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PIED5275M
5275 Reading list and Seminars

Political Economy of Resources and Development, 2019/20, Semester 1
Professor Ray Bush
R.C.Bush@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Lecture and Seminar Plan

Essential readings are listed in this module handbook for the weekly seminar.  READ AT LEAST TWO OF THEM.

This handbook is essential. I encourage you to print it so you always have it available for consultation and review. See the reading list on the library site to move to additional readings. Note that the reading list is extensive but not exhaustive. The range of references will ensure you have a good understanding of the topics under discussion. You must supplement these readings with sources that you uncover and develop as part of the materials necessary to write your two assignments: mid-term (formative, non-assessed) annotated bibliography and the assessed 4,000 word Research Report.

Selection of journals to explore further

The Extractives Industries and Society

Capital and Class

Globalizations

Historical Materialism

Human Geography

Latin American Perspectives

Journal of Contemporary Asia

Review of African Political Economy

New Left Review

Monthly Review

New Political Economy

Review of International Political Economy

Resources Policy

Journal of Peasant Studies

Journal of Agrarian Change

Selection of Key Readings that will often be referred to

Check out useful ref guide;

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334051449_Pluriverse_A_Post-Development_Dictionary_AUF_2019_NEW_BOOK_edited_by_Ashish_Kothari_Ariel_Salleh_Arturo_Escobar_Federico_Demaria_and_Alberto_Acosta_Download_full_ebook_for_free_PDF_License_Creative_Co

Special Issue of Journal of Peasant Studies vol42, 3-4, 2015 Land Grabbing

John Smith, 2016 Imperialism in the 21st Century

Ben Selwyn 2017 The Struggle for Development

R Bush (2007) Poverty and Neoliberalism

H Ayeb and R Bush (2019) Food Insecurity and Revolution .

H Akram-Lodhi and C Kay eds, (2009) Peasants and Globalisation

J Ferguson (2006) Global Shadows: Africa in the neoliberal world order

John-Andrew McNeish and Owen Logan eds,(2012) Flammable Societies

Rami Zurayk, Eckart Woertz and Rachel Bahn, eds., (2018) Crisis and Conflict in Agriculture

Raj Patel and Jason Moore (2017) A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things

Campling, Liam et al. 2016. ‘Class Dynamics of Development: a methodological note’. Third World Quarterly, 37, 10, 1745-1767

M Mowforth (2014) The Violence of Development

Fabiana Li (2015) Unearthing Conflict

H Veltmeyer and James Petras eds., (2014) The New Extractivism

Terry Lynn Karl (1997) The Paradox of Plenty: Oil Booms and Petro-States and her ‘The Perils of the Petro-State: Reflections on the Paradox of Plenty, Journal of International Affairs, Fall 1999, 53, 1

Bonnie Campbell ed (2009) Mining in Africa

______________ ed (2013) Modes of Governance and Revenue Flows in African Mining

Rosemary Thorp et al (2012) The Developmental Challenges of Mining and Oil

A Bebbington and J Bury eds (2013) Subterranean Struggles, new dynamics of mining, oil and gas in Latin America

Haroon Akram-Lodhi and C Kay (2010) eds Peasants and Globalization

Tony Weis (2007) The Global Food Economy

Raul Delgado Wise and Henry Veltmeyer (2016) Agrarian Change, Migration and Development

Henry Bernstein (2010) Class Dynamics of Agrarian Change

J van Der Ploeg (2013) Peasants and the Art of Farming

Philip McMichael (2013) Food Regimes and Agrarian Questions

Global Witness, www.GlobalWitness.org

Bank Information Centre, http://www.bicusa.org/

World Development Movement mining and food, http://www.wdm.org.uk/

Mining Watch Canada

http://www.sharing.org/information-centre/reports

 

Look at recent issues of the annual, The Mine, published by PricewaterhouseCoopers for the views from the companies and the World Bank extractive industries pages http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/extractiveindustries

Oxfam https://www.culturalsurvival.org/latest

Jason Moore, 2015, Capitalism in the Web of Life

Week One Beginning 30/10/19

Introduction and work allocation for seminar/reading groups 

Note there is NO lecture in Week 1. Come to the seminar for work allocation

Week Two Beginning 7/10/19

Lecture: Post War Capitalism – the Promise and the Failure

This lecture examines the character of post war reconstruction focusing on the shifts between optimism for growth and (under) development in the Global South.

Everyone see, Anna Lappé (2019) ‘Follow the money to the Amazon’, https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/09/follow-money-amazon/597319/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=share

Wallerstein, Immanuel. “Braudel on Capitalism, or Everything Upside Down.” The Journal of Modern History 63, no. 2 (June 1, 1991): 354–61. https://doi.org/10.2307/2938489

Then,

Essential Reading:

Philip McMichael (2016) [but also previous editions] Development and Social Change [framing chapter or one on globalisation]

Philip McMichael (2000) ‘World-Systems Analysis, Globalisation, and Incorporated Comparison’, Journal of World-Systems Research 6, 3, 668-90

Alfredo Saad-Filho (2007) Neo liberalism and the Left, A Symposium in L Panitch and Colin

Leys eds, Global Flashpoints, Socialist Register 2008

Ben Fine and Alfredo Saad-Filho (2017) ‘Thirteen Things You Need to Know about Neo-Liberalism’ in Critical Sociology vol43, (4-5) 685-706

Ben Selwyn 2017 The Struggle for Development

M T Huber (2008) From Lifeblood to Addiction: Oil, Space, and the Wage-Relation in Petro-Capitalist USA’ Human Geography 1

Branko Milanovic (2003) ‘The Two Faces of Globalisation: Against Globalisation as we know it’ World Development 31 (4) 667-83

Jason Moore 2015, Capitalism in the Web of Life

T Piketty (2014) Capital in the 21st Century

A Bebbington and J Bury Political Ecologies of the Sub Soil’ ch 1 in A Bebbington and J Bury eds 2013 Subterranean Struggles, new dynamics of mining, oil and gas in Latin America

Naomi Klein (2014) This Changes Everything

Chang, Ha-Joon & Ilene Grabel (2004) Reclaiming Development Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective (Anthem; 2002)

Ha Joon Chang (2010) 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism.

David Miller ‘How neoliberalism got where it is: Elite planning, Corporate Lobbying and the Release of the Free Market’ in K Birch and V Mykhnenko eds (2010)The Rise and Fall of Neoliberalism

EA Brett (2009) Reconstructing Development Theory [part 3]

Campling, Liam et al. 2016. ‘Class Dynamics of Development: a methodological note’. Third World Quarterly, 37, 10, 1745-1767

John Smith 2016, Imperialism in the 21st century

Additional

Peter Lawrence (2010) ‘The African Tragedy: International and national roots’ in V Padayachee ed, The Political Economy of Africa

Ray Bush (2018) ‘Africa: A Political Economy of Continued Crisis’ Afrika Focus vol 31,1,23-46, available at  https://doi.org/10.21825/af.v31i2.9915

Alfredo Saad-Filho and D Johnston eds (2005) Neo-Liberalism

Week Three

14/10/19

Lecture: Cursing Resources? Extractives and (under)development

This lecture introduces the way in which investment in mineral led growth has repeatedly been offered as a panacea for economic development in the Global South. It explores the notion of a ‘resource curse’, namely that there is an inverse relationship between mineral led development and economic growth. It also begins to explore some of the experiences and strategies in the global South to ameliorate the political economy of extractives

Essential Reading:

See the World Bank extractives page http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/extractiveindustries

The Africa Mining Vision  http://www.africaminingvision.org/ 

Anthony Bebbington et al (2008) ‘Contention and Ambiguity: Mining and the Possibilities of Development’, Development and Change 39,6,887-914

Michael L Ross ‘The Political Economy of The Resource Curse’ in World Politics 51 Jan 1999, 297-322

Henry Veltmeyer and James Petras (2014) The New Extractivism ch1

Pegg, Scott, 2003. Poverty reduction or poverty exacerbation? World Bank Group support for extractive industries in Africa. A Report sponsored by Oxfam America, Friends of the Earth-US, Environmental Defense, Catholic Relief Services and the Bank Information Center. Oxfam America, Boston

A Rosser (2006) The Political Economy of the Resource, IDS Working Paper 268 http://r4d.dfid.gov.uk/PDF/Outputs/futurestate/wp268.pdf

On codes of conduct, Worldbank.org and www.eireview.org, and International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM)2006, Resource Endowment Initiative: Synthesis of Four Country Case Studies, and https://www.icmm.com/en-gb

http://www.publishwhatyoupay.org

on free prior and informed consent see inter alia https://www.culturalsurvival.org/news/oxfam-guide-free-prior-and-informed-consent

www.africaminingvision.org

World Bank (2015) Extractives Review 2015 https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/2eaabb804ae4b8799548bdbfe70b6aa3/WBG+in+Extractive+Industries+-+2015+Annual+Review+.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

World Bank. (2009) Extractive Industries Value Chain http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTOGMC/Resources/ei_for_development_3.pdf

Refer to debate about free, prior and informed consent, Oxfam, among others and https://www.culturalsurvival.org/latest

Hilson Abigail, Hilson Gavin, Dauda Suleman (2019) Corporate Social Responsibility at African mines: Linking the past to the present, Journal of Environmental Management 241 pp. 340-352 

Bonnie Campbell ed (2013) Modes of Governance and Revenue Flows in African Mining Introduction; chapter 1 by Jacobs and Conclusion.

J Ovadia (2011), ‘The Role of Local Content policies in the natural resource based development’ http://www.oefse.at/fileadmin/content/Downloads/Publikationen/Oepol/Artikel2015/Teil1_03_Ovadia.pdf

On the politics of neo extractivism in Latin America

J Petras and H Veltmeyer (2018) ‘Class Struggle Back on the Agenda in Latin America’, Journal of Developing Societies, 34,1

Liisa North and Ricardo Grinspun, (2016) ‘Neo Extractivism and the New Latin American developmentalism: the missing piece of rural transformation’, Third World Quarterly, 37,8,1483-1504

Vergara-Camus, Leandro and Cristóbel Kay. (2017a) ‘Agribusiness, peasants, left wing governments, and the state in Latin America: An overview and theoretical reflection’. In Journal of Agrarian Change vol 17. 239-257

Vergara-Camus, Leandro and Cristóbel Kay. (2017b) ‘The agrarian political economy of left wing governments in Latin America: Agribusiness, Peasants, and the limits of neo-developmentalism’, in Journal of Agrarian Change, vol 17. 415-437

A Acosta (2013) Extractivism and neo extractivism: Two sides of the same curse, in M Lang and D Mokrain eds., Beyond Development: an alternative vision from Latin America   

On the impact of mining in the South see

 Ben Radley (2019) Rethinking the Failures of Mining industrialisation https://developingeconomics.org/2019/05/31/rethinking-the-failures-of-mining-industrialisation-in-the-african-periphery/

Introduction to R. Thorp et al The Development Challenges of Mining and Oil  

Lee Wengraf 2018. Extracting Profit. Imperialism, Neoliberalism and the New Scramble for Africa

Fabian Li (2015) Unearthing Conflict

You might listen to Henry Veltmeyer, (2014) ‘Perils of a primary Commodity Export Strategy’ at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSLhKTlgw6o

Special Issue of Extractive Industries and Society vol4 4, Nov 2017, intro by Miles Larmer and Vito Laterza. ‘Contested Wealth: Social and Political Mobilisation in extractive communities in Africa’ and then look at the different case studies.

A good introduction to the structural limits is Ben Fine in Review of African Political Economy 45,156, June 2018 pp292-299

Ray Bush (2010) ‘Conclusion: Mining, Dispossession and Transformation in Africa’ in A Fraser and M Larmer eds Boom and Bust

See the special issue of Extractives Industries and Society vol 4, 3, July 2017

Look at the debate about free, prior and informed consent inter alia Special Issue, Third World Quarterly New Mechanism of participation in Extractive Governance, vol 38, 5, 2017 (good overview of Free, Prior and informed consent, and a number of case studies) see also for Question 3. And https://www.culturalsurvival.org/latest

J Owen and D Kemp (2014) ‘Free, Prior and Informed Consent, social complexity in the mining Industry’ in Resources Policy, 41, 91-100

S Mahanty and C McDermott (2013) ‘ How does free, prior and informed consent impact social equity’ Land Use Policy 35, Nov 404-416

Thabit Jacob and R Petersen (2018) ‘New Resource Nationalism? Continuity and Change in Tanzania’s Extractive industries’ in Extractive Industries and Society 5, 2, April

I De Soysa (2000) ‘The Resource Curse: Are Civil Wars Driven by Rapacity or Paucity?’ in M. Berdal and D. Malone eds, Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars

Richard M. Auty (1993) Sustaining development in the Mineral Economies: The Resource Curse Thesis

David Keen (2012) Useful Enemies ch 1 & 2

On Nigeria

Michael Watts (2007) ‘Petro Insurgency or Criminal Syndicate? Conflict & Violence in the Niger Delta, Review of African Political Economy 114 vol 34 637-660

Cyril Obi (2010) ‘Oil as the ‘Curse’ of conflict in Africa: Peering through the Smoke & Mirrors’, Review of African Political Economy 37, 126

Kathryn Nwajiaku-Dahou 2012, ‘The Political Economy of Oil and rebellion in Nigeria’s Niger Delta’, Review of African Political Economy 39, 132,

Akin Iwilade 2017 ‘Oil, Youth and Networks of the “unconnected” in Nigeria’s Niger Delta’ Society & Natural Resources 28, 11, pp1203-1215

_________2016 ‘Networks of Violence Journal of Modern African Studies 52,4,pp571-95

Ben Tantun et al (2018) Oil Governance in Nigeria’s Niger Delta. Exploring the role of the militias’ The Extractives Industries & Society vol5, 3, July

Zambia

A Fraser (2010) ‘Introduction: Boom and Bust on the Zambian Copperbelt’ in A Fraser and M Larmer eds Zambia, Mining and Neoliberalism

M Larmer (2010) ‘Historical Perspectives on Zambia’s Mining Booms and Busts’ in ibid.

James Ferguson (1999) Expectations of modernity: Myths and Meanings of Urban Life on the Zambian Copperbelt

John Craig (2000) ‘Evaluating Privatisation in Zambia: A Tale of Two Processes’ in Review of African Political Economy 27, no. 85

Southern African Resource Watch http://old.sarwatch.org/publications/resource-insight.html

A Fraser and J Lungu, (2007) For whom the windfalls? Winners and Losers in the Privatisation of Zambia’s Copper Mines

Look at the African Mining Vision plans for Zambia

Pluralism and Water Resources Management in the Global South: Prospects and Challenges

This session is convened with guest lecturer, Dr Pedi Obani who is Research Fellow at the UN University, Institute for Natural Resources in Africa and Senior Lecturer, dept., of Jurisprudence and International Law, University of Benin, Nigeria.

These session includes a lecture and then seminar discussion focusing on the three questions indicated.

This lecture explores the diverse discourses, principles and normative underpinnings that converge in water resources management in the global South. It uncovers pluralism both within and across various scales, from the national to the local. It also explores how rules incoherence and contradictions determine the impact of specific governance instruments and alternative contexts in which legal pluralism can improve the overall quality of water resources management.

Essential Reading:

Special Issue of Current Opinion on Environmental Sustainability, vol 11, 78-85, 2014 ‘Legal Pluralism in Aquatic Regimes: A Challenge for Governance’

Karen Bakker (2007) ‘The “Commons” Versus the “Commodity”: Alter-globalization, Anti-privatization and the Human Right to Water in the Global South’

Bryan Randolph Bruns and Ruth S Meinzen-Dick (2001) ‘Water Rights and Legal Pluralism: Four Contexts for Negotiation’ Natural Resources Forum 25(1), 1-10

Mark Giordano and Tushaar Shah (2014) ‘From IWRM back to integrated water resources management’ International Journal of Water Resources Development 30(3), 364-376

RS Meinzen-Dick and R Pradhan (2001) ‘Implications of Legal Pluralism for Natural Resource Management’ Ids Bulletin

J Hoogesteger, R Boelens and M Baud (2016) ‘Territorial Pluralism: Water Users’ Multi-scalar Struggles against State Ordering in Ecuador’s Highlands’ Water International

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Familiarise the cohort with the manifestations of pluralism in water resources management
  1. Support the cohort to develop a critical awareness of the merits and shortcomings of pluralism in natural resources management generally

Questions to begin discussion;

  1. What types of pluralism exist in water resources management in the context of the Global South?
  1. Is pluralism essential for the sustainable management of water and other natural resources?
  1. How do you think pluralism can influence the prospect of 'water wars'? Could it be a trigger or a panacea for tensions or conflicts over water resources?

Seminar: Raw Materials: Mineral Led Growth – the political economy of the enclave, resource curse and Artisanal small scale mining

Discussion:

1.What do you understand by enclave development?

2.How valid is the notion of the ‘resource curse’?

3.How do you explain the presence of artisanal miners?

4.ASM – polluter and robbers or community developers?

On the companies see, www.bp.com and www.shell.com and www.goldfields.com - you might all refer to these as you also look at academic writing for the questions below

Look at recent issues of the annual The Mine published by PricewaterhouseCoopers

Revisit the Africa Union’s African Mining Vision 2050

Reading on Q1:

Ben Radley (2019) Rethinking the Failures of Mining industrialisation https://developingeconomics.org/2019/05/31/rethinking-the-failures-of-mining-industrialisation-in-the-african-periphery/

Ray Bush (2010) ‘Conclusion: Mining, Dispossession and Transformation in Africa’ in A Fraser and M Larmer eds Boom and Bust

A Bebbington et al (2008) ‘Contention and Ambiguity: Mining and the Possibilities of Development’ Development and Change 39, 6, 887-914

Michael L Ross ‘The Political Economy of The Resource Curse’ World Politics 51 Jan-1999, 297-322

R Thorp et al (2012) The Developmental Challenges of Mining and Oil. Lessons from Africa and Latin America

Pegg Scott, 2003. Poverty reduction or poverty exacerbation? World Bank Group support for extractive industries in Africa. A Report sponsored by Oxfam America, Friends of the Earth-US, Environmental Defense, Catholic Relief Services and the Bank Information Center. Oxfam America

R Auty (2000) ‘How Natural Resources Affect Economic Development’ Development Policy Review 18, 347-364

K McPhail ‘How Oil, Gas and Mining Projects Can Contribute to Development’ in Finance and Development Dec 2000

J Ferguson (2006) Global Shadows: Africa in the neoliberal world order

J Bury (2005) ‘Mining Mountains, neoliberalism, land tenure, livelihoods and the new Peruvian mining industry in Cajamarca Environment and Planning A 37,221-239

Reading on Q2:

Anthony Bebbington et al (2008) ‘Contention and Ambiguity: Mining and the Possibilities of Development’, Development and Change 39, 6, 887-914

Gavin Hilson ed (2010) Enclaves of Wealth and Hinterlands of Discontent   

Graham A Davis & JE Tilton (2005) ‘The Resource Curse’ Natural Resources Forum 29 233-242

See the African Mining Vision 2030 and linked web site at the Africa Union

G Bridge 2004 ‘ Contested Terrain, Mining and Development’ Annual review of Environment and resources 29

O Logan and J-Andre McNeish ‘Rethinking Responsibility in resource Extraction’ ch1 in their ed (2012) Flammable Societies

Richard M. Auty (1993) Sustaining development in the Mineral Economies: The Resource Curse Thesis

One of ;Richard M Auty (2002) ‘The ‘resource curse’ in developing countries’ in V Desai and R B Potter eds (2002) The Companion to Development Studies

Richard M Auty (1997) Natural Resource Endowment: The State and Development Strategy’ in Journal of International Development, 9, (4) 651-663

Pierre Ambramovici (2004) ‘Precious Resources in Need of Protection: US and the New Scramble for Africa’ Le Monde Diplomatique (English version) July

Reading on Q3:

Hilson, Gavin, Goumandakoye, Halima and Diallo, Penda (2019) Formalizing Artisanal Mining ‘Spaces’ in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Niger Land Use Policy, 80. pp. 259-268.

Hilson, G., Potter, C. (2005) Structural adjustment and subsistence industry: artisanal gold mining in Ghana. Development and Change 36(1): 103-131.

Sadia Mohemmad Banchirigah, (2008) ‘Challenges with eradicating illegal mining in Ghana. A perspective from the grassroots’ Resources Policy 33, 1, March 29-31

N Yakovleva (2007) ‘Perspectives on Female participation in artisanal small scale mining: case of Birim Ghana Resources Policy 32 1-2 29-41

Knud Sinding (2005) ‘the Dynamics of Artisanal small scale mining reform’ in Natural Resources Forum 29, 243-52

Reading on Q4:

Ray Bush,(2009) ‘Soon there will be no-one left to take the corpses to the morgue’: Accumulation and abjection in Ghana's mining communities’ Journal of Resources Policy, January

Ciaran O’Faircheallaigh and Tony Corbett (2016) ‘Understanding and improving policy and regulatory responses to artisanal and small scale mining’ in The Extractive Industries and Society vol 5, issue 4 November

T Zvarivadza (2018), ‘Artisanal and Small Scale Miners as a challenge and possible contributor to Sustainable Development’ in Resources Policy  56 June

Hentschel, T., Nruschka, F., Priester, F. (2002) Global Report on Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining. Working Paper 70, Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development (MMSD) Project. London: International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).

Hilson, G. (2008) ‘A Load too Heavy’: A Critical Examination of the Child Labor Problem in African Artisanal Mining Communities Children and Youth Services Review 30: 1233-1245.   

Hilson, G. (2006) Abatement of mercury pollution in the small-scale gold mining industry: Restructuring the policy and research agendas. The Science of the Total Environment 362(1-3): 1-14.

Hilson, G (2010) ‘Child Labour in African Artisanal Mining Communities: Experiences from Northern Ghana’ in Development and Change 41, 3, 445-473

R Maconachie and G Hilson (2011) ‘Artisanal gold mining: A new frontier in post-conflict Sierra Leone? The Journal of Development Studies 47 4, pp595-616

G Hilson (2011) ‘ A conflict of Interest? A critical examination of Artisanal/Large Scale miner relations in Sub-Saharan Africa, in F Botchway ed New Directions in Resource Investment and African Development   

G Hilson (2017), ‘Shootings and burning excavators: Some rapid reflections on the government of Ghana’s handling of internal galamsey menace’ Resources Policy  54, Dec

Hilson Gavin, Hilson Abigail, Siwale Agatha, Maconachie Roy (2018) Female faces in informal spaces: Women and artisanal and small-scale mining in sub-Saharan Africa, Africa Journal of Management 4 (3) pp. 306-346 

 

Week Six Reading and Assignment Week

No Lecture or Seminar. Assignment week but also note book launch Food Insecurity and Revolution in the Middle East and North Africa: Agrarian Questions in Egypt and Tunisia with authors Habib Ayeb and Ray Bush, POLIS seminar room 7 November 16.00-17.30 Also guest speakers and films introduced by film maker Habib Ayeb, Cous Cous and Landless Moroccans by film maker Soraya El Kahlaoui – location/time of films tbc.

Develop your bibliography for your research report using a range of resources including library, data base and electronic searches. Identify which sources you will use in the different sections of your assessment and locate these refs in the context of questions you want to explore in your report. Submit a minimum non assessed 4 page annotated bibliography in your class in week 7.

 Week Seven Seminar: Seminar: Labour: Labour and the World Economy

Questions:

  1. What role has migrant labour played in the development of capitalism historically?
  2. Is migrant (or ‘unfree’) labour essential to capitalism?
  3. What have been the major trends in the use of migrant labour? 
  4. What other forms of ‘adverse incorporation’ of labour into capitalist development exist? Would you include the crisis of refugees?

Everyone must look at the recent reports form the International Organisation of Migration https://www.iom.int

And www.ilo.org

For each of these questions look at, John Smith 2016 Imperialism in the 21st century especially chapters 4 & 7

See also, R.D. Wise and H Veltmeyer (2016) Agrarian Change, Migration and Development

Reading for everyone: Stephen Castles 2010, ‘Understanding Global Migration: A Social Transformation Perspective’ Ethnic and Migration Studies  36, 10,

Reading on Q1:

Selwyn, B. (2016). ‘Elite development theory: a labour-centred critique’, Third World Quarterly, 37 (5), 781-799 

_______(2017) The Struggle for Development

Uma Kothari, (2002) ‘Migration and Chronic Poverty’ Institute for Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester, Chronic Poverty Research Centre, Working Paper no. 16 at, www.chronicpoverty.org/cp16htm

Hannah Cross 2015 ‘Finance, Development and Remittances: Extending the Scale of Accumulation in Migrant Labour Regimes’ Globalizations 12, 3, pp305-321

I Bakker 2007, ‘Social Reproduction and the Constitution of a Gendered Political Economy’ New Political Economy  12, 4, 541-556

Teresa Hayter (2004) Open Borders: The Case Against Immigration Controls

Jonathon Moses (2 International Migration    

 

Hanna

Reading on Q2:

H Cross (2013) Migrants, Borders and global capitalism

R Cohen (1987)The New Helots: Migrants in the International Division of Labour

(2001) Global Diasporas: An Introduction

Hannah Cross and Lionel Cliffe 2017 ‘A Comparative political economy of regional migration and labour mobility in West and Southern Africa’ Review of African Political Economy 44, 153, 381-398

R Miles Capitalism and Unfree Labour: Anomaly or Necessity?

K Bales (1999) Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy

Reading on Q3:

Huysmans, J. (2000). ‘The European Union and the Securitisation of Migration’, Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 38, No. 5: 751-77.

 http://mondediplo.com/maps/

Post-2015 info seems to be best in blogs and journalism, for example,  http://www.transform-network.net/uploads/tx_news/Policy_Advice_Paper_1-2015_EN_v3.pdf

http://www.yaghmaian.com/publication/op-ed/the-press-project-what-greece%CE%84s-new-government-mean-for-migration-polic

N van Hear 2010 ‘Theories of Migration and Social Change’ in Ethnic and Migration Studies 36 June

Jan Hjarnø, (2003) Illegal immigrants and developments in employment in the labour markets of the EU

B Jordan and Franck Duvell (2002) Irregular Migration: The Dilemmas of Transnational Mobility

UNHCR, The State of The World's Refugees 2006: Human Displacement in the New Millennium http://www.unhcr.org/4a4dc1a89.html

UNHCR (2000) The State of the World’s Refugees: Fifty Years of Humanitarian Action

International Office for Migration (2000) Look For Subsequent Reports and note trends.

World Migration Report (2009)   

P Stalker (2000) Workers Without Frontiers

L Potts The World Labour Market: A History of Migration

DSMassey and J. E. Taylor (eds) (2004) International Migration: Prospects and Policies in a Global Market

JE Braziel and A Mannur reds (2003) Theorising Diaspora: A Reader

Reading on Q4:

http://www.notforsalecampaign.org/Default.aspx

‘Against The Evidence: Europe’s migration Challenge and the failure to protect’, Special Issue of Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies vol 45, 2019

And, ‘Migration Governance in an Era of Large Movements’, Special Issue of Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies vol 44, 2018

Bridget Anderson 2013 Us & Them? The dangerous Politics of Immigration Control

Nick Bernards 2017, ‘The Global Politics of Forced Labour’ Globalizations 14, 6.

D Kyle And R Koslowski (2001) eds Global Human Smuggling

*D Bryceson, C Kay and J Mooij eds (2000) Disappearing Peasantries? Rural Labour in Africa, Asia and Latin America

Sarah Spence 2018 ‘Multi level governance of an intractable policy problem: migrants with irregular status in Europe’ Ethnic and Migration Studies 44 12

M Guibernau and J Rex (eds) The Ethnicity Reader: Nationalism, Multiculturalism and Migration  section 7 pp257-291 CS

N Papastergiadis (2000) The Turbulence of Migrations

PCorrigan, ‘Feudal Relics or Capitalist Monument? Notes on the Sociology of Unfree Labour’, Sociology Vol.11, 1977, 35–63

T Brass, ‘Slavery Now: Unfree Labour and Modern Capitalism’, Slavery and Abolition Vol. 9, 1988

N Van Hear (1998) The New Diasporas: The Mass Exodus, Dispersal and Regrouping of Migrant Communities

S Suliman 2017, ‘Migration and Development After 2015’ Globalizations 14, 3,

Seminar: Land: Agrarian Questions Old and New

Questions:

  1. What do you understand by Agrarian Questions
  2. How can we explain and account for the production and distribution of food historically?
  3. What do you understand by land reform and has the age of redistributive land reform has passed?
  4. How do you explain the persistence of food riots and protest?

Reading on Q1:

Haroon Akram-Lodhi and C Kay (2010), ‘The Agrarian Question: Peasants and rural change’ in Akram-Lodhi and Kay eds., Peasants and Globalization

Dzodzi Tsikata (2016) ‘Gender, land tenure and sub Saharan Africa’ in Agrarian South vol5,1,1-19

Yeros, P, Jha, P and Moyo, S, (2013) ‘The Classical Agrarian Question : Reality and Relevance Today’ in Agrarian South. Journal of Political Economy  2, 93

Samir Amin (2017) ‘The Agrarian Question a Century after October 1917: Capitalist Agriculture and Agricultures in Capitalism’ in Agrarian South: Journal of Political Economy, vol 6 no. 2 August 149-176

Rachel Bahn and Rami Zurayk, (2018) Agriculture, Conflict and the Agrarian Question in the 21st Century, in Rami Zurayk, Eckart Woertz and Rachel Bahn eds., Crisis and Conflict in Agriculture

JD Van der Ploeg,  (2008) The New Peasantries

Henry Bernstein (2004) ‘Considering Africa’s Agrarian Questions’ Historical Materialism 12,4,115-144

H Bernstein (1996) ‘Agrarian Questions Then and Now’, Journal of Peasant Studies, vol24, number 1 and 2 Special Issue pp22-59

H Bernstein ‘Land Reform in Southern Africa in World Historical Perspective’ in Review of African Political Economy vol 30, no.96, 2003 pp203-226

________(2006) ‘Is there an Agrarian Question in the 21st Century? Canadian Journal of Development Studies

Bernstein, H.(2010) Class Dynamics of Agrarian Change.

___________(2007) ‘Is there an Agrarian Question in the 21st century?’, Canadian Journal of Development Studies, 27, 4, 449-460

Friedmann, Harriet (2016) ‘Bernstein-McMichael-Friedmann Dialogue on Food Regimes. Commentary: Food regime analysis and agrarian questions: widening the conversation’. The Journal of Peasant Studies vol 43, no.3. 671-692

Habib Ayeb and Ray Bush (2019) Food Insecurity and Revolution in the Middle East: Agrarian Questions in Egypt and Tunisia

David Harvey (2003) ‘The ‘New ‘Imperialism: Accumulation by Dispossession’ in Leo Panitch and Colin Leys eds The New Imperial Challenge, Socialist Register 2004

__________(2005) The New Imperialism

Reading on Q2:

Ray Bush and Giuliano Martiniello (2017) ‘Food Riots and Protest: Agrarian Modernisations and Structural Crises’, World Development 91 pp193-207

Raj Patel and Jason W. Moore (2017) A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things

Raj Patel (2007) Stuffed and Starved: Markets, Power and the Hidden Battle for the World Food System

Philip McMichael (2013) Food Regimes and Agrarian Questions or his

‘A food Regime Analysis of the ‘World Food Crisis’ ‘ Agriculture and Human Values 26, 4, 281-95

Habib Ayeb and Ray Bush (2019) Food Insecurity and Revolution in the Middle East: Agrarian Questions in Egypt and Tunisia especially chapter 4

FAO, The state of food insecurity in the world 2013 http://www.fao.org/publications/SOFI/en/

FAO, Committee on food security http://www.fao.org/cfs/en/

Timothy A Wise (2019) Eating Tomorrow

McMichael, P. 2013, 'Historicizing food sovereignty: a food regime perspective', paper presented at Yale

http://www.tni.org/briefing/historicizing-food-sovereignty?context=69566

McMichael Food Regimes and Agrarian Questions chapters 2-3

Also his ‘A Food regime Geneology’ in Journal of Peasant Studies 36,1 January 2009

Clapp, Jennifer & S. Ryan Isakson. (2018). Speculative Harvests.   

H Friedmann and P McMichael 1989 ‘Agriculture and the state system: the rise and fall of national agricultures, 1870 to the present’ Sociologia Ruralis 29, 2,

H Bernstein (2010) Class Dynamics of Agrarian Change ch4

S M Borras et al ‘The politics of biofuels, land and agrarian change: editors introduction’ and

Ben White and A Dasgupta ‘Agrofuels capitalism: a view from political economy’, The Journal of Peasant Studies vol 37, 4, October, 2010

Jason W. Moore (2010) ‘The End of the Road? Agricultural Revolutions in the Capitalist World-Ecology, 1450-2010, Journal of Agrarian Change vol10, 3

J Clapp & S. Ryan Isakson (2018) Speculative Harvests 

Peter M. Rosset & Miguel A. Altieri (2017) Agroecology

Reading on Q3:

A Haroon Akram-Lodhi, et al eds (2007) Land, Poverty and Livelihoods in an Era of Globalization

Krishna Ghimire (2001) ed. Land Reform and Peasant Livelihoods: The Social Dynamics of Rural Poverty and Agrarian Reforms in Developing Countries

Moore Bruce. H (2001) ‘Empowering the Rural Poor Through Land Reform and Improved Access to Productive Assets’, in Ghimire, Krishna B. (2001) ed. Whose Land? Civil Society Perspectives on Land Reform and Rural Africa, Asia and Latin America. Geneva: UNRISD

Ray Bush (2002) ‘Land Reform and Counter Revolution’ in Ray Bush ed Counter Revolution in Egypt’s Countryside: Land and Farmers in an Era of Economic Reform

Cotula, L. (2012) ‘The international political economy of the global land rush: A critical appraisal of trends, scale, geography and drivers’. Journal of Peasant Studies, 39 (3&4)

Alden-Wily, L., (2012) ‘Looking back to see forward: the legal niceties of land theft in land rushes’. Journal of Peasant Studies, 39 (3&4)

Transnational Institute (TNI) (2012) The Global Land Grab. A Primer. http://www.tni.org/sites/www.tni.org/files/download/landgrabbingprimer_0.pdf (accessed 29 April 2013)

Reading on Q4:

Ray Bush and Giuliano Martiniello (2017) ‘Food riots and protest: Agrarian Modernisations and Structural Crises’, World Development https://worldecologynetwork.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/bush-and-martinello-food-riots-and-protest-agrarian-modernizations-and-structural-crises-2017-wd.pdf

Ayeb, Habib, and Ray Bush. (2014). ‘Small Farmer Uprisings and Rural Neglect in Egypt and Tunisia.’ Middle East Research and Information Project 272, 44 (3, Fall):

Beinin, Joel. 2016. Workers and Thieves: Labor Movements and Popular Uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt.

Special Issue of Journal of Agrarian Change, ‘The Agrarian Roots of Violent Conflict, vol11, no3 July 2011

Ray Bush (2018) ‘The Arab Spring’ in North Africa: Egypt and Tunisia, in Zurayk et al eds

Stefan Andreasson (2006) ‘Stand and Deliver: Private Property and the Politics of Global Dispossession’ Political Studies, 54, 3-2

Samir Amin 2012 ‘Contemporary Imperialism and the Agrarian Question’ Agrarian South 1,1, 11-26

Ruth Hall et al eds 2015 Africa’s Land Rush esp. Introduction

Monthly Review 2013 ‘21st Century Land Grabs Monthly Review 65, 6, Nov

And on the Dakota Access Pipeline, Standing Rock http://standwithstandingrock.net/category/news/

Holy rage, lessons from standing rock, http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/holy-rage-lessons-from-standing-rock

Lecture: Land Grabs and Transfers

This lecture looks at the range and spread of what have been called global land grabs. It will explore the scale of global transactions in land and what some of the consequences of these have been.

S.M.Borras and J.C.Franco (2012) ‘A Land Sovereignty’ Alternative? Towards a Peoples Counter-Enclosure’ July available at https://www.tni.org/files/a_land_sovereignty_alternative_.pdf

Ruth Hall et al eds (2015) Africa’s Land RushEspecially Intro, then choose a case study.

Special Issue of Journal of Peasant Studies vol42, 3-4, 2015 Land Grabbing

Transnational Institute (TNI) (2012) The Global Land Grab. A Primer. http://www.tni.org/sites/www.tni.org/files/download/landgrabbingprimer_0.pdf (accessed 29 April 2013)

Tony Allan, Martin Keulertz, Suvi Sojamo, and Jeroen Warner, eds., (2013) Handbook of Land and Water Grabs in Africa: Foreign Direct Investment and Food and Water Security

Monthly Review,(2013) 21st century Land Grabs, Monthly Review, 65,6, Nov

Anseeuw, W., M.Boche, T Breu., M., Giger, J. Lay, P., Messerli & K., Nolte (2012)

Transnational Land Deals for Agriculture in the Global South: Analytic Report based

on the Land Matrix Database International Land Coalition (Bern/Montpelier/Hamburg:

CDE/CIRAD/GIGA), http://www.landcoalition.org/publications/transational-land-deals-agriculture-global-south

Land Matrix (2012) The Land Matrix, Beta version: the Online public database on

land deals (ILC/CIRAD?SDE?GIGA?GIZ), http://landportal.info/landmatrix

www.Farmlandgrab.org

Marion Dixon (2013) South South land grabbing: what the case of Egypt and its southern neighbours reveals, http://www.farmlandgrab.org/post/view/22920-south-south-land-grabbing-what-the-case-of-egypt-and-its-southern-neighbours-reveals

Journal of Peasant Studies vol 37, 4, 2010

 

Seminar: Land grabs and transfers

Questions

  1. What is the scale of land transfers (grabs)?
  2. How do you explain the presence of land transfers?
  3. What has been some of the impact of land grabs?
  4. Does the case of Fast Track Land reform in Zimbabwe illustrate a counter to private and or international land grabs?

Readings Q1:

Readings for the lecture above;

Special Issue of (2011) Review of African Political Economy vol38, no.128, June esp essay by Ruth Hall.

Special Issue of (2009) Third World Quarterly: Market-Led Agrarian Reform: trajectories and contestations. Vol 28 no.8

A Haroon Akram-Lodhi, et al eds (2007) Land, Poverty and Livelihoods in an Era of Globalization

Readings Q2:

Alden-Wily, L., (2012) ‘Looking back to see forward: the legal niceties of land theft in

land rushes’. In Special Issues Journal of Peasant Studies, 39 (3&4)

Ray Bush (2007) Poverty and Neoliberalism chapter 4

Saturnino Borras Jr an Wolfgang Sachs and Tilman Santarius eds Fair Future (2007) chapters 3&4

Krishna Ghimire (2001) ed. Land Reform and Peasant Livelihoods: The Social Dynamics of Rural Poverty and Agrarian Reforms in Developing Countries

Food crisis and the global land grab

http://farmlandgrab.org/

Readings Q3:

S Borras and J Franco (2010) ‘From threat to opportunity? Problems with the idea of a ‘code of conduct’ for land grabbing. Yale Human Rights and Development Law Journal 13, 1

Ruth Hall, Marc Edelman et al.(2016) Resistance, acquiescence or incorporation? An introduction to land grabbing and political reactions ‘from below’

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi /full/10.1080/03066150.2015.10 36746

W Wolford,Saturnino Borras and Ruth Hall eds Land Deals: The Role of the State in the Rush for Land

Anthony Pahnke, Rebecca Tarlau and Wendy Wolford (2016) Understanding rural resistance: contemporary mobilization in the Brazilian countryside Journal of Peasant Studies

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi /full/10.1080/03066150.2015.10 46447

Tsegaye Moreda (2017) ‘Large Scale Land Acquisitions, state authority and indigenous local communities: insights from Ethiopia’ in Third World Quarterly 38,3.

Kjersti Thorkildsen (2016) Land yes, dam no!’ Justice-seeking strategies by the anti-dam movement in the Ribeira Valley, Brazil Journal of Peasant Studies

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi /full/10.1080/03066150.2016.12 17842

Readings Q4

Ian Scoones, (2010) ‘Chapter 1’ in Scoones, ed. Zimbabwe’s land reform: myths and realities

H Bernstein ‘Land Reform in Southern Africa in World Historical Perspective’ in Review of African Political Economy vol 30, no.96, 2003 pp203-226

Review of African Political Economy,(2019) vol 46, number 159, Agrarian Change in Zimbabwe. See articles that cover the general and farm workers, gender and the state. See also the introduction by Grasien Mkodzongi and Peter Lawrence in Review of African Political Economy 46, 159 Special issues on Agrarian Change in Zimbabwe

Mkodzongi, Grasian. (2018). ‘Peasant Agency in a Changing Agrarian Situation in Central Zimbabwe: The Case of Mhondoro Ngezi’. Agrarian South: Journal of Political Economy, 7,(2) 188-210

Moyo, S. (2011). ‘Land concentration and accumulation after redistributive reform in Zimbabwe’, Review of African Political Economy, 38. 128. June: 257–76.

 Ian Scoones, (2010) ‘Chapter 1’ in Scoones, ed. Zimbabwe’s land reform: myths and realities

Sachikonye, L. (2003) ‘'From 'Growth with Equity' to 'Fast-Track' Reform: Zimbabwe's Land Question’, Review of African Political Economy No. 96, pp. 227-40

See also by Sachikonye, ‘Old wine in new bottles? Revisiting contract farming after agrarian reform in Zimbabwe’ in Review of African Political Economy 43,S1 86-98

Cliffe, L. (2000) ‘The Politics of Land Reform in Zimbabwe’, in Boyer-Bower and Stoneman, eds., Land reform in Zimbabwe: constraints and prospects

Bush, R. and Szeftel, M. (2000) ‘Commentary - The Struggle for Land’, Review of African Political Economy No.84, pp.173-80

Rory Pilossof (2014) ‘Fantasy and Reality: Fast Track Land Reform in Zimbabwe and the New Realities’ Journal of Agrarian Change 14, 1, January

A Hammar (2012) ‘Zimbabwe’s Land Reform: Myths and Realities (review)’ African Studies Review 55,1

Lionel Cliffe et al (2011) ‘An Overview of Fast Track Land Reform in Zimbabwe: Editorial Introduction’, Journal of Peasant Studies 38,5

Lionel Cliffe ‘Land Reform in Zimbabwe, Myths and realities’ Review of African Political Economy

Sam Moyo (2011) ‘Land concentration and accumulation after redistributive reform in post-settler Zimbabwe’ in Review of African Political Economy, 38, 128

Bridget O’Laughlin et al (2013) ‘Introduction: Agrarian change, Rural Poverty and Land Reform in South Africa since 1994’, in Journal of Agrarian Change vol 13, no 1 January

World Bank (1994) South African Agriculture: Structure, Performance and options for the future

Lionel Cliffe (1988) Zimbabwe's agricultural ‘success’ and food security in Southern Africa in Review of African Political Economy 15, 43

Seminar: DEBATE

ESSENTIAL

War on Want, Food Sovereignty http://www.waronwant.org/attachments/Food%20sovereignty%20report.pdf

Borras and Franco, (2012), 'A Land Sovereignty Alternative? Towards a peoples' counter-enclosure'

http://www.tni.org/briefing/land-sovereignty-alternative

McMichael, P. (2013), 'Historicizing food sovereignty: a food regime perspective', paper presented at Yale

http://www.tni.org/briefing/historicizing-food-sovereignty?context=69566

La Via Campesina. (2010). Sustainable peasant and family farm agriculture can feed the world. Available at https://viacampesina.org/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2010/04/Small-Farmere-Feed-the-World.compressed.pdf (accessed 10 April 2019)

Z Babar and S Mirgani eds, (2014) Food security in the Middle East  

  1. Weis (2007) The Global Food Economy. The Battle for the Future of Farming

Half the group to advocate for the following statement and half to oppose it.

Food Sovereignty or Food Security:

Food for all can only be achieved is if there are regulatory policies for new relationships between the market and family agriculture, between producers and consumers and between the North and the South: in short, food sovereignty.

 The argument is played out in

H Bernstein,(2013) ‘'Food sovereignty: a skeptical view', paper presented at Yale

http://www.tni.org/briefing/food-sovereignty-skeptical-view?context=69566

van der Ploeg, J. D. 2013, 'Peasant-driven agricultural growth and food sovereignty', paper presented at Yale

http://www.tni.org/briefing/peasant-driven-agricultural-growth-and-food-sovereignty?context=69566

P McMichael 2013 Food Regimes and agrarian Questions

See special issue of Journal of Peasant Studies 41, 2014

Akram-Lodhi, A. Haroon. (2015) ‘Accelerating towards food sovereignty’.

Third World Quarterly

, 36 (3) 563-583

M Walsh-Dilley et al (2016) ‘Food sovereignty, power, resilience in development practice’ Ecology and Society 21, 1, 11

Ray Bush 2016, Family Farming in the Near East and North Africa

http://www.ipc-undp.org/pub/eng/WP151_Family_farming_in_the_near_East_and_North_Africa.pdf

For Food security see the World Bank material in this handbook, available at www.worldbank.org

Breisinger, Clemens, Teunis van Rheenen et al., 2010. ‘Food Security and Economic Development in the Middle East and North Africa: Current State and Future Perspectives’. International Food Policy Research Institute, Discussion Paper, 00985, May

P M Rosset and M A Altieri 2017 Agroecology

What role do the international institutions play with food sovereignty?

United Nations. (2017) General Assembly Resolution adopted by the General Assembly 20 December. ‘UN Decade of Family Farming 2019-2018 https://digitallibrary.un.org/record/1479766 (accessed 9 April 2019)

United Nations. (2018) General Assembly 73rd Session Resolution Adopted by the General Assembly 17 December 2018. https://viacampesina.org/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/03/UN_Declaration_on_the_rights_of_peasants_and_other_people_working-in-rural_areas.pdf

Those opposing the motion might consider whether there is often a false polarity between sovereignty and security. Is the contrast between food security and food sovereignty a false one..

Hannah Wittman et al (2011) eds Food Sovereignty

Annete Aurelie Desmarais (2007) La Via Campesina: Globalisation and the Power of Peasants

Patnaik, Utsa. (2008) The Republic of Hunger and Other Essays. London. Merlin.  

Rosset, P.M. and M.E. Martinez-Torres. (2012) ‘Rural Social Movements and Agroecology:

Context, Theory and Process’, Ecology and Society 17, 3, 17.

Pauline Peters (2013) ‘Conflicts over land and threats to customary tenure in Africa’ in African Affairs 112, no.449, October

Samir Amin (2008) ‘The Defence of humanity requires the radicalisation of popular struggles’ in L Panitch and C Leys eds Violence Today, Socialist Register 2009

Jason W. Moore (2010) ‘The End of the Road? Agricultural Revolutions in the Capitalist World-Ecology, 1450-2010, Journal of Agrarian Change vol10, 3

J Clapp & S. Ryan Isakson (2018) Speculative Harvests

Peter Rosset (2013) ‘Rethinking agrarian reform, land and territory in La Via Campesina’ in Journal of Peasant Studies 4, 40, 721-775

Ngcoya, M., & Kumarakulasingam, N. (2016). The Lived Experience of Food Sovereignty: Gender, Indigenous Crops and Small‐Scale Farming in Mtubatuba, South Africa. Journal of Agrarian Change

https://doi.org/10.1111/joac.12170

On alternatives….

De Angelis, Massimo. (2012). Crises, Capitalism and Cooperation: Does Capital Need a Commons Fix? In, David Bollier and Silke Helfrich eds., The Wealth of the Commons. A World Beyond Market & State. The Commons Strategy Group. Amherst. Levellers

 

Hamouchene, Hamza. (2017) ‘Jemna in Tunisia: an inspiring land struggle in North Africa’ in Open Democracy 13 April, available at https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/north-africa-west-asia/jemna-in-tunisia-inspiring-land-struggle-in-north-africa/

Peter M. Rosset & Miguel A. Altieri (2017) Agroecology

Borras and Franco, 2012, 'A Land Sovereignty Alternative? Towards a peoples' counter-enclosure'

http://www.tni.org/briefing/land-sovereignty-alternative

McMichael, P. 2013, 'Historicizing food sovereignty: a food regime perspective', paper presented at Yale

http://www.tni.org/briefing/historicizing-food-sovereignty?context=69566

War on Want, Food Sovereignty

http://www.waronwant.org/attachments/Food%20sovereignty%20report.pdf

Eric Holt-Giménez ed (2011) Food Movements Unite! Esp. chapter 1 and 2

See also http://www.foodfirst.org/

‘Farmers and social movements say no to land grabbing’, 13 November 2009

http://www.grain.org/m/?id=268#

Land grabbing and the global food crisis, November 2009

http://www.grain.org/o_files/landgrabbing-presentation-11-2009.pdf

World Bank (2010) ‘Awakening Africa’s Sleeping Giant’ http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTARD/Resources/336681-1231508336979/SleepingGiantFinal.pdf

Research Report Preparation: How to assemble the report and why it is not just another essay assignment.

Assessment

Research Report

You will agree a title with Prof. Bush. 

Identify Your Topic

First, identify your topic. This should take the form of a question or set of related questions that you want to find an answer to. When you have your question, you will need to conduct a literature search that goes beyond the readings for the module.

Review the literature

You should then begin reading around your topic. Start to identify the range of existing debates as well as the key issues that are disputed. What are the key texts that you need to refer to? In your reading look for four things in particular:

[1] the substantive issues – what is being said and claimed about your topic;

[2] the theoretical frameworks being used – what kinds of intellectual approach are brought to bear on the problem;

[3] what is the empirical basis of the argument – what kinds of evidence are presented in support;

[4] what methods of research has the author employed – how did they get their evidence?

Remember the literature review should not simply be a summary of various works. It must be a review in relation to the issues you are addressing and therefore you must try and clarify your own research questions.

Formulating Your Own Ideas

In the light of this reading and assessment, you need to situate your own questions and start to think about the substantive, theoretical, empirical and methodological issues raised by your own agenda. What do you want to say? What is it that you are trying to find out? What theoretical frameworks or ideas might be helpful in organising your work? What kinds of evidence would you need to help you answer your question(s) How might you seek to collect such evidence? You will need, in other words, to link the questions that interest you with sources of information.

Writing the Report

The order in which you work on your report is not the same as the order in which you present the results. Start with the critical review of the literature. This must try and characterise the existing debates in the ways suggested above and to highlight the problems, or unanswered questions, in the literature surveyed. In doing this you therefore show why there is the need for further research.

The statement of aims and objectives and intellectual justification for the research comes next. Having identified the gaps or limitations in the literature you will need to identify your own aims and objectives and then give your reasoning for so doing: the intellectual justification. This will be fairly general and indicate the nature of the contribution you would be trying to make to the understanding of the chosen topic.

With the general outline in place you can then proceed to formulating your own questions that you want to explore or address. Finally, and in the light of your aims and objectives and your specific research questions, you need to identify and give the reasons for the particular methods and sources that you will use and discuss how they might help in your research. 

Remember when writing your report:

  1. use headings for your sections and break up longer sentences with sub-headings;
  2. keep the focus clear
  • remind the reader what’s going on by giving conclusions to each section and a brief indication of what comes next, and why

The Abstract should be written after everything else is settled. The Abstract gives a brief summary of the research. It states the main aims and objectives, the argument advanced and the methods employed. The Abstract gives the reader a quick idea of whether it is worth reading any further.

Plagiarism

The University regards cheating and plagiarism and other instances of academic malpractice with the utmost seriousness.

Plagiarism is defined as presenting someone else’s work as your own. Work means any intellectual output, and typically includes text (including lecture notes and handouts) data, images, sound or performance, or any combination of these.

The significance of plagiarism is that assessments are only of any use if the work you submit is your own: to present the work of others is dishonest. You may use information that you gather from journals, books, the internet, websites, lectures or other teaching sessions, contact with others, etc., but it must always be properly attributed and all sources used must be referenced (including lecture notes and handouts). Failure to attribute material which is not your own will be regarded as plagiarism, for which the University imposes strict penalties. All cases of plagiarism and cheating in coursework are reported to the University.

REFERENCES IN YOUR WRITTEN WORK

You must clearly acknowledge sources, even when not directly quoting a sentence but using somebody else's ideas. After all, an intellectual debt is owed if ideas are borrowed. The best way of avoiding such risk is by care in taking notes and making sure that what is borrowed from someone else and what is original work is clearly indicated. Any doubt about the proper use of referencing should be discussed with your tutors. 

Obviously, how you reference depends on what you are doing. In an essay, or handout, you can - and should - make your references precise and specific. In an exam answer, on the other hand, it is more natural for references to take a more open form, such as: ‘In contrast to Markovits and Silverstein, who argue that corruption scandals have a cathartic effect on democratic legitimacy, Della Porta regards them as undermining the entire fabric of democracy and destroying public confidence in its institutions.’ What follows below is advice on accurate, precise and specific referencing and is particularly useful for essays and handouts.

Always make the formal reference to the particular source that you used, not to the original reference if that is different. You get no credit for cluttering your essay up with a dozen different references, if you got them all from the same secondary source.

References should be included in the text as follows: 'A recent book on welfare pluralism (Johnson, 1987) follows arguments for public welfare provision. It is based on Titmuss (1974).'

More than one publication for the same author in the same year: If you find you need to refer to more than one publication by an author in the same year the following convention applies: - (Johnson, 1987a; Johnson, 1987b; Johnson, 1987c). 

Reference to a particular chapter: eg (see Johnson, 1987, ch. 2).

Direct quotations should include the page number: 'What does seem beyond doubt is that the great structural inequalities of class, race and gender will endure, at least for the foreseeable future.' (Cashmore, 1989: 237).

Quoting from a secondary source: Sometimes you will wish to use a quotation found in a secondary source. For example, you might find a quote from Oakley in a book by Dex. It should be referenced in the following way: 'Cleaning a house is just like working in a factory - you dust the same thing every day and it is never appreciated' (Dex, 1985: 88, quoting Oakley, 1974: 51).

BIBLIOGRAPHY

When presenting your bibliography, you should make sure that the entries are presented in alphabetical order by author's surname. [Note that the highlighting referred to below can be by underlining, emboldening or italicising. The last is preferable, if possible]. This is how individual entries should appear:

Books

Name(s) of author(s) ~ Year of publication (in brackets) ~ Title of book, highlighted ~ Edition, if not the first ~

Number of volumes, if more than one ~ Place of publication ~ Name of publisher

e.g. Pascall, G. (1986), Social Policy: a Feminist Analysis. London, Tavistock

Articles/chapters within books

Name(s) of author(s) ~ Year of publication (in brackets) ~ Title of chapter/article in ~Author, or editor of book ~ Title of book, highlighted ~ Edition, if not the first ~ Volume Number, if multi-volumed work/series ~ Place of publication ~ Page numbers

e.g. Lomax, W. (1991) 'Hungary from Karism to democracy: the successful failure of reform Communism' in String, D. (ed.) The Impact of Gorbachev, London, Pinter.

Articles in periodicals

Name(s) of author(s) ~ (Date) ~ Title of article ~ Title of periodical, highlighted ~ Volume and part number ~ Page numbers

e.g. Page, R. (1987), 'Child Abuse: the smothering of an issue - a British perspective', Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 9.1 : 51-65

Official papers

Name of report/department* ~ (Date) ~ Title of document highlighted ~ Command number/volume number if applicable ~ Place of publication ~ Publisher 

* If the report is not known by name, it can be cited and referenced by its command number. Please note that there have been several series of these, with distinctive abbreviations. 

e.g. Beveridge Report, (1942), Social Insurance and Allied Services, Cmd 6404, London, HMSO; or Cm (1990) Broadcasting in the 90s: Competition, Choice and Quality, London, HMSO.

Internet source or web page

Name(s) of author(s) or of organisation publishing the document ~ (Date) ~ Title of document, either in quotes or highlighted ~ Internet web reference, as full as possible and date accessed.

e.g. The World Bank (April 1998) ‘Helping countries combat corruption: the role of the World Bank’, http://www.worldbank.org/html/extdr/corruptn/cor02.htm Accessed 7 September 2005

This list was last updated on 16/09/2019