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IDEA5250M
Module Reading List

Professional Issues 3: Consent and Contracts, 2019/20, Semester 2
Dr Thomas Hancocks
t.l.hancocks@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Unit 1: Introduction and Case Studies

Required reading:

Chang, H. (2002). Kicking away the ladder : development strategy in historical perspective. London: Anthem, pp. 1-12, and 139-141.

Further reading:

Hill, K. (2014). Facebook Manipulated 689,003 Users' Emotions For Science. Forbes.

Julian Sheather, ‘Should we pay drug addicts £200 to be sterilised’, British medical journal., 17th October 2010.

Dominic Wilkinson, ‘Embrace the controversy: let's offer Project Prevention on the NHS’, Practical Ethics: Ethics in the News University of Oxford, April 30th 2010.

Julian Savulescu, ‘Response to: Embrace the controversy: let's offer Project Prevention on the NHS’, Practical Ethics: Ethics in the News University of Oxford, May 3rd 2010.

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Required reading:

Simmons, A.J. (1976). Tacit Consent and Political Obligations. Philosophy & public affairs. 5(3): 274-291.
When you are reading this piece from Simmons please focus on his analysis of valid consent rather than the problem of political obligation. PLEASE NOTE: you only need to read up until the end of p. 288.

Weale, A. (1978). Consent. Political studies. 26(1): 65-77.
Again, please focus on Weale's account of consent rather than its application to the problem of political obligation. PLEASE NOTE: you do not need to read the final section (VI).

Further reading:

Hart, H.L.A. (1955). Are there any natural rights? Philosophical review. 64(2): 175-191.

Simmons, A.J. Moral principles and political obligations. Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 102-136 (end of section Viv).

Shiffrin, S. (2008). Promising, Intimate Relationships, and Conventionalism. Philosophical review. 117(4): 481-524.

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Unit 3: The Principle of Fairness

Required reading:

Simmons, A.J. Moral principles and political obligations. Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 102-136.
Available as an Online Course Reading

Further reading:

Arneson, R.J. (1982). The Principle of Fairness and Free-rider Problems. Ethics. 92(4): 616-633.

Cullity, G. (1995). Moral Free Riding. Philosophy & public affairs. 24(1): 3-34.

Hart, H.L.A. (1955). Are there any natural rights? Philosophical review 64(2): 175-191.

Nozick, R. (1998). Anarchy, state and utopia. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 90-95.
Available as an Online Course Reading

Rawls, J. (1999). Legal Obligation and the Duty of Fair Play. Collected papers, pp. 117-129. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

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Required reading:

Davis, J.K. (2008). How to justify enforcing a Ulysses contract when Ulysses is competent to refuse. Kennedy Institute of Ethics journal. 18(1): 87-106.

Dworkin, G. (1988). Is More Choice Better than Less? In The theory and practice of autonomy, Chapter 5. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Further reading:

Cronqvist, H. and Thaler, R. (2004). Design Choices in privatized social-security systems: Learning for the Swedish experience. American economic review. 94(2): 424-428.

Iyengar, S. and Kamenica, E. (2010). Choice Proliferation, Simplicity Seeking and Asset Allocation. Journal of Public Economics. 94(7-8): 530-539.

Iyengar, S. (2011). The art of choosing. London: Abacus. Especially pages 194-200 and Chapter 6.

Sunstein, C. (2015). Endless options can be exhausting. We need to know when choice matters. The Guardian.

Thaler, R. and Sunstein, C.R. (2008). Nudge : improving decisions about health, wealth, and happiness London: Yale University Press. Especially page 145.

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Required reading:

Feinberg, J., The moral limits of the criminal law, Harm to others (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984), p. 115-117.
Available as an Online Course Reading.

Feinberg, J. (1988). The moral limits of the criminal law. Harmless wrongdoing. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. xix-xx, 124-133, 173-175, 328-333.
Available as an Online Course Reading

Wikler, D. (1979). Paternalism and the Mildly Retarded. Philosophy & public affairs. 8(4): 377-392.

Further reading:

Owens, D. (2006). A Simple Theory of Promising. Philosophical review. 115(1): 51-77.

Raz, J. (1982): Review: Promises in Morality and Law. Harvard Law Review. 95(4): 916-938.

Scanlon, T.M. (1998). What We Owe to Each Other. London : Belknap.

Wertheimer, A. (2008). Exploitation. In Zalta, E.N. (ed.) Stanford encyclopedia of philosophy [electronic resource].

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Required reading:

Wertheimer, A. (2008). Exploitation. In Zalta, E.N. (ed.) Stanford encyclopedia of philosophy [electronic resource].

Further reading:

Chang, H-J. (2011). Harmless Wrongdoing. London: Penguin.    

Chang, H-J. (2013). Decent wages or a breadline economy: it's a no-brainer. The Guardian.

Chang, H-J. (2013). Company profits depend on the 'welfare payments' they get from society. The Guardian.

Coakley, M., Kates, M. (2013). The Ethical and Economic Case for Sweatshop Regulation. Journal of business ethics. 117(3): 553-558.

Davis, D.B. (2006). Inhuman bondage : the rise and fall of slavery in the New World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Feinberg, J. (1988). The moral limits of the criminal law. Harmless wrongdoing. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. xix-xx.
Available as an Online Course Reading

Lawlor, R. (2011). Organ sales needn't be exploitative (but it matters if they are) Bioethics. 25(5): 250-9.
(This is very heavily based on Wertheimer's account. It also has the benefit of discussing parts of Wertheimer's view (from the last chapter of his book Exploitation ) which are not discussed much in his Stanford Encyclopedia entry. This makes this paper useful for the exploitation essay question.)

Lawlor, R. (2012). Organ Sales: Exploitative at any price? Bioethics. 28(4): 194–202.

Liberto, H. (2013). Noxious Markets versus Noxious Gift Relationships. Social Theory and Practice 39(2): 265-287. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Mayer, R. (2007). What is wrong with exploitation? Journal of applied philosophy. 24(2): 137–150.
(I think some people find this a bit more accessible than Wertheimer's paper. I think the account of exploitation presented in it is quite similar though.)

Snyder, J. (2010). Exploitation and Sweatshop Labor: Perspectives and Issues. Business ethics quarterly 20(2): 187-213.

Snyder, J. (2008). Needs Exploitation. Ethical theory and moral practice. 11(4): 389-405.

Zwolinski, M. (2007). Sweatshops, Choice, and Exploitation. Business ethics quarterly 17(4): 689-727.

Zutlevics, T.L. (2001). Markets and The Needy: Organ Sales or Aid? Journal of applied philosophy. 18(3): 297–302.

Valdman, M. (2009). Theory of Wrongful Exploitation. Philosophers' imprint [electronic resource]. 9(6). [electronic resource]
(My own view of this paper is that it doesn't pay enough attention to Wertheimer's account of exploitation.)

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Required reading:

Sandel, M. (2013). What money can't buy: the moral limits of markets, Ch. 3, especially pages 114-122. London: Penguin Books.

Further reading:

Arrow, K.J. (1972). Gifts and Exchanges. Philosophy & public affairs. 1(4): 343-362.

Singer, P. (1973). Altruism and Commerce: A defence of Titmuss Against Arrow. Philosophy & public affairs. 2(3): 312-320.

Wilkinson, S. (2000). Commodification Arguments for the Legal Prohibition of Organ Sale. Health care analysis. 8(2): 189-201.

Roodhouse, M. (2007). Rationing returns: a solution to global warming? History and Policy. http://www.historyandpolicy.org/policy-papers/papers/rationing-returns-a-solution-to-global-warming

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Unit 8: License to operate

Required reading:

Dunfee, T.W. and Donaldson, T. (1999). Social Contract Approaches to Business Ethics: Bridging the Is-Ought Gap. In Frederick, R.E. (ed.) A companion to business ethics, pp. 38-55. Oxford: Blackwell.

Graafland, J.J. (2002). Profits and principles: four perspectives. Journal of business ethics. 35(4): 293-305.

Phillips, R.A. and Johnson-Cramer, M.E. (2006). Ties that Unwind: Dynamism in Integrative Social Contracts Theory. Journal of business ethics. 68(3): 283-302.

Further reading:

Buchholtz, R.A. and Rosenthal, S.B. (1999). Social Responsibility and Business Ethics. In Frederick, R.E. (ed.) A companion to business ethics, pp 317-318 ONLY. Oxford: Blackwell.

Boatright, J. (1999). Finance Ethics. In Frederick, R.E. (ed.) A companion to business ethics. Oxford: Blackwell.
(NB this article does not refer explicitly to a social contract theory or to a licence to operate, but some of the discussion in it might be conceived of in these terms)

Rayner, S. (2003). Democracy in the age of assessment: reflections on the roles of expertise and democracy in public-sector decision making. Science and public policy 3(1): 163-170.
This article only refers explicitly to the notion of a license to operate once, but is an interesting critical discussion of the idea of public participation as a sign of implicit consent/ provision of a license to operate for scientific inquiry. In other words it applies the idea to a sphere of professional activity outside that of business.

Airaksinen, T. (2012). Social Responsibility and Business Ethics. In Frederick, R.E. (ed.) Encyclopedia of applied ethics, vol. 3, esp. p. 677, section E. London: Academic Press.

Hampton, J. (1999). Contract and Consent. In Goodin, R.E. and Pettit, P. (eds.) A Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy, pp 379-393. Oxford: Blackwell.

Journal of business ethics 68(3), 2006.

You should also become accustomed to seeking out additional useful reading material from other sources. It is worthwhile to make a habit of looking at recent journals in the field of applied and professional ethics such as Journal of applied philosophy., Philosophy and Public Affairs, Res publica. and Ethics..

If you have difficulty finding helpful readings on a topic do seek advice from the module tutors.

This list was last updated on 04/11/2019