Leeds University Library

HIST5880M
Module Reading List

Approaches to the History of Health and Medicine, 2017/18, Semester 1
Manuel Barcia Paz
m.barcia@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Week 1: Introduction to course and approaches to the history of health, medicine and society (Laura King)

These readings will provide a starting point for the course as a whole, covering the development of the field, different approaches and some overview texts of the history of health, medicine and society. As such, it is by no means exhaustive but provides a variety of ways into the subject.


Questions to consider:

- what are the key concepts used in the history of health, medicine and society?

- what have been the key developments in the history of health, medicine and society?

- in what ways does the history of health and medicine matter in the present?

Required readings:

For an introduction to key developments in the history of health and medicine, see:

Pickstone, J., ‘A brief history of medical history’: http://www.history.ac.uk/makinghistory/resources/articles/history_of_medicine.html

Waddington, K., An introduction to the social history of medicine : Europe since 1500 (Houndmills: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2011) – ‘Understanding the social history of medicine: Historiography’ and ‘Afterword’

On why the history of health and medicine matters, see:

Berridge, V., ‘History Matters? History’s role in health policy making’, Medical history. 52:3 (2008), pp.311-26

And also look at the History & Policy website and their short articles (http://www.historyandpolicy.org) - recent examples relating to the history of health and medicine include:

Julian M Simpson, ‘Diagnosing a flight from care: medical migration and ‘dirty work’ in the NHS’, 8 December 2014 - http://www.historyandpolicy.org/policy-papers/papers/diagnosing-a-flight-from-care-medical-migration-and-dirty-work-in-the-nhs

Jack Saunders, ‘When do doctors’ strikes end? A perspective from 1975’, 15 Feb 2016 - http://www.historyandpolicy.org/opinion-articles/articles/when-do-doctors-strikes-end-a-perspective-from-1975

Ali Haggett, ‘Men, mental illness and suicide: the current scene in historical context’, 12 June 2016 -

http://www.historyandpolicy.org/policy-papers/papers/men-mental-illness-and-suicide-the-current-scene-in-historical-context

Additional readings:

Berridge, V., ‘Hidden from History? Oral history and the history of health policy’, Oral History, 38:1 (2010), pp.91-100

Berridge, V., Gorsky, M., and Mold, A., Public health in history (OUP, 2011)

Bivins, R., and Pickstone, J., Medicine, madness and social history : essays in honour of Roy Porter (Basingstoke, 2007)

de Blecourt, W., and Usborne, C., (eds), Cultural approaches to the history of medicine : mediating medicine in early modern and modern Europe (London: Palgrave, 2004)

Brandt, A., ‘Emerging Themes in the History of Medicine’, Milbank quarterly., 69 (1991), pp.199-214

Bynum, W., and Porter, R., Companion encyclopedia of the history of medicine (vols 1 and 2, Routledge, 1993)

Cartwright, L., Screening the body : Tracing medicine's visual culture (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995)

Cooter, R., and Pickstone, J., (eds), Medicine in the twentieth century (London, 2003)

Cooter,  R., ‘After death/after-‘life’: the social history of medicine in post-postmodernity’, Social history of medicine. 20:3 (2007), pp.441–64

Cox, C., and Marland, H., (eds), Migration, health and ethnicity in the modern world (Houndmills: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2013)

Foucault, M., The Birth of the Clinic (London, 1963/2003)

Gijswijt-Hofstra, M., Marland, H., and de Waardt, H., (eds), Illness and healing alternatives in Western Europe (London and New York: Routledge, 1997)

Hayward, R., ‘”Much Exaggerated”: The End of the History of Medicine’, Journal of contemporary history. 40 (2005), pp.167-78

Huisman, F., and Warner, J.H., (eds), Locating medical history : the stories and their meanings (Baltimore, 2004)

Jackson, M., Health and the modern home (New York, Routledge, 2007)

Jackson, M., (ed.), The Oxford handbook of the history of medicine (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011)

Jackson, M., The Routledge history of disease (Routledge, 2015)

Jami, C, Moulin, A.M., and Petitjean, P., (eds), Science and empires : historical studies about scientific development and European expansion (London, 1992)

Jordanova, L., Nature displayed : gender, science, and medicine, 1760-1820: Essays (London, 1999)

Jordanova, L., ‘Has the Social History of Medicine Come of Age?’, The historical journal. 36 (1993), pp.437-49

Jordanova, L., ‘The Social Construction of Medical Knowledge’, Social history of medicine. 7:3 (1995), pp.361-81

Lane, J., A social history of medicine : health, healing and disease in England, 1750-1950 (London: Routledge, 2001)

Lawrence,C., Medicine in the making of modern Britain, 1700-1920 (London, 1997)

Nye, R., ‘The Evolution of the Concept of Medicalization in the Late Twentieth Century’, Journal of History of the Behavioral Sciences 39 (2003), pp.115-29 available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jhbs.10108/epdf

Palladino, P., ‘Medicine Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’, Social history of medicine. 14 (2001), pp.539-51

Pickstone, J., ‘Medical history as a way of life’, Social history of medicine., 18:2 (2005), 307–23

Pickstone, J., Ways of knowing : a new history of science, technology and medicine (Manchester, 2000)

Pickstone, J., ‘The development and present state of history of medicine in Britain’, Dynamis, 19 (1999), 457–86 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Porter, R., The greatest benefit to mankind : a medical history of humanity from antiquity to the present (London, 1999)

Rose, ‘N., Medicine, History and the Present’ in Colin Jones and Roy Porter (eds), Reassessing Foucault : power, medicine, and the body (London: Routledge, 1994)

Tansey, E. M. , and others, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine (Wellcome Trust Centre, London, various vols and years)

Waddington, K., An introduction to the social history of medicine : Europe since 1500 (Houndmills: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2011)

Wear, A., (ed.), Medicine in society : historical essays (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992)

Woods, R., ‘Medical and demographic history: inseparable?’, Social history of medicine., 20 (3) (2007), 483–503

Wright, P., and Treacher, A., (eds), The Problem of medical knowledge : examining the social construction of medicine (Edinburgh, 1982)

Week 2: Voices from Below (Iona McCleery)

Questions to consider:

- What is a 'patient'?

- How can we access the voices of the sick?

- What about the viewpoints of nursing and paramedical professionals, families and other carers?

- What are the problems with applying the concept of 'history from below' to the history of health/medicine and how can they be overcome? 

Required Readings:

Condrau, F., ‘The Patient’s View Meets the Clinical Gaze’, Social history of medicine. 20 (2007), 525-40              

Jewson, N., ‘The Disappearance of the Sick Man from Medical Cosmology, 1770-1870’, Sociology. 10 (1976), 225-44

Porter, R., ‘The Patient’s View: Doing Medical History from Below’, Theory and society. 14 (1985), 175-98 

Additional Readings:

Beier, L. M., Sufferers & healers : the experience of illness in seventeenth-century England (London, 1987)

Charon, R., Narrative medicine : honoring the stories of illness (New York, 2006)

Davis, K., ‘Silent and Censured Travellers’? Patients' Narratives and Patients' Voices: Perspectives on the History of mental Illness since 1948’, Social history of medicine. 14 (2001), 267-92

Digby, A. ,Making a medical living : doctors and patients in the English market for medicine, 1720-1911 (Cambridge, 1994) 

Fissell, M. E., Patients, power, and the poor in eighteenth-century Bristol (Cambridge, 1992) 

Foucault, M., The Birth of the Clinic: an Archaeology of Medical Perception, trans. A. M. Sheridan (London and New York, 2003)

Howell, J. D., Technology in the hospital : transforming patient care in the early twentieth century (Baltimore, 1995) 

Kleinman, A., The illness narratives : suffering, healing, and the human condition (New York: Basic Books, 1988)

Jenner, M. S. R., and Wallis, P. (eds), Medicine and the market in England and its colonies, c.1450-c.1850 (Basingstoke, 2007)

Jones, C., and Porter, R. (eds), Reassessing Foucault (London, 1994)

McVaugh, M. R., Medicine before the Plague: Practitioners and their Patients in the Crown of Aragon, 1285-1345 (Cambridge, 1993) 

Pelling, M., The common lot : sickness, medical occupations and the urban poor in early modern England (London, 1998)

Pomata, G., Contracting a cure : patients, healers, and the law in early modern Bologna (Baltimore, 1998)

Porter, R. (ed.), Patients and Practitioners: Lay Perceptions of Medicine in Pre-Industrial Society (Cambridge, 1985)

Rankin, A., ‘Duchess Heal Thyself: Elisabeth of Rochlitz and the Patient’s Perspective in Early-Modern Germany’, Bulletin of the history of medicine. 82 (2008), 109-44

Shorter, E., Bedside manners : the troubled history of doctors and patients (Harmondsworth, 1985)

Stolberg, M., Experiencing illness and the sick body in early modern Europe (Basingstoke, 2011)

Week 3: Material Culture (Mike Finn)

Questions to consider:

- How does Alberti apply the idea of ‘object biographies’ to help understand the history of museums in relation to the history of science, technology and medicine?

- What roles does Arnold suggest museums have, or should play, in documenting and presenting the history of medicine in particular?

- What suggestions does Pearce have for a historian trying to interpret an object? How do we apply these?

- What can historians of medicine and health learn from the study of objects and collections that can’t be learnt from textual sources? Can objects be a primary source of research for historians of medicine?


Required readings:

Alberti, S., ‘Objects and the Museum’, Isis., Vol. 96 (2005), pp.559-571

Arnold, K., ‘Museums and the making of medical history’, in R. Bud et al (eds), Manifesting medicine : bodies and machines (Amsterdam, 1999), pp.145-170 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Pearce, S.M., ‘Thinking about things’, in S.M. Pearce (ed.), Interpreting objects and collections (London, 1994)


Additional readings:

A few further readings - if you wish to look in detail at a particular aspect of this subject, please contact me for more suggestions.

For introductions to the history and collecting of medical and scientific objects, see:

Alberti, S., Morbid curiosities : medical museums in nineteenth-century Britain (Oxford, 2011)

Alberti, S., Nature and culture : objects, disciplines and the Manchester Museum (Manchester, 2009)

Ellis, R., ‘“Without decontextualisation”: the Stanley Royd Museum and the progressive history of mental health care’, History of Psychiatry Journal 26 (2015), pp.332-347

Hankins, T.L., & Silverman, R.J., Instruments and the imagination (Princeton, 1995)

Kavanagh, G., (ed.), Making histories in museums (London, 1999)

Pearce, S.M., (ed.), Interpreting objects and collections (London, 1994)

Soderqvist, T., ‘Between meaning culture and presence effects: contemporary biomedical objects as a challenge to museums’, Studies in history and philosophy of science. 40 (2009), pp.431-438

Taub, L., ‘On the role of museums in history of science, technology and medicine’, Endeavour. 22 (1998), pp.41-43

Taub, L., ‘On Scientific Instruments’, Studies in history and philosophy of science., Part A 40 (2009), pp.337-343

van Helden, A., & Hankins, T.L. (eds.), Osiris : a research journal devoted to the history of science and its cultural influences. Second series. 9 (1994) [This is a special issue of the journal examining “instruments”]

Veis, N., ‘The ethics of exhibiting psychiatric materials’, in C. Coleborne & D. MacKinnon (eds), Madness in Australia : histories, heritage and the asylum (St. Lucia, 2003), pp.49-61

On more theoretical and innovative approaches to material history, see:

Arnold, K., & Soderqvist, T., ‘Medical instruments in museums: immediate impressions and historical meanings’, Isis. 102 (2011), pp.718-729

Bud, R., et al (eds), Manifesting medicine : bodies and machines (Amsterdam, 1999), pp.145-170

Daston, L., (ed.), Biographies of scientific objects (Chicago, 2000)

Daston, L., (ed.), Things that talk : object lessons from art and science (New York, 2004)

Daston, L., & Galison, P., Objectivity (New York, 2004)

Knell, S.J., et al (eds.), Museum revolutions : how museums change and are changed (London, 2007)

McClung Fleming, E., ‘Artifact Study: A Proposed Model’, Winterthur Portfolio 9 (1971), pp.153-73

‘International Max Planck Research Network "History of Scientific Objects”’, available at: http://www.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/PDF/network.pdf


Week 4: Print Culture (Jon Topham)

Questions to consider:

- What is the history of books?  What is at stake in the different kinds of approach taken by Darnton and Adams and Barker?

- How does Secord consider that a book historical approach can transform the history of the ‘Darwinian Revolution’?  Do you think that he succeeds in transforming that history?

- How does Secord seek to use the changing conditions of the market for scientific and medical publications in early nineteenth-century Britain to explain the character of Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation?

- What aspects of book history does Secord emphasise in Victorian Sensation.  Are there aspects that he neglects?

- What kinds of criticisms have been levelled at Secord’s approach by other historians of science and medicine?

- What kinds of criticisms have been levelled at Secord’s approach by other historians of the book?

Required readings:

Howsam, L., Old books and new histories : an orientation to studies in book and print culture (Toronto: University of Toronto Pres, 2006), Ch. 3

Secord, J., Victorian sensation : the extraordinary publication, reception, and secret authorship of Vestiges of the natural history of creation (Chicago & London, 2000), prologue, Ch. 2, and epilogue (pp. 1–6, 41–76, and 515–32)

‘Roundtable: James Secord’s Victorian Sensation’, Journal of Victorian culture. 8 (2003), pp.119–50

Additional readings:

A further review symposium was devoted to Secord’s Victorian Sensation in the journal Metascience. See:

Taylor, M., Richards, E., and Johns, A., ‘Vestigial Sensations’, Metascience. 11 (2002), pp.4–27  

Secord, J., ‘Author’s Response’, Metascience. 11 (2002), pp.28–33

I edited a special section of the journal History of Science devoted to book history and the sciences in 2000, see:

Topham, J.R., ‘Introduction’, British journal for the history of science., 33 (2000), pp.155–58 

Johns, A., ‘Miscellaneous Methods: Authors, Societies and Journals in Early Modern England’, British journal for the history of science., 33 (2000), pp.159–86

Howsam, L., ‘An Experiment with Science for the Nineteenth- Century Book Trade: The International Scientific Series’, British journal for the history of science. History of Science, 33 (2000), pp.187–207 

Rupke, N., ‘Translation Studies in the History of Science: The Example of Vestiges’, British journal for the history of science., 33 (2000), pp.209–22.  

In 2002, the American History Review devoted a special forum to discussing the issue at stake between Elizabeth Eisenstein and Adrian Johns concerning the extent to which print brought hermeneutic stability in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe:

Grafton, A., ‘How Revolutionary Was the Print Revolution?’ The American historical review. 107 (2002), pp.84–86.

Eisenstein, E. L., ‘An Unacknowledged Revolution Revisited’, The American historical review. 107 (2002), pp.87–105  

Johns, A., ‘How to Acknowledge a Revolution’ The American historical review. 107 (2002), pp.106–25.  

The first special ‘Focus’ section of the leading history of science journal Isis in 2004 was devoted to the history of science and reading.  See:

Blair, A., ‘An Early Modernist’s Perspective’, Isis., 95 (2004), pp.420–30

Topham, J. R., ‘A View from the Industrial Age’, Isis., 95 (2004), pp.431–42 

Daston, L., ‘Taking Note(s)’ Isis., 95 (2004), pp.443–48 

Other useful/classic discussions/contributions include:

Cantor, G., Dawson, G., Gooday, G., Noakes, R., Shuttleworth, S., and Topham, J.R., Science in the nineteenth-century periodical : reading the magazine of nature (Cambridge, 2004)

Chartier, R., The Order of Books: Readers, Authors, and Libraries in Europe between the Fourteenth and Eighteenth Centuries (Cambridge, 1994)

Darnton, R., ‘What is the History of Books?’, Daedalus. 111 (1982), pp.65–83

Eisenstein, E., The Printing Press as an Agent of Change: Communications and Cultural Transformations in Early-Modern Europe (Cambridge, 1980)

Finkelstein, D., and McCleery, A., An introduction to book history (New York & Abingdon, 2005)

Finkelstein, D., and McCleery, A. (eds) The Book History Reader, 2nd ed. (Abingdon, 2006) 

Frasca-Spada, M., and Jardine, N. (eds), Books and the sciences in history (Cambridge, 2000)

Howsam, L., Old books and new histories : an orientation to studies in book and print culture (Toronto, 2006)

Johns, A., ‘History, Science and the History of the Book: the Making of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England’, Publishing history. 30 (1991), pp.5–30 .

Johns, A., The Nature of the Book: Print and Knowledge in the Making (Chicago & London, 1998)

Johns, A., ‘Science and the Book in Modern Cultural Historiography’,  Studies in history and philosophy of science. 29 (1998), pp.167–94.

Richardson, R., The making of Mr Gray's anatomy: Bodies, Books, Fortune, Fame (Oxford, 2008)

Secord, J., Victorian sensation : the extraordinary publication, reception, and secret authorship of Vestiges of the natural history of creation (Chicago & London, 2000)

Secord, J., ‘Science, Technology and Mathematics’, in ed. D. McKitterick, The Cambridge history of the book in Britain., Vol. 6, 1830-1914 (Cambridge, 2009), pp.443–74

Topham, J. R., 'Scientific Publishing and the Reading of Science in Nineteenth-Century Britain: A Historiographical Survey and Guide to Sources', Studies in history and philosophy of science. 31A (2000), pp.559–612

Topham, J. R., 'Beyond the "Common Context": The Production and Reading of the Bridgewater Treatises', Isis. 89 (1998), pp.233-62

Week 5: Workshop on archives, sources and assignment 1 (Laura King and Special Collections staff)

Preparation

There is no set reading for this week. Instead, we will be discussing the source analysis assignment and visiting the Special Collections in the Brotherton Library to learn more about some of the collections relating to health and medicine held on campus.

Please bring along a primary source material that interests you. It doesn’t have to be your final choice for your assignment, but will help us think through how you will construct and write up this piece of work. Please also think through which approaches and concepts (such as gender or material culture) you would use to help you analyse this source.

Further details about the session will be given in week 1 and via email.

Week 6: The body (Alex Bamji)

Questions to consider:

- To what extent, and in what ways, was the body understood differently in the past?

- What kinds of sources have been used by historians of the body and how have they used them?

- How has the history of the body been influenced by gender history?

Required readings:

Bynum, C. W., ‘Why all the fuss about the body? A medievalist’s perspective’, Critical inquiry. 22 (1995), pp.1-33.

Porter, R, ‘History of the Body Reconsidered’, in Peter Burke (ed.), New perspectives on historical writing (Cambridge, 2001), pp.233-260 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Rublack, U., ‘Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Female Body in Early Modern Germany’, Past & present. 150 (1996), pp.84-110

Additional readings:

Bynum, C. W., The Resurrection of the Body in Western Christianity, 200-1336 (New York, 1995)

Bynum, C. W., Holy Feast and Holy Fast (Oakland, CA,1987)

Canning, K., ‘The Body as Method? Reflections on the place of the body in gender history’, Gender & history. 11 (1999), pp.499-513

De Renzi, S., ‘Medical expertise, bodies, and the law in early modern courts’, Isis. 98 (2007), pp.315-322.

Duden, B., The woman beneath the skin : a doctor's patients in eighteenth-century Germany (Cambridge, MA, 1991)

Gallagher, C. and Laqueur , T.(eds), The making of the modern body : sexuality and society in the nineteenth century (Berkeley, 1987)

Harvey, K., ‘The substance of sexual difference: Change and persistence in representations of the body in eighteenth-century England’, Gender & history. 14 (2002), pp.202-223

Jenner, M. and Taithe, B.O., ‘The Historiographical Body’, in Roger Cooter and John Pickstone (eds), Medicine in the twentieth century (London and New York, 2003) Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Mol, A., The body multiple : ontology in medical practice (Durham, 2002)

Rublack, U., ‘Fluxes: The early modern body and the emotions’, History workshop journal. 53 (2002), pp.1-16

Stolberg, M., Experiencing illness and the sick body in early modern Europe (Basingstoke, 2011)

Turner, D., Disability in eighteenth-century England : imagining physical impairment (New York, 2012)

Week 7: Mind and brain (Mike Finn)

Questions to consider:

- What views does Foucault make of Tuke and Pinel? What does he mean in saying that they ‘borrowed from science only their disguise, or at most their justification’? What ideas of the history of psychiatry is he challenging?

- How does Scull’s view of Asylum Reform differ from Foucault? What relationship does he describe between asylums and the growth of psychiatry?

- What stages in the development of psychological medicine does Hayward identify? What role does he see the historian playing in the history of mind and brain?

- In what ways might medical practitioners and medical historians differ in their views of the history of madness, medicine and psychiatry?


Required readings:

Foucault, M., Madness & Civilization, trans. Richard Howard (London/New York, 2001) pp.229-264

Scull, A., The most solitary of afflictions : madness and society in Britain, 1700-1900 (London, 1993) pp.1-10; 26-45 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Hayward, R., ‘Medicine and the Mind’, in M. Jackson (ed.), The Oxford handbook of the history of medicine (Oxford, 2011) pp.524-542 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva


Additional readings:

A Few Further Readings (if you wish to look in detail at a particular aspect of this subject, please contact me for more suggestions).

Good overviews on the history of asylum psychiatry are:

Berrios, G.E., & Freeman, H., (eds), 150 years of British psychiatry, 1841-1991 (London, 1991)

Hervey, N., MacKenzie, C., & Scull, A., Masters of Bedlam : the transformation of the mad-doctoring trade (Princeton, 1996)

Melling, J., & Forsythe, B., (eds), Insanity, institutions, and society, 1800-1914 : a social history of madness in comparative perspective (London, 1999)

Oppenheim, J., "Shattered nerves" : doctors, patients, and depression in Victorian England (Oxford, 1991)

Porter, R., ‘Psychiatry’, in The greatest benefit to mankind : a medical history of humanity from antiquity to the present (London, 1997) pp. 493-524 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Shorter, E., A history of psychiatry : from the era of the asylum to the age of Prozac (New York, 1997).

Showalter, E., The female malady : women, madness and English culture 1830-1980 (New York, 1987)

Scull, A.T., The most solitary of afflictions : madness and society in Britain, 1700-1900: (New Haven & London, 1993) pp.1-45

On the historiography of psychiatry, including coverage of debates in the last 50 years, see:

Bartlett, P., & Wright, D., (eds), Outside the walls of the asylum : the history of care in the community, 1750-2000 (Linton, 1999) pp.1-18

Crammer, J.L., ‘English asylums and English doctors: where Scull is wrong’, History of Psychiatry 5 (1994), pp.103-115

Porter, R., ‘History of psychiatry in Britain’, History of Psychiatry 2 (1991), pp.271-279

Porter, R., & Micale, M.S., ‘Introduction: Reflections on Psychiatry and Its Histories’, in M.S. Micale & R. Porter (eds), Discovering the history of psychiatry (New York & Oxford, 1994), pp.3-36 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Scull, A.T., ‘Michel Foucault’s history of madness’, History of the human sciences. 3:1 (Feb., 1990), pp.57-67

Scull, A., ‘Psychiatry and its historians’, History of Psychiatry 2 (1991), pp.239-250

Szasz, T., ‘The Myth of Mental Illness’, The American psychologist. 15 (1960), pp.113-118 [Available at: http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Szasz/myth.htm]

On the neurology and the mind-brain issue in the nineteenth-century:

Clark, M.J., ‘‘Morbid Introspection’, unsoundness of mind, and British psychological medicine, c.1830-c.1900’, in W.F. Bynum, R. Porter & M. Shepherd (eds.), The anatomy of madness : essays in the history of psychiatry. Vol.3, The asylum and its psychiatry (London/New York, 1988), pp.71-101 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Danziger, K., ‘Mid-Nineteenth Century British Psycho-Physiology: A Neglected Chapter in the History of Psychology’, in W.R. Woodward & M.G. Ash, The problematic science : psychology in nineteenth-century thought (New York, 1982), pp.119-146.

Gilman, S.L., ‘Mind and body in the history of psychiatry’, History of Psychiatry 17 (2006), pp.5-7

Harrington, A., Medicine, mind, and the double brain : a study in nineteenth century thought (Princeton, 1987)

Jacyna, L.S., ‘Somatic Theories of Mind and the Interests of Medicine in Britain, 1850-1879’, Medical history. 26 (1982), pp.233-258

Young, R.M., ‘The Functions of the Brain: Gall to Ferrier (1808 – 1886)’, Isis. 59 (1968) pp.250-268



Week 8: Race and ethnicity (Greg Radick)

Questions to consider:

- How did Charles Darwin explain the origin and diversity of the human races, and what evidence did he draw upon in supporting this explanation?

- In what ways, if any, are Darwin’s scientific views on race and evolution related to his family’s antislavery politics?

- What is meant by “social Darwinism” and “eugenics”, and how have these programmes (or whatever they are) interacted with ideas about race?

- In what ways can sensitivity to the above usefully inform approaches to understanding health, medicine and society historically?

Required readings:

Darwin, C., Descent of man and selection in relation to sex. 2 vols (London: John Murray, 1871) – read ch. 7, “The Races of Man,” pp. 214-50, vol. 1, and the concluding summary in ch. 20, “Secondary Sexual Characters in Man (cont.)”, pp. 382-4, vol. 2 [available at the Darwin Online website http://darwin-online.org.uk/]

Radick, G., ‘How and Why Darwin Got Emotional about Race: An Essay in Historical and Deep-Historical Reconstruction’, in Efram Sera-Shriar (ed.), The Search for Human Origins: Deep Time, Evolution, and Race in Nineteenth-Century British Sciences (Pittsburgh, forthcoming) [to be circulated]

Paul, D., ‘Darwin, social Darwinism and eugenics’, in Jonathan Hodge and Gregory Radick (eds), The Cambridge Companion to Darwin, 2nd edition (Cambridge, 2009), ch. 9, pp.219-45


Additional readings:

Short background articles:

Richards, R.J., ‘Race’, in John Heilbron (ed.), The Oxford Companion to the History of Modern Science (Oxford, 2003), pp.697-98

Radick, G., ‘Darwin and Humans’, in Michael Ruse (ed.), The Cambridge encyclopedia of Darwin and evolutionary thought (Cambridge, 2013), pp.173-181

James, M., ‘Race’, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/race/

Longer works:

Desmond, A., and Moore, J., Darwin's sacred cause : race, slavery and the quest for human origins Origins (London, 2009)

Gould, S.J., The Mismeasure of Man (London, 1981, but seek out of the revised and expanded 1996 edition)

Wailoo, K., Dying in the city of the blues : sickle cell anemia and the politics of race and health (Durham NC, 2001)

Williams, G., and Nesse, R., ‘The dawn of Darwinian medicine’, Quarterly review of biology. 66:1 (1991), pp.1-22


Week 9: Gender (Jessica Meyer)

Questions to consider:

- How does gender shape historical understandings of particular forms of illness and disability?

- What is the impact of gender on patient experience?

- What is the relationship between gender and the development of medicine as a profession?


Required readings:

Marland, H., ‘Women, Health and Medicine’ in The Oxford handbook of the history of medicine, edited by Mark Jackson (Oxford, 2011), pp.484-502 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva .

To be read together

Donner, H. ‘Under the Cross: Why V.A.D.s performed the filthiest task in the dirtiest war: Red Cross Women Volunteers, 1914-1918’, Journal of Social history. 30 (1997), pp.687-704

Watson, J. ‘War on the Wards: The social construction of medical work in First World War Britain’, The journal of British studies. 41 (2002), pp.484-510


Additional readings:

Anderson, J. War, War, disability and rehabilitation in Britain : "soul of a nation" (Manchester, 2011), chapters 5 and 6

Andrews, J. and Digby, A. (eds.) Sex and seclusion, class and custody : perspectives on gender and class in the history of British and Irish psychiatry (Amsterdam, 2004)

Appignanesi, L. Mad, bad and sad : a history of women and the mind doctors from 1800 to the present (London, 2008).

Bivins, R. and Pickstone, J.V. (eds.) Medicine, madness and social history : essays in honour of Roy Porter (Basingstoke, 2007)

Bourke, J. Dismembering the male : men's bodies, Britain and the Great War (London, 1996)

Bourke, J., ‘Love and Limblessness: Male Heterosexuality, Disability, and the Great War’, Journal of war and culture studies. (2015), pp.1-17.

Carden-Coyne, A. (ed.) Gender and conflict since 1914 : historical and interdisciplinary perspectives (Basingstoke, 2012), chapters 6 and 8 .

Churchill, W. D. Female patients in early modern Britain : gender, diagnosis, and treatment (Farnham, 2012)

Cooter, R. and Pickstone, J. (eds.) Companion to medicine in the twentieth century (London, 2000), particularly chapters on the body and practice.

Digby, A. Making a medical living : doctors and patients in the English market for medicine, 1720-1911 (Cambridge, 1994), chapter 9 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Digby, A. and Stewart, J. (eds), Gender, health and welfare (Oxford, 1996), chapters 3, 6 and 8

Fell, A.S. and Hallett, C.E. (eds), First World War nursing : new perspectives (Oxford, 2013)

Gagen, W. ‘Remastering the Body, Renegotiating Gender: Physical Disability and Masculinity during the First World War, the Case of J. B. Middlebrook’, European review of history = Revue européenne d'histoire. 14 (2007), pp.525-541

Heggie, V., ‘Women Doctors and Lady Nurses: Class, Education, and the Professional Victorian Woman’, Bulletin of the history of medicine. 89 (2015), pp.267-92

Jordanova, L., Sexual Visions: Images of gender in science and medicine between the eighteenth and twentieth Centuries (Wisconsin, 1989)

Loudon, I., Death in childbirth : an international study of maternal care and maternal mortality, 1800-1950 (Oxford, 1992)

Lupton, D., Medicine as culture : illness, disease and the body in western societies (London, 1994)

Marland, H., ‘Disappointment and Desolation: Women, Doctors and Interpretations of Puerperal Insanity in the Nineteenth Century’, History of Psychiatry 14 (2003), pp.303-20

Micale, M.S., Approaching hysteria : disease and its interpretations (Princeton, 1995)

Parry, J. and Parry, N., The rise of the medical profession : a study of collective social mobility (London, 1976)

Reader, W. J., Professional men : the rise of the professional classes in nineteenth-century England (Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1966)

Showalter, E., The female malady : women, madness and English culture 1830-1980 (London, 1987)

Waddington, K., An introduction to the social history of medicine : Europe since 1500 (Basingstoke, 2011), chapter 4 .

Watson, J. ‘War on the Wards: The social construction of medical work in First World War Britain’, The journal of British studies. 41 (2002), pp.484-510

Wilson, A., The making of man-midwifery : childbirth in England 1660-1770 (London, 1995)

Vertinsky, P., The eternally wounded woman: women, doctors and exercise in the late nineteenth century (Manchester, 1990)

Zweiniger-Bargielowska, I., Managing the body : beauty, health, and fitness in Britain, 1880-1939 (Oxford, 2010)

Zweiniger-Bargielowska, I. (ed.), Women in twentieth-century Britain: Social, Cultural and Political Change (London, 2001), chapters 6 and 7

Week 10: Ageing (Jamie Stark)

Questions to consider:

- Is there such a thing as ‘old age’? What does Ottaway say about the role of medical knowledge in answering this question?

- How has ageing been defined historically? How does Lorand define old ageing and ageing?

- What are the parallels between Lorand’s ideas and our contemporary perceptions of ageing?

- What are the respective roles of medicine, science and society in determining the key features of ageing? How do Ottaway and Johnson differ on this?

- What can we learn from histories of age and ageing? Are they different from studies which highlight class, gender and race? If so, how? If not, why?

Required readings:

Ottaway, S., ‘Medicine and Old Age’ in Mark Jackson (ed.), The Oxford handbook of the history of medicine (Oxford, 2013) pp.338-354 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Lorand, A., Old age deferred : the causes of old age and its postponement by hygienic and therapeutic measures (Philadelphia, 1913) Chapters 1 and 2, pp.1-20

Johnson, P., ‘Historical Readings of Old Age and Ageing’ in Paul Johnson and Pat Thane (eds), Old Age from Antiquity to Post-Modernity (London, 1998) pp.1-18. Available via Google Books: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Tc6EAgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

Additional readings:

Botelho, L.A., and Thane, P. (eds), Women and ageing in British society since 1500 (Harlow, 2001)

Gilleard , C., and Higgs, P., Contexts of ageing : class, cohort, and community (Cambridge, 2005)

Harrison, R., Juvenescence : a cultural history of our age (Chicago, London, 2014)

Minois, G., History of old age : from antiquity to the Renaissance (London, 1989)

Ottaway, S., The decline of life : old age in eighteenth-century England (Cambridge, 2004)

de la Peña, C., The body electric [electronic resource] : how strange machines built the modern American (New York, 2003)

Segal, L., Out of time : the pleasures and perils of ageing (London, New York:, 2013)

Thane, P., Old age in English history : past experiences, present issues (Oxford, 2000)

Thane, P., The long history of old age (London, 2005)

Wook Park, H., Old age, new science : gerontologists and their biosocial visions, 1900-1960 (Pittsburgh, 2016)

Week 11: Demography (Shane Doyle)

Questions to consider:

- Have populations grown more because of improved reproductive health or reduced mortality?

- Why has population growth in Africa not mimicked the patterns of change seen in the developed world?

- Why is the debate around the role of preventive vs curative medicine in reducing global mortality so controversial?

Required readings:

Bashford, A., Global population : history, geopolitics, and life on earth (New York, 2014), introduction

Harrison, M., Disease and the modern world : 1500 to the present day (Cambridge, 2004), introduction

Stepan, N.L., Eradication : ridding the world of diseases forever?. Ridding the World of Diseases Forever? (Ithaca, NY, 2011), chs.1, 7 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva .

Additional readings:

I) DEMOGRAPHIC AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL TRANSITION THEORY

Connelly, Matthew ‘Population Control is History: New Perspectives on the International Campaign to Limit Population Growth’, Comparative studies in society and history. 45 (2003), pp.122-47

Davis, K., ‘The population specter: rapidly declining death rate in densely populated countries. The amazing decline of mortality in underdeveloped areas’ American economic review., Papers and Proceedings 46,2 (1956), Supplement, pp.305-16.

Dyson, T., Population and development: the demographic transition/ Tim Dyson. (2010), ch.1

Greenhalgh, S., ‘The social construction of population science: an intellectual, institutional and political history’ Comparative studies in society and history. 1996, pp.26-66

Notestein, F.W., 'Population- the long view' in T.W. Schultz (ed) Food for the world (Chicago 1945), pp.36-57

Szreter, S.R.S., 'The idea of demographic transition: a critical intellectual history' Population and development review.. 19,4 (1993), pp.659-701

II) RISING FERTILITY IN BRITAIN AND AFRICA: IMPROVED REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH VS SOCIO-ECONOMIC CHANGE

Bongaarts, J., Odile, F., and Lesthaeghe, R., ‘The proximate determinants of fertility in sub-Saharan Africa. Population and development review. Review 10(3) (1984), pp.511-537

Caldwell, J.C. and Caldwell., P., ‘ The cultural context of high fertility in subSaharan Africa. Population and development review. 20(1) (1987), pp.179-187

Doyle, S., Before HIV : sexuality, fertility and mortality in East Africa, 1900-1980 (Oxford, 2013), pp.221-278 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Hudson, P., and King, S., ‘Two textile townships 1660-1820: a comparative demographic analysis’ The economic history review. 4 (2000), pp.706-41

Kitching, G., ‘Proto-Industrialization and Demographic Change: A Thesis and Some Possible African Implications The journal of African history. 24,2 (1983), pp.221-240.

Koponen, J., ‘ Population growth in historical perspective: the key role of changing fertility’, in Jannik Boesen, Kjell J. Havnevik, Juhani Koponen Rie Odgaard (eds.) Tanzania : crisis and struggle for survival (Uppsala, 1986)

Romaniuk, A. ‘Increase in natural fertility during the early stages of modernization: evidence from an African case study, Zaire’. Population studies. 34(2) (1980), pp.293-310

Schofield, R.S., ‘Family structure, demographic behaviour and economic growth’ in J. Walter and R. Schofield (eds) Famine, disease and the social order in early modern society (Cambridge, 1991)

Wrigley, E.A., ‘British population during the ‘long’ eighteenth century, 1680-1840’ in Floud and Johnson (eds), The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain (CEHMB, 2004) (3rd Edn)

III) DECLINING MORTALITY IN BRITAIN AND AFRICA: EPIDEMICS VS ENDEMICS, PREVENTIVE VS CURATIVE; PUBLIC VS MARKET

Epidemics

Dobson, M., Contours of death and disease in early modern England (Cambridge, 1997), ch.8 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva .

Dobson, M., ‘The last hiccup of the old demographic regime’ Continuity and Change 4,3 (1989), pp.395-428.

Doyle, S., ‘Population decline and delayed recovery in Bunyoro, 1860- 1960’ The journal of African history. 41 (2000), pp.429-458

Feachem, R.T., and Jamison, D.T., Disease and Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa (Oxford, 1991)

Hardy, A., ‘Cholera, quarantine and the English preventive system’ Medical history. 37 (1993), pp.250-69.

Harrison, M., Disease and the modern world : 1500 to the present day (Cambridge, 2004). Chs.3-5.

Landers, J., Death and the metropolis : studies in the demographic history of London 1670-1830 (Cambridge, 1993), chs. 1, 4 .

McNeill, W.H., Plagues and Peoples (Harmondsworth, 1976), Intro

Porter, D., and Porter, R., ‘The politics of prevention: anti-vaccinationism and Public Health in Nineteenth-Century England’, Medical history. (1988), pp.231-52.

Riley, J.C., Rising life expectancy : a global history (Cambridge 2001), Intro Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva .

Timaeus, I.M., ‘Adult mortality’ in Karen A. Foote, Kenneth H. Hill and Linda G. Martin (eds.) Panel on the population dynamics of demographic change In sub-saharan africa (Washington D.C, 1993)

Wrigley, E.A., ‘British population during the ‘long’ eighteenth century, 1680-1840’ in Floud and Johnson, The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain (CEHMB, 2004) (3rd Edn)

Endemics

Blacker, J.G.C., ‘Infant and Child Mortality: Development, Environment, and Custom’, in Feachem, R.T. and Jamison, D.T., Disease and Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa (Oxford, 1991) 

Hakansson, T., ‘Pagan practices and the death of children: German missionaries and child health in South Pare, Tanzania’, World development. 26(8) (1991)

Harris, B., ‘Public health, nutrition and the decline of mortality: the McKeown thesis revisited’,Social history of medicine.17 (2004), pp.379-407.

McKeown, T., The modern rise of population (London, 1976), esp. chs.1,3,5-7, 9.

Scrimshaw, N., ‘Historical Concepts of Interactions, synergism and antagonism between nutrition and infection’ Journal of Nutrition. 133 (2003), pp.316S-321S.

Szreter, S., and Mooney, G., ‘Urbanisation, Mortality and the standard of living debate’, The economic history review.  51,1 (1998), pp.84-112

Woods, R., The demography of Victorian England and Wales (Cambridge, 2000), chs.7-9.

THE NEO-LIBERAL WASHINGTON CONSENSUS AND ALTERNATIVE THEORIES OF POPULATION HEALTH

Arora, S., ‘Health, human productivity and long-term economic growth’ The journal of economic history. 61 (2001), pp.699-749s

Bauer, P.T., ‘Population Growth: Disaster or Blessing?’ Independent Review 3 (1998), pp.67-76.

Easterlin, R.A., ‘How beneficient is the market? A look at the modern history of mortality’, European Review of European review of economic history 3 (1999), pp.257-94

Pritchett , L., and Summers, L.H., ‘Wealthier is healthier’, Journal of human resources. 31 (1996), pp.841-868.

This list was last updated on 21/09/2016