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HIST1300
Module Reading List for Hist 1300

Primary Sources for the Historian: An Introduction to Documentary study, 2019/20, Semester 2
Professor Stephen Alford
S.Alford@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Background Reading

Adam, Barry D,  The Rise of a Gay and Lesbian Movement  , Revised (New York, NY: Twayne Publishers, 1995)

Armstrong, Elizabeth A.,  Forging Gay Identities: Organizing Sexuality in San Francisco, 1950-1994  (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2002)

Armstrong, Elizabeth A., and Suzanna M. Crage, ‘Movements and Memory: The Making of the Stonewall Myth’,  American Sociological Review  , 71 (2006), 724–751

Bernstein, Mary, ‘Celebration and Suppression: The Strategic Uses of Identity by the Lesbian and Gay Movement’,  American Journal of Sociology  , 103 (1997), 531–565

----------------, ‘Identities and Politics: Toward a Historical Understanding of the Lesbian and Gay Movement’,  Social Science History  , 26 (2002), 531-581

Blasius, Mark, and Shane Phelan,  We Are Everywhere: A Historical Sourcebook of Gay and Lesbian Politics  (New York, NY: Routledge, 1997)

 D’Emilio, John, ‘  Making and Unmaking Minorities: The Tensions Between Gay Politics and History  ’,  New York University Review of Law & Social Change  , 14 (1986), 915–22

---------------,  Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities: The Making of a Homosexual Minority in the United States, 1940-1970  (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1983), pp. 1-57 (Chapters 1, 2 & 3)

-------------,  The World Turned:  Essays on Gay History, Politics, and Culture  (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2002)

Escoffier, Jeffrey,  American Homo: Community and Perversity  (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998). Avavailabel online at: http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/view? docId=ft0q2n99kf&chunk.id=d0e655&toc.depth=1&toc.id=d0e655&brand=ucpress

 Elshtain, Jean Bethke, ‘Homosexual Politics: The Paradox of Gay Liberation’,  Salmagundi , 1982, 252–280

Herman, Ellen, ‘Good Gays and Bad: The Respectability Question in Gay and Lesbian History’,  Radical History Review , 56 (1993), 144–48  (  Available as an Online Course Reading in the VLE  )

Marcus, Eric, ed.,  Making Gay History: The Half-Century Fight for Lesbian and Gay Equal Rights  (New York: Perennial, 2002)

Stein, Marc, ‘ Theoretical Politics, Local Communities: The Making of U.S. LGBT Historiography ’,  GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies , 11 (2005), 605– 625

Wald, Kenneth D., ‘The Context of Gay Rights’, in  The Politics of Gay Rights , ed. by Craig A Rimmerman, Kenneth D. Wald and Clyde Wilcox (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000), pp. 1–28 

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Seminar Two: Homophile Politics and 1950s/60s American Culture

Seminar Two Reading

*D’Emilio, John,  Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities: The Making of a Homosexual Minority in the United States, 1940-1970  (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983), pp. 40-91 

*Loftin, Craig M, ed., Letters to One : gay and lesbian voices from the 1950s and 1960s (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2012), pp. 1-12 (Preview available in Google Books)

Stein, Marc, ‘ Theoretical Politics, Local Communities: The Making of U.S. LGBT Historiography ’,  GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies , 11 (2005), 605– 625

Seminar Two Topics

1. How representative are these letters of what life for the American LGBT community was like?

2. How did lesbians and gay men organise to further the cause of gay rights?

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Seminar Three: Gay Identity

Seminar Three Reading

*D'Emilio, John,  The World Turned:  Essays on Gay History, Politics, and Culture  (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2002), pp. 154-164

*Loftin, Craig M, ed.,  Letters to One : gay and lesbian voices from the 1950s and 1960s  (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2012), pp. 13-64

*Stein, Marc, Rethinking the Gay and Lesbian Movement (New York: Routledge, 2012), pp. 5-12

Seminar Three Topics

1. How did gay people see themselves?  What did being gay mean in this period?

2. Was this vision universal?

3. Where did this identity come from?  

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Seminar Four: Sexuality, Love, and Gender Roles

Seminar Four Reading

*Davis, Madeline, and Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy, ‘Oral History and the Study of Sexuality in the Lesbian Community: Buffalo, New York, 1940-1960’,  Feminist Studies  , 12 (1986), 7–26 

*Faderman, Lillian,  Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth Century America  (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1991), pp. 159-88

Kennedy, Elizabeth Lapovsky, ‘Telling Tales: Oral History and the Construction of Pre-Stonewall Lesbian History’,  Radical History Review , 1995 (1995), 59–79 

Kennedy, Elizabeth Lapovsky, and Madeline D Davis,  Boots of Leather, Slippers of Gold: The History of a Lesbian Community  (New York: Penguin Books, 1994)

Laporte, Rita, ‘The Butch/Femme Question, from The Ladder (1971)’, in We are everywhere : a historical sourcebook of gay and lesbian politics , ed. by Mark Blasius and Shane Phelan (New York: Routledge, 1997), pp. 355–364 (Available Via Google Books Preview

*Loftin, Craig M, ed.,  Letters to One : gay and lesbian voices from the 1950s and 1960s  (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2012), pp. 83-103

*---------, ‘Unacceptable Mannerisms: Gender Anxieties, Homosexual Activism, and Swish in the United States, 1945-1965’,  Journal of Social History  , 40 (2007), 577–596 

Seminar Four Topics

1. What do we mean by the terms butch, femme, and swish?

2. How is gender constructed?

3. Why did gender roles play an important role in gay life? Were they oppressive?

4. Why were people marginalised for transgressing gender boundaries?

5. Was gay liberation’s rejection of gender roles itself repressive?  

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Seminar Five: Homophile Activism

Seminar Five Reading

*D’Emilio, John,  Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities: The Making of a Homosexual Minority in the United States, 1940-1970  (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983), pp. 149-176 and 196-223

*Esterberg, Kristin Gay, ‘From Accommodation to Liberation: A Social Movement Analysis of Lesbians in the Homophile Movement’, Gender & society , 8 (1994), 424–443

Faderman, Lillian,  Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth Century America  (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1991)

Gallo, Marcia M.,  Different Daughters: A History of the Daughters of Bilitis and the Rise of the Lesbian Rights Movement  (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2006)  

*Herman, Ellen ‘Good Gays and Bad: The Respectability Question in Gay and Lesbian History’, Radical History Review , 56 (1993), 144-48 (Copies to be emailed after Seminar Four).

*Meeker, Martin, ‘Behind the Mask of Respectability: Reconsidering the Mattachine Society and Male Homophile Practice, 1950s and 1960s’,  Journal of the History of Sexuality  , 10 (2001), 78–116

Seminar Five Topics

1. How has homophile activism traditionally been portrayed?  Was the change of leadership in 1953 a “retreat to respectability”?

2. What purpose did Homophiles ascribe to the Movement?  Did this differ?  

3. Was later activism radical or respectable?  Could it be both?

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Seminar Six: Repression and Defiance

Seminar Six Reading

*Agee, Christopher, ‘Gayola: Police Professionalization and the Politics of San Francisco’s Gay Bars, 1950-1968’, Journal of the History of Sexuality , 15 (2006), 462–489

*D’Emilio, John, ‘The Homosexual Menace: The Politics of Sexuality in Cold War America’, in Passion and Power: Sexuality in History , ed. by Kathy Peiss, Christina Simmons, and Robert A. Padgug (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1989), pp. 226–240 (available via VLE) 

*Jennings , Dale, ‘To Be Accused Is to Be Guilty from  ONE Magazine  (1953)’, in  We are everywhere : a historical sourcebook of gay and lesbian politics , ed. by Mark Blasius and Shane Phelan (New York: Routledge, 1997), pp. 310–312 ( Available via Google Books Preview )

Johnson, David K., ‘“Homosexual Citizens”: Washington’s Gay Community Confronts the Civil Service’, Washington History , 6 (1994), 44–63

*Loftin, Craig M, ed.,  Letters to One: Gay and Lesbian Voices from the 1950s and 1960s  (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2012), pp. 103-49 

 Seminar Six Topics

1. How did the letter writers see the cause of gay rights?

2. Why did mainstream society feel the need to repress the LGBT community and what form did this repression take?

3. What were homophile organisations doing to improve life for gay men and lesbians?  

4. How did Lesbian oppression differ from that of gay male oppression? Did their priorities differ and why?

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Seminar Seven: The Sickness Theory

Seminar Seven Reading

*Bieber, Irving, ‘Speaking Frankly: Taboo’, The New York times. , 23 August 1964, Sunday Magazine, pp. 75, 107–8

*Conrad, Florence, ‘Research Is Here to Stay’, The Ladder , August 1965, pp. 15–21 (Copies will be emailed out after Seminar Six)

*Esterberg, Kristin G., ‘From Illness to Action: Conceptions of Homosexuality in the Ladder, 1956-1965’,  The Journal of Sex Research  , 27 (1990), 65–80

*Elver, Barker, Is Homosexuality a Disease? , 19 December 1967, Box 1, Folder 1, Mattachine Society, Inc. of New York Records, Manuscripts and Archives Division, The New York Public Library (Copies will be emailed out after Seminar Six)

*Kameny, Franklin E., ‘Does Research into Homosexuality Matter, from The Ladder (May 1965)’, in We are everywhere : a historical sourcebook of gay and lesbian politics , ed. by Mark Blasius and Shane Phelan (New York: Routledge, 1997), pp. 335–339  ( Available Via Google Books Preview  - Email me for the original article if you cannot access it via google books)

Seminar Seven Topics

1. Why did people think gay men and lesbians were Ill?

2. What were the consequences of this for the gay rights movement?  

3. How did gay men and lesbians attempt to challenge the sickness theory?

4. Can this challenge be considered radical?

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Seminar Eight: Homosexuality, Incarceration, and the Law

Seminar Eight Reading

*Konnoth, Craig J., ‘Created in Its Image: The Race Analogy, Gay Identity, and Gay Litigation in the 1950s-1970s’, Yale Law Journal , 119 (2009), 316–72

*Loftin, Craig M, ed.,  Letters to One: Gay and Lesbian Voices from the 1950s and 1960s  (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2012), pp. 151-196

*Stein, Marc,  Rethinking the Gay and Lesbian Movement (New York: Routledge, 2012), pp. 5-12

Seminar Eight Topics

1. Why did states police sexuality in the 1950s and 1960s?

2.  What effect did this have on homophile activism?

3. How did activists begin to construct their identity in the face of this oppression?

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Seminar Nine:  The Process of News Construction

 Seminar Nine Reading

*Alwood, Edward, Straight News: Gays, Lesbians, and the News Media (New York: Columbia University Press, 1996), pp. 19-79 (Copies will be made available)

*Doty, Robert C., ‘Growth of Overt Homosexuality in City Provokes Wide Concern’, The New York times. , 17 December 1963, pp. 1, 33

Gamson, J., ‘Lesbians, Gays, Straights, and the Media’,  GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies  , 6 (2000), 451–454

*Schott, Webster, ‘Civil Rights and the Homosexual: A 4-Million Minority Asks for Equal Rights’, The New York times. , 12 November 1967, section Sunday Magazine, pp. 44–45,47, 49–50, 52, 54, 59–60, 62, 64, 66, 69–70, 72

Seminar Nine Topics

1. How were gay men and lesbians portrayed in the mainstream press?

2. Did this change?

3.  Who was speaking for gay men and lesbians in the mainstream press?

4. How did homophile activists approach mainstream publicity?

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Seminar Ten: Representations and Stereotypes

Seminar Ten Reading

*Escoffier, Jeffrey, American Homo: Community and Perversity (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998), pp 79-99. Available online at: http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/view? docId=ft0q2n99kf&chunk.id=d0e1599&toc.depth=1&toc.id=d0e1599&brand=ucpress

Jaffe, Natalie, ‘No Male-Female Parallel Found for Homosexuals’,  The New York times. , 1 May 1966, p. 116

*Loftin, Craig M, ed.,  Letters to One: Gay and Lesbian Voices from the 1950s and 1960s  (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2012), pp. 197-220

Nemy, Enid, ‘The Woman Homosexual: More Assertive, Less Willing to Hide’, The New York times. , 17 November 1969, p. 62

Schumach, Murray, ‘Morals: On the Third Sex’, The New York times. , 7 May 1967, p. 223

Seminar Ten Topics

1. What were some common stereotypes surrounding the LGBT community in the 1950s and 1960s?

2. How did gay men and lesbians attempt to combat these stereotypes?

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Seminar Eleven: Stonewall

Seminar Eleven Reading

‘4 Policemen Hurt in “Village” Raid: Melee Near Sheridan Square Follows Action at Bar’,  The New York times. , 29 June 1969, p. 33 

‘Police Again Rout “Village” Youths: Outbreak by 400 Follows a Near-Riot Over Raid’,  The New York times. , 30 June 1969, p. 22

*Alwood, Edward,  Straight News: Gays, Lesbians, and the News Media (New York: Columbia University Press, 1996), pp. 80-98 (Copies will be made available)

*Armstrong, Elizabeth A., and Suzanna M. Crage, ‘Movements and Memory: The Making of the Stonewall Myth’,  American Sociological Review , 71 (2006), 724–751

Carter, David,  Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution  (New York: St. Martin’s Griffin, 2004)

Duberman, Martin B,  Stonewall  (New York: Plume, 1994)

Fosburgh, Lacey, ‘Thousands of Homosexuals Hold A Protest Rally in Central Park’, The New York times. , 29 June 1970, pp. 1, 29

Seminar Eleven Topics

1. What is the Stonewall Myth?

2. Why is it important?

3. How was the Stonewall myth created?

4. Why has it survived?


This list was last updated on 28/04/2014