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LUBS1270
Module Reading List

Statistics for Economics and Business 1, 2018/19, Semester 2
Dr Gaston Yalonetzky
g.yalonetzky@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

(a) Key Textbook Readings

The module does not rely on one single textbook. There are several recent ones which are recommendable. One of them is:

McClave, J. T., Benson, P. G., and Sincich, T., (2008) Statistics for Business and Economics, 10th edition, Pearson International Edition.   

Traditionally the module has relied on the following cut-down version of the above textbook:

Mathematics and statistics for business and economics. 1, Statistics component, compiled by Dr. Kausik Chaudhuri.

Note that the production and sale of this customized textbook has been discontinued. However, there are copies of both the textbook and its cut-down version book available in the library.

There is also another very recent book which I strongly recommend for those of you who like science-fiction and/or may be interested in a story-telling textbook that guides you through the material with a novel-style story:

Field, A. (2016) An adventure in statistics : the reality enigma, Sage. 

Additionally, there are plenty other similar textbooks in the Library. Too many to be listed here. When you look for them try to use keyboards like “Statistics for Business and Economics”, or related variations. You are most welcome (and encouraged) to browse them and use them for complementary explanations and as a large source of exercises for your practice and revision. Recently a couple of very good textbooks have been published. Here’s a list of examples which I found useful:

Cortinhas, C. And Black, K. (2012) Statistics for business and economics, First European Edition, Wiley.

Landers, R. (2013), A step by step introduction to statistics for business, Sage. (This one looks very friendly and accessible).

Moore, D. G. McCabe, L. Alwan, B. Craig and W. Duckworth (2011) The practice of statistics for business and economics, Palgrave.

Barrow, M. (2013) Statistics for economics, accounting and business studies, sixth edition, Pearson.  

Keller, G. and N. Gaciu (2015) Managerial statistics ISBN: 9781473704800 (pbk.) : £55.99, Cengage Learning.

*WARNING*: Most of the textbooks cited above have material for this course but also for more advanced courses (which is actually very good if you plan to use them for more than one module, or even buying one of them). When you use them, make sure that you are using the content (including exercises) that is right for the level of the course.

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(b) Complementary resources

There are also online resources that can be useful both for revision of theory and exercises. The following are a few examples that you may want to use:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology:

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/economics/14-30-introduction-to-statistical-methods-in-economics-spring-2009/

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/economics/14-30-introduction-to-statistical-method-in-economics-spring-2006/

University of Michigan:

https://web.archive.org/web/20121113211659/http://open.umich.edu/education/lsa/statistics250/fall2012

Carnegie Mellon:

http://oli.cmu.edu/courses/free-open/statistics-course-details/

http://oli.cmu.edu/courses/free-open/statistical-reasoning-course-details/

OER commons:

http://www.oercommons.org/courses/statistical-reasoning-i/view

http://www.oercommons.org/courses/statistics-for-laboratory-scientists-i

WARNING: Some of the online material listed above may be too advanced for the level of the module. The most reliable material in terms of level adequacy is the MIT’s. Hence I would recommend it above the other online options.

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(c) Motivational reading:

The following books are worth reading for those already interested in statistics, and also for those who would like to draw some motivation from statistics’ multifaceted connections to real life (starred items are highly recommended).

*Wheelan, Charles (2013) Naked statistics : stripping the dread from the data, Norton.

*Schwabish, Jonathan (2014) “An economist’s guide to visualizing data”, The journal of economic perspectives., 28(1): 209-34.

*Rowntree, Derek (2000) “ Statistics without tears : an introduction for non-mathematicians ”, Penguin.

*Huff, Darrell (1991) “ How to lie with statistics ”, Penguin.

*Bram, Uri (2012) Thinking statistically, Createspace.

Silver, Nate (2013) The signal and the noise : the art and science of prediction, Penguin.

Taleb, Nassim (2007) Fooled by randomness : the hidden role of chance in life and in the markets, Penguin.

Taleb, Nassim (2008) The black swan: The impact of the highly improbable, Penguin.

Blastland, Michael and Andrew Dilnot (2008) The tiger that isn’t: Seeing through a world of numbers, Profile Books.

Blastland, Michael and David Spiegelhalter (1996) The Norm chronicles : stories and numbers about danger, Profile Books.

This list was last updated on 13/12/2018