wiebe E. Bijker and John Law, 205–24. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1992.

Week 4: Music Perception (FB)

Please read the following two texts:

  • Bailes, Freya & Dean, Roger T., ‘Empirical Studies of Computer Music,’ in The Oxford Handbook of Computer Music, ed. by Roger T. Dean (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp.473–492.
  • Bailes, Freya & Dean, Roger T., ‘Listener detection of segmentation in computer-generated sound: an exploratory experimental study’, Journal of New Music Research, 36(2), pp. 83-93, 2007.

Optional Further Reading

  • Windsor, Luke , ‘Through and around the acousmatic: the interpretation of electroacoustic sounds’ in Music, Electronic Media and Culture, ed. by Simon Emmerson (Ashgate Publishing Group: Abingdon, Oxon, 2000), pp. 7-35
  • Brattico, Elvira & Sassanelli, Fiorella, ‘Perception and musical preferences in Wishart's work’, Journal of New Music Research, 29(2), pp. 107-119, 2000.
  • Landy, Leigh ‘The Intention/Reception project’ in Analytical Methods of Electroacoustic Music, ed. by Mary Simoni (Routledge: New York, 2006), pp. 29-54.

Week 5. Sampling or plundering? (JM)

Please read the following two texts:

  • Cutler, Chris. ‘Plunderphonia’. In Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music, edited by Christoph Cox and Daniel Warner, Revised edition. New York: Bloomsbury, 2017.
  • Taylor, Timothy D. ‘A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery: Transnational Music Sampling and Enigma’s “Return to Innocence”’. In Music and Technoculture, edited by René T. A. Lysloff and Leslie C. Gay, 64–92. Middletown, Conn: Wesleyan University Press, 2003.

Week 6. Gender, class, race (JM)

Preparation

Please read the following two texts:

  • Vágnerová, Lucie. ‘“Nimble Fingers” in Electronic Music: Rethinking Sound through Neo-Colonial Labour’. Organised Sound 22, no. 02 (2017): 250–58. doi:10.1017/S1355771817000152.
  • Born, Georgina, and Kyle Devine. ‘Gender, Creativity and Education in Digital Musics and Sound Art’. Contemporary Music Review 35, no. 1 (2016): 1–20. doi:10.1080/07494467.2016.1177255.

Optional further reading

  • Morgan, Frances. ‘Pioneer Spirits: New Media Representations of Women in Electronic Music History’. Organised Sound 22, no. 02 (2017): 238–49. doi:10.1017/S1355771817000140.

Week 7. Pitch, rhythm and timbre in electronic dance music (JM)

Please read the following two texts:

  • Butler, Mark J. ‘Hearing Kaleidoscopes: Embedded Grouping Dissonance in Electronic Dance Music’. Twentieth-Century Music 2, no. 02 (2005): 221–43. doi:10.1017/S1478572206000272.
  • Kvifte, Tellef. ‘Musical Instruments and User Interfaces in Two Centuries’. In Material Culture and Electronic Sound, edited by Frode Weium and Tim Boon, 203–29. Washington, DC; Lanham, MD: Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press; Rowman & Littlefield, 2013.

Extra Texts and Listening

The following themes may provide the basis for further, time and interest permitting.

Issues of historiography in electronic music

  • Mooney, James, Dorien Schampaert, and Tim Boon. ‘Editorial: Alternative Histories of Electroacoustic Music’. Organised Sound 22, no. 02 (August 2017): 143–49. doi:10.1017/S135577181700005X.
  • Mooney, James. ‘Hugh Davies’s Electronic Music Documentation 1961–1968’. Organised Sound 20(1), April 2015, pp.111–121. doi:10.1017/S1355771814000521.

Social construction of technology (SCOT)

  • Pinch, Trevor, and Frank Trocco. ‘The Social Construction of the Early Electronic Music Synthesizer’. In Music and Technology in the Twentieth Century, edited by Hans-Joachim Braun, 67–83. Baltimore, MD.: John Hopkins University Press, 2002.
  • Pinch, Trevor J., and Wiebe E. Bijker. ‘The Social Construction of Facts and Artefacts: Or How the Sociology of Science and the Sociology of Technology Might Benefit Each Other’. Social Studies of Science 14, no. 3 (1 August 1984): 399–441. doi:10.2307/285355.

Technology and aesthetics

  • Mooney, James. ‘Technology, Process and Musical Personality in the Music of Stockhausen, Hugh Davies and Gentle Fire’. In The Musical Legacy of Karlheinz Stockhausen: Looking Back and Forward, edited by Morag J. Grant and Imke Misch, 102–15. Hofheim: Wolke, 2016.
  • Anderson, Virginia. ‘Comfy Cushions and Golden Grandiosi: Instruments of British Experimentalism’. The Galpin Society Journal 62 (2009): 273–86.

Liveness in electronic music

  • John Croft, 'Theses on Liveness', Organised Sound, 12/01 (April 2007), pp 59–66
  • Simon Emmerson, ‘The Reanimation of the World: Relocating the “Live”’, in Living Electronic Music (London: Ashgate, 2007) pp 35–60
  • Philip Auslander, 'Digital Liveness: A Historico-Philosophical Perspective’,  PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art, (PAJ 102), 34/3 (September 2012). http://0-muse.jhu.edu.wam.leeds.ac.uk/article/483962

Electroacoustic music

The following CDs provide an excellent overview of the history of electroacoustic music:

 

Performances of music by Hugh Davies and others

This list was last updated on 20/09/2017