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PIED3202
3202 Module Reading List

Land, Fuel and Agriculture, 2019/20, Semester 1
Professor Ray Bush
R.Bush@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Selection of Key Readings I am not a fan of dictionaries but this is great, critical decolonial analyses and attempts to move away from Eurocentrism, and it’s a free download, check it out! https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334051449_Pluriverse_A_Post-Development_Dictionary_AUF_2019_NEW_BOOK_edited_by_Ashish_Kothari_Ariel_Salleh_Arturo_Escobar_Federico_Demaria_and_Alberto_Acosta_Download_full_ebook_for_free_PDF_License_Creative_Co

Special Issue of Journal of Peasant Studies vol42, 3-4, 2015 Land Grabbing
John Smith, (2016) Imperialism in the Twenty-First Century
Ben Selwyn (2017) The Struggle for Development
R Bush (2007) Poverty and Neoliberalism
H Ayeb and R Bush (2019) Food Insecurity and Revolution .
H Akram-Lodhi and C Kay eds, (2009) Peasants and Globalisation
J Ferguson (2006) Global Shadows: Africa in the neoliberal world order
John-Andrew McNeish and Owen Logan eds,(2012) Flammable Societies
M Mowforth (2014) The Violence of Development
Fabiana Li (2015) Unearthing Conflict
H Veltmeyer and James Petras eds., (2014) The New Extractivism
Terry Lynn Karl (1997) The Paradox of Plenty: Oil Booms and Petro-States and her ‘The Perils of the Petro-State: Reflections on the Paradox of Plenty, Journal of International Affairs, Fall 1999, 53, 1
Bonnie Campbell ed (2009) Mining in Africa
______________ ed (2013) Modes of Governance and Revenue Flows in African Mining
Rosemary Thorp et al (2012) The Developmental Challenges of Mining and Oil
A Bebbington and J Bury eds (2013) Subterranean Struggles, new dynamics of mining, oil and gas in Latin America
Haroon Akram-Lodhi and C Kay (2010) eds Peasants and Globalization
Tony Weis (2007) The Global Food Economy
Ben Selwyn (2016) ‘Global Value Chains and World Development: a class relational framework’ Third World Quarterly, 37,10, 1768-1786
Ben Selwyn (2017) The Struggle for Development
Henry Bernstein (2010) Class Dynamics of Agrarian Change
J van Der Ploeg (2013) Peasants and the Art of Farming
Philip McMichael (2013) Food Regimes and Agrarian Questions
Jason Moore (2015) Capitalism in the Web of Life
Rami Zurayk, Eckart Woertz and Rachel Bahn, eds., (2018) Crisis and Conflict in Agriculture
Raj Patel and Jason Moore (2017) A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things
Campling, Liam et al. 2016. ‘Class Dynamics of Development: a methodological note’. Third World Quarterly, 37, 10, 1745-1767
Global Witness, www.GlobalWitness.org
Bank Information Centre, http://www.bicusa.org/
World Development Movement mining and food, http://www.wdm.org.uk/
Mining Watch Canada
http://www.sharing.org/information-centre/reports
Look at recent issues of the annual, The Mine, published by PricewaterhouseCoopers for the views from the companies and the World Bank extractive industries pages http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/extractiveindustries

Oxfam https://www.culturalsurvival.org/latest

Selection of journals to explore further themes for your research report
The Extractives Industries and Society
Capital and Class
Globalizations
Historical Materialism
Human Geography
Latin American Perspectives
Journal of Contemporary Asia
Review of African Political Economy
New Left Review
Monthly Review
New Political Economy
Review of International Political Economy
Resources Policy
Journal of Peasant Studies
Journal of Agrarian Change



Lecture and Seminar Plan and Readings

Week One Beginning 30/09/19
Lecture 1. Post World War 2: Development and Underdevelopment

This lecture examines the character of post war reconstruction focusing on the shifts between optimism for growth and development in the global south, increasing global inequality and the role that resources play in that. By doing so it provides a context for understanding the module as a whole and it impresses the importance of historical processes in helping explain contemporary underdevelopment.

Essential Reading:

EVERYONE, Read,
Anna Lappé (2019) ‘Follow the money to the Amazon’, https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/09/follow-money-amazon/597319/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=share
4 Sept.
Then, dip into…
Philip McMichael (2016) [but also previous editions] Development and Social Change [framing chapter or one on globalisation]
A Bebbington and J Bury ‘Political Ecologies of the Subsoil’ ch1 in A Bebbington and J Bury eds (2013) Subterranean Struggles, new dynamics of mining, oil and gas in Latin America
Marco Boffo, Alfredo Saad-Filho and Ben Fine (2018) Neoliberal capitalism: The authoritarian turn. In Leo Panitch and Greg Albo eds., A World Turned Upside Down? Socialist Register 2019
Alfredo Saad-Filho (2007) Neo liberalism and the Left, A Symposium in L Panitch and Colin Leys eds, Global Flashpoints, Socialist Register 2008
Ben Fine and Alfredo Saad-Filho (2017) ‘Thirteen Things You need to Know about Neo-Liberalism’, Critical Sociology 43, (4-5) 685-706
Raj Patel and Jason Moore (2017) A History of the World in seven Cheap Things
M T Huber (2008) From Lifeblood to Addiction: Oil, Space, and the Wage-Relation in Petro-Capitalist USA’ Human Geography 1
T Piketty (2014) Capital
Naomi Klein (2014) This Changes Everything chapter 5
Branko Milanovic (2003) ‘The Two Faces of Globalisation: Against Globalisation as we know it’ World Development 31 (4) 667-83
Wallerstein, Immanuel. “Braudel on Capitalism, or Everything Upside Down.” The Journal of Modern History 63, no. 2 (June 1, 1991): 354–61. https://doi.org/10.2307/2938489
Chang, Ha-Joon & Ilene Grabel (2004) Reclaiming Development look at ‘myth 2’ neoliberalism works
Chang (2002) Development Strategy in Historical Perspective
David Miller ‘How neoliberalism got where it is: Elite planning, Corporate Lobbying and the Release of the Free Market’ in K Birch and V Mykhnenko eds (2010) The Rise and Fall of Neo-Liberalism
Cory Blad, S. Olovuntoba and J. Shefner (2017) ‘Course /Corrections and failed rationales’ Third World Quarterly 38,4.
EA Brett (2009) Reconstructing Development Theory ch 2 and 10
R Bush (2018) ‘Africa: A Political Economy of Continued Crisis’ Afrika Focus vol31, nr2, 2018, 23-46
Alfredo Saad Filho and D Johnston eds (2005) Neo-Liberalism
3 short essays problematizing debt by Fridell, Gillespie and also Beeton, in Third World Quarterly vol34, no.8, 2013 pp1492-1504
Szeftel, M. (1987) 'The Crisis in the Third World.' In: Bush, R., Johnston, G. and Coates, D. (ed.) The World Order: Socialist Perspectives. pp.87-140.
Peter Lawrence (2010) ‘The African Tragedy. International and national roots’ in V Padayachee ed. The Political Economy of Africa
World Bank http://www.worldbank.org/financialcrisis/



Seminar: Outline of the Course and allocation of reading groups


Week Two Beginning 7/10/19

Lecture 2. Extractives and Development: the view from the World Bank and IFI’s

This lecture examines the way in which investment in mineral led growth has repeatedly been offered as a panacea for economic development in the Third World. It explores the notion of a ‘resource curse’, namely that there is an inverse relationship between mineral led development and economic growth and it explores the recommendations made by the IFIs to prevent a ‘curse’.

Essential Reading: Michael L Ross ‘The Political Economy of The Resource Curse’ in World Politics 51 Jan 1999, 297-322
Terry Lynn Karl (1997) The Paradox of Plenty: Oil Booms and Petro-States and her ‘The Perils of the Petro-State: Reflections on the Paradox of Plenty, Journal of International Affairs, Fall 1999, 53, 1
World Bank (2015) Extractives Review 2015 https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/2eaabb804ae4b8799548bdbfe70b6aa3/WBG+in+Extractive+Industries+-+2015+Annual+Review+.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

World Bank. (2009) Extractive Industries Value Chain http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTOGMC/Resources/ei_for_development_3.pdf

World Bank http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/extractiveindustries/overview

http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/extractiveindustries

K McPhail ‘How Oil, Gas and Mining Projects Can Contribute to Development’ in Finance and Development Dec 2000
Africa Mining Vision, http://www.africaminingvision.org/
A Rosser, (2006) The Political Economy of the Resource Curse, IDS Working Paper 268 available at, http://r4d.dfid.gov.uk/PDF/Outputs/futurestate/wp268.pdf
World Bank Oil and Gas and Mining Unit
http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTOGMC/0,,menuPK:336936~pagePK:149018~piPK:149093~theSitePK:336930,00.html

Reading for general use in first half of the module.
Campling, Liam et al. 2016. ‘Class Dynamics of Development: a methodological note’. Third World Quarterly, 37, 10, 1745-1767
Anthony Bebbington et al (2008) ‘Contention and Ambiguity: Mining and the Possibilities of Development’, Development and Change 39,6,887-914
G Bridge (2004) ‘Contested Terrain: Mining and the environment’ Annual Review of Environment and Resources 29,
Pegg, Scott, (2003) Poverty reduction or poverty exacerbation? World Bank Group support for extractive industries in Africa. A Report sponsored by Oxfam America, Friends of the Earth-US, Environmental Defense, Catholic Relief Services and the Bank Information Center. Oxfam America, Boston
Owen Logan and John-Andrew McNeish ‘Rethinking Responsibility in Resource Extraction’ ch 1 in John-Andrew McNeish and Owen Logan eds,(2012) Flammable Societies
Graham A Davis & JE Tilton (2005) ‘The Resource Curse’ Natural Resources Forum 29 233-242
World Bank on EITI, http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTOGMC/EXTEXTINDTRAINI/0,,menuPK:3634777~pagePK:64168427~piPK:64168435~theSitePK:3634715,00.html
Salim, Emil (Ed.), 2003. The World Bank Group and Extractive Industries. Vol. 1 of Striking a Better Balance: Final Report of the Extractive Industries Review, prepared by Emil Salim with the assistance of others for the World Bank. Available at www.eireview.org,
For the review also see, http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTOGMC/0,,contentMDK:20605112~menuPK:592071~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:336930,00.html
International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM) (2006) Resource Endowment Initiative: Synthesis of Four Country Case Studies
______________(2007)The Challenge of Mineral Wealth. Using Resource Endowments to Foster Sustainable Development. Peru Case Study
And for critiques see
http://www.africafocus.org/docs04/eir0409.php
and
Bonnie Campbell ed (2009) Mining in Africa
______________ed (2013) Modes of Governance and Revenue Flows in African Mining Introduction; chapter 1 by Jacobs and Conclusion.
Tim Mitchell (2009) ‘Carbon Democracy’ Economy and Society 38, 399-432 or his Chapter 1 in Carbon Democracy (2011)

Seminar: The promise of resource growth and the policy environment

Questions:

1. What do you understand by what has been called a resource curse?
2. What strategies have the World Bank promoted to reduce the consequences of what it calls a resource curse? - Codes of Conduct; EITI
3. What strategies have the World Bank promoted to reduce the consequences of what it calls a resource curse? – Governance; CSR

Reading Q1:
Michael L Ross ‘The Political Economy of The Resource Curse’ in World Politics 51 Jan 1999, 297-322
A Rosser, (2006) The Political Economy of the Resource Curse, IDS Working Paper 268 available at, http://r4d.dfid.gov.uk/PDF/Outputs/futurestate/wp268.pdf
Paul Stevens (2015) The Resource Curse https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/field/field_document/20150804ResourceCurseRevisitedStevensLahnKooroshyAppendix.pdf

And Stevens et al (2015)The Resource Curse revisited
https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/field/field_document/20150804ResourceCurseRevisitedStevensLahnKooroshy_0.pdf
A Bebbington and J Bury ‘Political Ecologies of the Subsoil’ ch1 in A Bebbington and J Bury eds (2013) Subterranean Struggles, new dynamics of mining, oil and gas in Latin America
Paul Collier (2007)The Bottom Billion and review by Peter Lawrence (2010) ‘Development by Numbers’ New Left Review 62, March-April 143-153
Graham A Davis & JE Tilton (2005) ‘The Resource Curse’ Natural Resources Forum 29 233-242
John Childs and Julie Hearn (2017) ‘‘New’ nations? Resource based development imaginaries’ Third World Quarterly 38,4,844-861

Reading Q2:
Bonnie Campbell ed (2009) Mining in Africa
http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTOGMC/0,,contentMDK:20605112~menuPK:592071~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:336930,00.html

http://eiti.org/eiti

www.publishwhatyoupay.org

Special Issue, Third World Quarterly New Mechanism of participation in Extractive Governance, vol 38, 5, 2017 (good overview of Free, Prior and informed consent, and a number of case studies) see also for Question 3. And https://www.culturalsurvival.org/latest
J Owen and D Kemp (2014) ‘Free, Prior and Informed Consent, social complexity in the mining Industry’ in Resources Policy, 41, 91-100
S Mahanty and C McDermott (2013) ‘ How does free, prior and informed consent impact social equity’ Land Use Policy 35, Nov 404-416


Reading Q3:
http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/MENAEXT/EXTMNAREGTOPGOVERNANCE/0,,contentMDK:20513159~pagePK:34004173~piPK:34003707~theSitePK:497024,00.html
Graham Harrison (2010) Neoliberal Africa
________________(2004) The World Bank and Africa: The Construction of Governance States
Hilson Abigail, Hilson Gavin, Dauda Suleman (2019) Corporate Social Responsibility at African mines: Linking the past to the present, Journal of Environmental Management 241 pp. 340-352

Bonnie Campbell ed (2013) Modes of Governance and Revenue Flows in African Mining Introduction; chapter 1 by Jacobs and Conclusion.
J Ovadia (2011), ‘The Role of Local Content policies in the natural resource based development’ http://www.oefse.at/fileadmin/content/Downloads/Publikationen/Oepol/Artikel2015/Teil1_03_Ovadia.pdf


Week Three Beginning 14/10/19
Lecture 3. Extractives and Development the views from the Global South: regulation and resource nationalism?

This lecture explores strategies adopted in the global south to harness resources and promote resource led growth. It also examines some of the obstacles to delivering resource led growth.

Essential; Introduction to Thorp et al The Development Challenges of Mining and Oil
Lee Wengraf (2018). Extracting Profit. Imperialism, Neoliberalism and the New Scramble for Africa
https://developingeconomics.org/2019/05/31/rethinking-the-failures-of-mining-industrialisation-in-the-african-periphery/

Special Issue of Extractive Industries and Society vol4 4, Nov 2017, intro by Miles Larmer and Vito Laterza. ‘Contested Wealth: Social and Political Mobilisation in extractive communities in Africa’ and then look at the different case studies.
A good introduction to the structural limits is Ben Fine in Review of African Political Economy 45,156, June 2018 pp292-299
Jesse Salah Ovadia (2017) Local Content in Tanzania’s Gas and Minerals Sector Who regulates
https://www.cmi.no/publications/file/6314-local-content-in-tanzanias-gas-and-minerals.pdf

Richard M Auty (2002) ‘The ‘resource curse’ in developing countries’ in V Desai and R B Potter eds (2002) The Companion to Development Studies
R Broad and J Cavanagh (2013) ‘Gold For Export?..or Water & Food for Life? The Case of Gold Mining in El Salvador’, paper to Yale University Conference, http://www.yale.edu/agrarianstudies/foodsovereignty/pprs/11_Broad%20_Cavanagh_2013.pdf

Liisa North and Ricardo Grinspun, (2016) ‘Neo Extractivism and the New Latin American developmentalism: the missing piece of rural transformation’, Third World Quarterly, 37,8,1483-1504
Vergara-Camus, Leandro and Cristóbel Kay. (2017a) ‘Agribusiness, peasants, left wing governments, and the state in Latin America: An overview and theoretical reflection’. In Journal of Agrarian Change vol 17. 239-257
Vergara-Camus, Leandro and Cristóbel Kay. (2017b) ‘The agrarian political economy of left wing governments in Latin America: Agribusiness, Peasants, and the limits of neo-developmentalism’, in Journal of Agrarian Change, vol 17. 415-437
A Acosta (2013) Extractivism and neo extractivism: Two sides of the same curse, in M Lang and D Mokrain eds., Beyond Development: an alternative vision from Latin America


You could develop a case study of platinum, see special issue of Review of African Political Economy , 146, 2015 ‘White Gold, new class and community struggles on the South African platinum belt’ edited by Gavin Capps, Dunbar Moodie and Ray Bush

Ray Bush (2010) ‘Conclusion: Mining, Dispossession and Transformation in Africa’ in A Fraser and M Larmer eds Boom and Bust on the Zambian Copper Belt
Look at the Africa mining vision web site and the proposals for dealing with mining and development http://www.africaminingvision.org/ bookmark this site as it’s important to return to.
African Union (2015) http://www.un.org/en/africa/osaa/pdf/events/20150224/busia.pdf
Look at the debate about free, prior and informed consent inter alia
https://www.culturalsurvival.org/latest
J.Owen and D Kemp (2014) Free Prior and Informed Consent, social complexity in the mining industry’, in Resources Policy, 41, 91-100
S Mahanty and Constance McDermott (2013), ‘How Does ‘Free, Prior and Informed Consent impact social equity. Lessons from mining and forestry and their implications for REDD’, Land Use Policy 35, Nov, 404-416
Thabit Jacob and R Petersen (2018) ‘New Resource Nationalism? Continuity and Change in Tanzania’s Extractive industries’ in Extractive Industries and Society 5, 2, April


A lot of the material on FRIC is related to indigenous peoples, a good opportunity to develop a case study.


Seminar: Resource nationalism and regulation

Questions

1. What are the main consequences of mineral led growth for developing countries?
2. Is there a contrast between the way the countries in Latin America and Africa have dealt with extractives?
3. What were the consequences of boom and bust on the Zambian copper belt?

Reading Q1:
You can usefully choose any case study in the Bebbington and Bury collection.
M Mowforth (2014) The Violence of Development
J Petras and H Veltmeyer (2018) ‘Class Struggle Back on the Agenda in Latin America’, Journal of Developing Societies, 34,1.
M Himley (2012) ‘Regularizing Extraction in Andean Peru: Mining and Social Mobilization in an Age of Corporate Social Responsibility’ Antipode 45, 2
I De Soysa (2000) ‘The Resource Curse: Are Civil Wars Driven by Rapacity or Paucity?’ in M. Berdal and D. Malone eds, Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars
Richard M. Auty (1993) Sustaining development in the Mineral Economies: The Resource Curse Thesis
David Keen (2012) Useful Enemies chps 1 & 2
One of Richard M Auty (2002) ‘The ‘resource curse’ in developing countries’ in V Desai and R B Potter eds (2002) The Companion to Development Studies
Richard M Auty (1997) Natural Resource Endowment: The State and Development Strategy’ in Journal of International Development, 9, (4) 651-663
Pierre Ambramovici (2004) ‘Precious Resources in Need of Protection: US and the New Scramble for Africa’ Le Monde Diplomatique (English version) July

Reading on Q2:

Look at the Africa mining vision web site and the proposals for dealing with mining and development http://www.africaminingvision.org/

Ben Radley (2019)Rethinking the Failures of Mining industrialisation https://developingeconomics.org/2019/05/31/rethinking-the-failures-of-mining-industrialisation-in-the-african-periphery/

Eddy Akpomera (2015), ‘International crude oil theft: elite predatory tendencies in Nigeria’, Review of African Political Economy 42, 143
M Watts and Ed Kashi (2008) Curse of the Black Gold: Fifty Years of Oil in the Niger Delta
Cyril Obi and Siri Aas Rustad eds (2001) Oil and Insurgency in the Niger Delta esp ch 1 & 3
Jonathan Di John (2007) ‘Oil abundance and violent political conflict: A critical assessment’, Journal of Development Studies, 43,6,2007
Cyril Obi (2010) ‘Oil Extraction, Dispossession and Conflict in Nigeria’s Oil Rich Niger Delta’, Canadian Journal of Development Studies vol 30, 1-2
Yvan Guichaoua (2013) ‘Elites’ Survival and natural Resources Exploitation in Nigeria and Niger’ ch 6 in Thorpe et al opcit
Cyril Obi (2013) ‘Oil as the ‘Curse’ of Conflict in Africa: Peering through the Smoke & Mirrows’ in R Abrahamsen ed Conflict & Security in Africa
Michael Watts (2007) ‘Petro Insurgency or Criminal Syndicate? Conflict & Violence in the Niger Delta, Review of African Political Economy 114 vol 34 637-660 reproduced in R Abrahamsen (2013) ed Conflict & Security in Africa

For Chile and Peru see chapters in Thorp et al eds.
H Veltmeyer and James Petras (2014) The New Extractivism [check out the different case studies in LA]


Reading Q3:
A Fraser (2010) ‘Introduction: Boom and Bust on the Zambian Copperbelt’ in A Fraser and M Larmer eds Zambia, Mining and Neoliberalism
M Larmer (2010) ‘Historical Perspectives on Zambia’s Mining Booms and Busts’ in ibid.
Richard Saunders and A Caramento (2017) ‘An extractive development state in Southern Africa? The cases of Zambia and Zimbabwe’, Third World Quarterly December.
James Ferguson (1999) Expectations of modernity: Myths and Meanings of Urban Life on the Zambian Copperbelt
John Craig (2000) ‘Evaluating Privatisation in Zambia: A Tale of Two Processes’ in Review of African Political Economy27, no. 85
Southern African Resource Watch http://old.sarwatch.org/publications/resource-insight.html
A Fraser and J Lungu, (2007) For whom the windfalls? Winners and Losers in the Privatisation of Zambia’s Copper Mines
E Gilberthorpe et al (2016) Sustainable Mining? Corporate Social Responsibility, Migration and Livelihood Choices in Zambia’, Journal of Development Studies 52, issue 11

For further reading, recap on the rentier state;
H Mahdavy ‘The rentier state, the case of Iran’ in M A Cook (ed) Studies in the Economic History Michael Watts (2007) ‘Petro Insurgency or Criminal Syndicate? Conflict & Violence in the Niger Delta, Review of African Political Economy 114 vol 34 637-660
Douglas A Yates (1996) The Rentier State in Africa: Oil Rent Dependency& Neocolonialism in the Republic of Gabon [a chapter from this book is on the web, http://students.washington.edu/hattar/yates.pdf]
Geoffrey Wood (2004) ‘Business and Politics in a Criminal State: The Case of Equatorial Guinea’, African Affairs 103, 413, pp547-567


Week Four Beginning 21/10/19
Lecture 4: Artisanal Small Scale Mining: struggles in the enclave and contesting the market?

There are more than 5 million small scale miners across the world. This lecture looks at what they do and how policy makers relate to them, what challenges they present and what benefits they bring to the communities around where they work.

Essential: Anthony Bebbington et al (2008) ‘Contention and Ambiguity: Mining and the Possibilities of Development’, Development and Change 39, 6, 887-914
Ray Bush (2010) ‘Conclusion: Mining, Dispossession and Transformation in Africa’ in A Fraser and M Larmer eds (2010) Boom and Bust on the Zambian Copper Belt
G Hilson and J McQuilken (2014) ‘Four decades of support for artisanal and small scale mining in Sub Saharan Africa: A critical review The Extractive Industries and Society 1


Seminar: PLEASE NOTE THIS SEMINAR IS ON THURSDAY 31 Raw Materials: Mineral Led Growth – the political economy of the resource curse and Artisanal small scale mining

Questions
1. What do you understand by the mining enclave and what are its main features?
2. How do you explain the presence of artisanal miners? And what challenges do they pose policy makers and large mines?
3. In what ways does ASM contribute to and transform communities?

Reading Q1:
Ben Radley (2019) Rethinking the Failures of Mining industrialisation https://developingeconomics.org/2019/05/31/rethinking-the-failures-of-mining-industrialisation-in-the-african-periphery/
Ray Bush (2010) ‘Conclusion: Mining, Dispossession and Transformation in Africa’ in A Fraser and M Larmer eds Boom and Bust on the Zambian Copper Belt
Patrick Bond (2006) ‘Primitive Accumulation, Enclavity, Rural Marginalisation and Articulation’ in Review of African Political Economy, 34, 111, pp1-9
R Thorp et al (2012) The Developmental Challenges of Mining and Oil. Lessons from Africa and Latin America
Anthony Bebbington et al (2008) ‘Contention and Ambiguity: Mining and the Possibilities of Development’, Development and Change 39, 6, 887-914
Pegg, Scott, 2003. Poverty reduction or poverty exacerbation? World Bank Group support for extractive industries in Africa. A Report sponsored by Oxfam America, Friends of the Earth-US, Environmental Defense, Catholic Relief Services and the Bank Information Center. Oxfam America
R Auty (2000) ‘How Natural Resources Affect Economic Development’ Development Policy Review 18, 347-364
J Ferguson (2006) Global Shadows: Africa in the neoliberal world order, ch8
J Bury (2005) ‘Mining Mountains, neoliberalism, land tenure, livelihoods and the new Peruvian mining industry in Cajamarca, Environment and Planning A 37,221-239
Gavin Hilson ed (2010) Enclaves of Wealth and Hinterlands of Discontent   


Reading Q2:
Hilson, Gavin, Goumandakoye, Halima and Diallo, Penda (2019) Formalizing Artisanal Mining ‘Spaces’ in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Niger Land Use Policy, 80. pp. 259-268.
Hilson, G., Potter, C. (2005) Structural adjustment and subsistence industry: artisanal gold mining in Ghana. Development and Change 36(1): 103-131.
Sadia Mohemmad Banchirigah, (2008) ‘Challenges with eradicating illegal mining in Ghana. A perspective from the grassroots’ Resources Policy 33, 1, March 29-31
N Yakovleva (2007) ‘Perspectives on Female participation in artisanal small scale mining: case of Birim Ghana Resources Policy 32 1-2 29-41
Knud Sinding (2005) ‘The Dynamics of Artisanal small scale mining reform’ in Natural Resources Forum 29, 243-52
R Maconachie and G Hilson (2011) ‘Artisanal gold mining: A new frontier in post-conflict Sierra Leone? The Journal of Development Studies 47 4, pp595-616
G Hilson (2011) ‘ A conflict of Interest? A critical examination of Artisanal/Large Scale miner relations in Sub-Saharan Africa, in F Botchway ed., New Directions in Resource Investment and African Development  


Gavin Hilson and Godfried Okoh (2013) ‘Artisanal Mining in Ghana: Institutional Arrangements, Resource Flows and Poverty Alleviation’ in Bonnie Campbell ed Modes of Governance.
P Tschakert (2009) ‘Digging development for justice’ Antipode 41, 4

Reading Q3:
Hilson Gavin, Hilson Abigail, Siwale Agatha, Maconachie Roy (2018) Female faces in informal spaces: Women and artisanal and small-scale mining in sub-Saharan Africa, Africa Journal of Management 4 (3) pp. 306-346
Ray Bush,(2009) ‘Soon there will be no-one left to take the corpses to the morgue’: Accumulation and abjection in Ghana's mining communities’, Journal of Resource Policy, January
Ciaran O’Faircheallaigh and Tony Corbett (2016) ‘Understanding and improving policy and regulatory responses to artisanal and small scale mining’ in The Extractives Industries and Society, vol 5, issue 4, November
T Zvarivadza (2018), ‘Artisanal and Small Scale Miners as a challenge and possible contributor to Sustainable Development’ in Resources Policy 56 June
Hentschel, T., Nruschka, F., Priester, F. (2002) Global Report on Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining. Working Paper 70, Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development (MMSD) Project. London: International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).  


Hilson, G. 2008. ‘A Load too Heavy’: A Critical Examination of the Child Labor Problem in African Artisanal Mining Communities Children and Youth Services Review 30: 1233-1245.
Hilson, G. 2006. Abatement of mercury pollution in the small-scale gold mining industry: Restructuring the policy and research agendas. The Science of the Total Environment 362(1-3): 1-14.
Hilson, G. 2010. ‘Child Labour in African Artisanal Mining Communities: Experiences from Northern Ghana’ in Development and Change 41, 3, 445-473



Week Five Beginning 28/10/19
Lecture 5. Debating transitions to capitalism: Agrarian Questions and Accumulation by Dispossession

This lecture explores what is meant by Agrarian Questions involved in the transition to capitalism in the global south, to what extent is peasantry a useful concept for understanding some of the actors in the uneven transformation of agriculture?

Essential
Haroon Akram-Lodhi and C Kay (2010) ‘The Agrarian Question, Peasants and rural change’ in Akram-Lodhi and C Kay eds., Peasants and Globalization, in the same volume, see articles by Farshad Araghi ‘The invisible hand…’ and M Watts, The Southern Question..’ and P McMichael ‘Food sovereignty…
Dzodzi Tsikata (2016) ‘Gender, land tenure and sub Saharan Africa’ in Agrarian South vol5,1,1-19

Then contrast;
Samir Amin (2017) ‘The Agrarian Question a century after October 1917. Capitalist Agriculture and Agricultures in Capitalism’ Agrarian South: Journal of Political Economy vol6, 2, August, 149-176
Yeros, P, Jha, P and Moyo, S, (2013) ‘The Classical Agrarian Question : Reality and Relevance Today’ in Agrarian South. Journal of Political Economy 2, 93
With,
Bernstein, H.(2010) Class Dynamics of Agrarian Change. Or his (2007) ‘Is there an Agrarian Question in the 21st century?’, Canadian Journal of Development Studies, 27, 4, 449-460

Moore, J. (2010) ‘The End of the Road? Agricultural Revolutions in the Capitalist World-Ecology, 1450-2010, Journal of Agrarian Change vol10, 3
Haroon Akram-Lodhi and Cristóbel Kay (2010) ‘Surveying the Agrarian question (part 1): unearthing foundations, exploring diversity’ [and part 2 in vol 37 number 2
Akram-Lodhi and C Kay (2009) Introduction
David Harvey (2003) ‘The ‘New ‘Imperialism: Accumulation by Dispossession’ in Leo Panitch and Colin Leys eds The New Imperial Challenge, Socialist Register 2004
van der Ploeg, J. D. 2013, 'Peasant-driven agricultural growth and food sovereignty', paper presented at Yale
http://www.tni.org/briefing/peasant-driven-agricultural-growth-and-food-sovereignty?context=69566 and chapter 1 in his Peasants and the Art of Farming
Jun Borras (2009), ‘Agrarian change and peasant studies: changes, continuities and challenges – an introduction’, Journal of Peasant Studies 36, 1, January pp5-31; and his Inaugural lecture 14 April 2016, Land Politics, agrarian movements and scholar-activism, International Institute of Social Studies, https://www.tni.org/files/publication-downloads/borras_inaugural_lecture_14_april_2016_final_formatted_pdf_for_printing.pdf

Linking agrarian questions to mining see Tom Perreault (2013) ‘Dispossession by Accumulation? Mining, Water and the Nature of Enclosure on the Bolivian Altiplano’ Antipode 45,5

Seminar: PLEASE NOTE THIS SEMINAR IS ON FRIDAY 1 NOVEMBER Agrarian Questions: Debating transitions to capitalism

Questions:
1. What do you understand by Agrarian Questions?
2. What does accumulation by dispossession mean? Can you give examples?
3. Has the age of redistributive land reform ended?

Reading on Q1:
Rachel Bahn and Rami Zurayk, (2018) Agriculture, Conflict and the Agrarian Question in the 21st Century, in Rami Zurayk, Eckart Woertz and Rachel Bahn eds., Crisis and Conflict in Agriculture
JD Van der Ploeg, (2008) The New Peasantries and his (2013), 'Peasant-driven agricultural growth and food sovereignty', paper presented at Yale conference
http://www.tni.org/briefing/peasant-driven-agricultural-growth-and-food-sovereignty?context=69566
Samir Amin (2017) ‘The Agrarian Question a century after October 1917. Capitalist Agriculture and Agricultures in Capitalism’ Agrarian South: Journal of Political Economy vol6, 2, August, 149-176
Henry Bernstein (2004) ‘Considering Africa’s Agrarian Questions’ Historical Materialism 12,4,115-144
H Bernstein (2010) Class Dynamics of Agrarian Change intro and chapter 2
_________(1996) ‘Agrarian Questions Then and Now’, Journal of Peasant Studies, vol24, number 1 and 2 Special Issue pp22-59
________(2006) ‘Is there an Agrarian Question in the 21st Century? Canadian Journal of Development Studies
Habib Ayeb and Ray Bush (2019) Food Insecurity and Revolution in the Middle Eastt: Agrarian Questions in Egypt and Tunisia

Reading on Q2:

David Harvey (2003) ‘The ‘New ‘Imperialism: Accumulation by Dispossession’ in Leo Panitch and Colin Leys eds The New Imperial Challenge, Socialist Register 2004
__________(2005) The New Imperialism
P Bond (2006) Looting Africa
Tom Perreault (2013) ‘Dispossession by Accumulation? Mining, Water and the Nature of Enclosure on the Bolivian Altiplano’ Antipode 45,5
World Bank (2007) Agriculture for Development, World Development Report 2008. Washington DC, World Bank.
_________(2010) ‘Principles for Responsible Agricultural Investment that Respects Rights, Livelihoods and Resources’ A discussion note prepared by FAO, IFAD, UNCTAD and the World Bank Group to contribute to an ongoing global dialogue. January 25, http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTARD/214574-1111138388661/22453321/Principles_Extended.pdf
Special Issue of Journal of Agrarian Change, ‘The Agrarian Roots of Violent Conflict, vol11, no3 July 2011
Stefan Andreasson (2006) ‘Stand and Deliver: Private Property and the Politics of Global Dispossession’ Political Studies, 54, 3-2
Hannah Cross (2013) ‘Labour and underdevelopment? Migration, dispossession and accumulation in West Africa and Europe’ Review of African Political Economy 40,136

Reading on Q3:
A Haroon Akram-Lodhi, et al eds (2007) Land, Poverty and Livelihoods in an Era of Globalization
Ruth Hall, Ian Scoones and Dzodzi Tsikata (2017) ‘Plantations, outgrowers and commercial farming in Africa: Agricultural commercialisation and implications for agrarian change’ Journal of Peasant Studies, 44,3 pp515-537
Ray Bush (2018) ‘The Arab Spring’ in North Africa: Egypt and Tunisia, in Zurayk et al eds
Krishna Ghimire (2001) ed. Land Reform and Peasant Livelihoods: The Social Dynamics of Rural Poverty and Agrarian Reforms in Developing Countries
Moore Bruce. H (2001) ‘Empowering the Rural Poor Through Land Reform and Improved Access to Productive Assets’, in Ghimire, Krishna B. (2001) ed. Whose Land? Civil Society Perspectives on Land Reform and Rural Africa, Asia and Latin America. Geneva: UNRISD
Ray Bush (2002) ‘Land Reform and Counter Revolution’ in Ray Bush ed Counter Revolution in Egypt’s Countryside: Land and Farmers in an Era of Economic Reform
Saturnino M. Borras Jr., Cristobal Kay and Edward Lahiff eds (2008) Market- Led Agrarian Reform or original collection in Third World Quarterly 2007, vol28, 8
Keith Griffin et al ‘Poverty and the Distribution of Land in Journal of Agrarian Change, vol 2, 3, pp279-330



Week Six Beginning 4/10/19

No Lecture or Seminar. Assignment week but also note book launch Food Insecurity and Revolution in the Middle East and North Africa: Agrarian Questions in Egypt and Tunisia with authors Habib Ayeb and Ray Bush, POLIS seminar room 7 November 1600-1730. Also guest speakers and films introduced by film maker Habib Ayeb, Cous Cous and Landless Moroccans by film maker Soraya El Kahlaoui – location/time of films tbc.

Develop an annotated bibliography in preparation for the development of your research report. Use a range of resources. Identify which sources you will use in the different sections of your research report and locate these refs in the context of questions you want to explore. Submit a minimum 4 page annotated bibliography in your class in week 7 and include a list of 4 questions that you would like your research report to address. These questions will relate to among other things, what you see to be the gaps or shortcomings in the literature reviewed in your annotated bibliography.


Week Seven Beginning 11/11/19
Lecture: Food Security: World Food systems and their global dynamics

Food security is a term that it is difficult to disagree with but what does it mean and how has it been used to help shape the ways in which food is debated in the global south and the implications of international agency definitions for people’s sustained livelihoods?

Essential

FAO material on the 2014 year of family farming http://www.fao.org/family-farming-2014/en/
Ray Bush (2016) Family Farming in the Near East and North Africa http://www.ipc-undp.org/pub/eng/WP151_Family_farming_in_the_near_East_and_North_Africa.pdf

Ray Bush and Giuliano Martiniello (2017) ‘Food Riots and Protest: Agrarian Modernisations and Structural Crises’, World Development 91 pp193-207
Philip McMichael (2013) Food Regimes and Agrarian Questions
Habib Ayeb and Ray Bush (2019) Food Insecurity and Revolution in the Middle East: Agrarian Questions in Egypt and Tunisia especially chapter 4
FAO, The state of food insecurity in the world 2013 http://www.fao.org/publications/SOFI/en/
FAO, Committee on food security http://www.fao.org/cfs/en/
McMichael, P. 2013, 'Historicizing food sovereignty: a food regime perspective', paper presented at Yale
http://www.tni.org/briefing/historicizing-food-sovereignty?context=69566
McMichael Food Regimes and Agrarian Questions chapters 2-3
Also his ‘A Food regime Geneology’ in Journal of Peasant Studies 36,1 January 2009

Tim Wise (2019) Eating Tomorrow: Agribusiness, family farmers, and the battle for the future of food and lview the book launch and debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12ZnxFZwwJw

H Friedmann and P McMichael 1989 ‘Agriculture and the state system: the rise and fall of national agricultures, 1870 to the present’ Sociologia Ruralis 29, 2,
H Bernstein (2010) Class Dynamics of Agrarian Change ch4
S M Borras et al ‘The politics of biofuels, land and agrarian change: editors introduction’ and
Ben White and A Dasgupta ‘Agrofuels capitalism: a view from political economy’, The Journal of Peasant Studies vol 37, 4, October, 2010
Jason W. Moore (2010) ‘The End of the Road? Agricultural Revolutions in the Capitalist World-Ecology, 1450-2010, Journal of Agrarian Change vol10, 3
J Clapp & S. Ryan Isakson (2018) Speculative Harvests
Peter M. Rosset & Miguel A. Altieri (2017) Agroecology

Seminar: Food Security in the Middle East: the case of Egypt

Questions
1. What do you understand by food security and how is it understood in the Middle East?
2. How do you explain the level of food insecurity in Egypt? Did food poverty have an impact on the uprisings of 2011
3. Do small farmers have a future in Egypt?


Reading Q1:

Ray Bush (2018) The ‘Arab Uprising’ in North Africa: Egypt and Tunisia, in Rami Zurayk et al eds Crisis and Conflict in Agriculture
Chapter 1 in Zahra Babar and Suzi Mirgani eds 2014 Food Security in the Middle East,
Ray Bush (2016) ‘Uprisings without Agrarian Questions’ in Ali Kadri ed Development Challenges and Solutions After the Arab Spring
M. Riad El-Ghonemy, “Recent Changes in Agrarian Reform and Rural Development Strategies in the Near East,” Land Reform Vol. 1, No. 2 (1999): pp. 9-20.
For the World Bank USAID position see
Mohamed A. Faris and Mahmood Hasan Khan, eds., Sustainable Agriculture in Egypt (Boulder, CO: Lynne Reinner, 1993); Lehman B. Fletcher, ed., Egypt’s Agriculture in a Reform Era (Ames: Iowa State University Press, 1996).
World Food Programme, Secondary Data Analysis of the Food Security Situation in Egypt (Regional Bureau for the Middle East, Central Asia and Eastern Europe – ODC Egypt Country Office, May 2011)
Ray Bush, ‘Food Riots’, Symposium: The 2007-8 World Food Crisis,” Journal of Agrarian Change Vol. 10, No.1 (January 2010): pp. 69-129.
Clemens Breisinger, Olivier Ecker, Perrihan Al-Riffai and Bingxin Yu, “Beyond the Arab Awakening: Policies and Investments for Poverty Reduction and Food Security,” International Food Policy Research Institute Food Policy Report (Washington, DC: February,)

Reading Q2
Gilbert Achcar (2014)The People Want
Jack Shenker (2016) The Egyptians
Ray Bush, “Poverty and Neo-Liberal Bias in the Middle East and North Africa,” Development and Change Vol. 35, No. 4 (2004): pp. 673-695.
Habib Ayeb (2013) ’The Marginalisation of the small peasantry: Egypt and Tunisia’ in Ray Bush and Habib Ayeb eds Marginality and Exclusion in Egypt
Ray Bush, 2014, ‘Food Security and Food Sovereignty in Egypt’ in Zahra Babar and Suzi Mirgani eds Food Security in the Middle East, Hurst, London

Timothy Mitchell, “The Market’s Place” in Directions of Change in Rural Egypt, eds. Nicholas S. Hopkins and Kirsten Westergaard (Cairo: The American University Press, 1998).
Clemens Bresinger, Olivier Ecker and Perrihan Al-Riffai, “Economics of the Arab Awakening: From Revolution to Transformation and Food Security,” IFPRI Policy Brief No.18,, May, 2011


Reading Q3
Mubarak’s Legacy for Egypt’s Rural Poor: Returning Land the Landlords” in Land, Poverty and Livelihoods in an Era of Globalization, eds. A. Haroon Akram-Lodhi, Saturnino M. Borras Jr, and Cristóbal Kay (Oxford: Routledge, 2007
Ray Bush, “Coalitions for Dispossession and Networks of Resistance? Land, Politics and Agrarian Reform in Egypt,” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies Vol. 38, No. 3 (December 2011)
Reem Saad (2002) in Ray Bush ed ‘Egyptian Politics and the Tenancy Law’ Counter Revolution in Egypt’s Countryside
Week Eight Beginning
18/03/19
Lecture: Land Grabs and Transfers
This lecture looks at the range and spread of what have been called global land grabs. It will explore the scale of global transactions in land and what some of the consequences of these have been.

S.M.Borras and J.C.Franco (2012) ‘A Land Sovereignty’ Alternative? Towards a Peoples Counter-Enclosure’ July available at https://www.tni.org/files/a_land_sovereignty_alternative_.pdf

Ruth Hall et al eds (2015) Africa’s Land Rush, Especially Intro, then choose a case study.
Special Issue of Journal of Peasant Studies vol42, 3-4, 2015 Land Grabbing
Transnational Institute (TNI) (2012) The Global Land Grab. A Primer. http://www.tni.org/sites/www.tni.org/files/download/landgrabbingprimer_0.pdf (accessed 29 April 2013)
Tony Allan, Martin Keulertz, Suvi Sojamo, and Jeroen Warner, eds., (2013) Handbook of Land and Water Grabs in Africa: Foreign Direct Investment and Food and Water Security
Monthly Review,(2013) 21st century Land Grabs, Monthly Review, 65,6, Nov
Anseeuw, W., M.Boche, T Breu., M., Giger, J. Lay, P., Messerli & K., Nolte (2012)
Transnational Land Deals for Agriculture in the Global South: Analytic Report based
on the Land Matrix Database International Land Coalition (Bern/Montpelier/Hamburg:
CDE/CIRAD/GIGA), http://www.landcoalition.org/publications/transational-land-deals-agriculture-global-south
Land Matrix (2012) The Land Matrix, Beta version: the Online public database on
land deals (ILC/CIRAD?SDE?GIGA?GIZ), http://landportal.info/landmatrix
www.Farmlandgrab.org
Marion Dixon (2013) South South land grabbing: what the case of Egypt and its southern neighbours reveals, http://www.farmlandgrab.org/post/view/22920-south-south-land-grabbing-what-the-case-of-egypt-and-its-southern-neighbours-reveals
Journal of Peasant Studies vol 37, 4, 2010


Seminar: Land grabs and transfers

Questions

1. What is the scale of land transfers (grabs)?
2. How do you explain the presence of land transfers?
3. What has been some of the impact of land grabs?


Readings Q1:
Readings for the lecture above;
Special Issue of (2011) Review of African Political Economy vol38, no.128, June esp essay by Ruth Hall.
Special Issue of (2009) Third World Quarterly Vol 28 no.8
A Haroon Akram-Lodhi, et al eds (2007) Land, Poverty and Livelihoods in an Era of Globalization

Readings Q2:
Alden-Wily, L., (2012) ‘Looking back to see forward: the legal niceties of land theft in
land rushes’. In Special Issues Journal of Peasant Studies, 39 (3&4)
Ray Bush (2007) Poverty and Neoliberalism chapter 4
Saturnino Borras Jr an Wolfgang Sachs and Tilman Santarius eds Fair Future (2007) chapters 3&4
Krishna Ghimire (2001) ed. Land Reform and Peasant Livelihoods: The Social Dynamics of Rural Poverty and Agrarian Reforms in Developing Countries
Food crisis and the global land grab
http://farmlandgrab.org/

Readings Q3:
S Borras and J Franco (2010) ‘From threat to opportunity? Problems with the idea of a ‘code of conduct’ for land grabbing. Yale Human Rights and Development Law Journal 13, 1
Ruth Hall, Marc Edelman et al.(2016) Resistance, acquiescence or incorporation? An introduction to land grabbing and political reactions ‘from below’
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi /full/10.1080/03066150.2015.10 36746

W Wolford,Saturnino Borras and Ruth Hall eds Land Deals: The Role of the State in the Rush for Land

Anthony Pahnke, Rebecca Tarlau and Wendy Wolford (2016) Understanding rural resistance: contemporary mobilization in the Brazilian countryside Journal of Peasant Studies
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi /full/10.1080/03066150.2015.10 46447

Tsegaye Moreda (2017) ‘Large Scale Land Acquisitions, state authority and indigenous local communities: insights from Ethiopia’ in Third World Quarterly 38,3.
Kjersti Thorkildsen (2016) Land yes, dam no!’ Justice-seeking strategies by the anti-dam movement in the Ribeira Valley, Brazil Journal of Peasant Studies
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi /full/10.1080/03066150.2016.12 17842

Week Nine Beginning 25/11/19










Lecture: Land Reform and social transformation in southern Africa
Two case studies highlight the possibilities for reform from below and the difficulties of realising promises for reform. The lecture examines the contrasting fortunes of redistributive land reform in Zimbabwe and South Africa.

Essential
Ian Scoones, (2010) ‘Chapter 1’ in Scoones, ed. Zimbabwe’s land reform: myths and realities
H Bernstein ‘Land Reform in Southern Africa in World Historical Perspective’ in Review of African Political Economy vol 30, no.96, 2003 pp203-226
Review of African Political Economy,(2019) vol 46, number 159, Agrarian Change in Zimbabwe. See articles that cover the general and farm workers, gender and the state. See also the introduction by Grasien Mkodzongi and Peter Lawrence


Seminar: Fast track Zimbabwe, Slow track South Africa?

Questions
1. What is meant by the fast track land reform in Zimbabwe after 2000?
2. Why did the fast track reforms emerge when they did and what has been some of the impact?
3. What has been the promise and practice of land reform in South Africa?


Reading Q1
Ian Scoones, (2010) ‘Chapter 1’ in Scoones, ed. Zimbabwe’s land reform: myths and realities
Sachikonye, L. (2003) ‘'From 'Growth with Equity' to 'Fast-Track' Reform: Zimbabwe's Land Question’, Review of African Political Economy No. 96, pp. 227-40
See also by Sachikonye, ‘Old wine in new bottles? Revisiting contract farming after agrarian reform in Zimbabwe’ in Review of African Political Economy 43,S1 86-98
Cliffe, L. (2000) ‘The Politics of Land Reform in Zimbabwe’, in Boyer-Bower and Stoneman, eds., Land reform in Zimbabwe: constraints and prospects
Bush, R. and Szeftel, M. (2000) ‘Commentary - The Struggle for Land’, Review of African Political Economy No.84, pp.173-80

Readings Q2
Rory Pilossof (2014) ‘Fantasy and Reality: Fast Track Land Reform in Zimbabwe and the New Realities’ Journal of Agrarian Change 14, 1, January
A Hammar (2012) ‘Zimbabwe’s Land Reform: Myths and Realities (review)’ African Studies Review 55,1
Lionel Cliffe et al (2011) ‘An Overview of Fast Track Land Reform in Zimbabwe: Editorial Introduction’, Journal of Peasant Studies 38,5
Lionel Cliffe ‘Land Reform in Zimbabwe, Myths and realities’ Review of African Political Economy
Sam Moyo (2011) ‘Land concentration and accumulation after redistributive reform in post-settler Zimbabwe’ in Review of African Political Economy, 38, 128
Bridget O’Laughlin et al (2013) ‘Introduction: Agrarian change, Rural Poverty and Land Reform in South Africa since 1994’, in Journal of Agrarian Change vol 13, no 1 January
World Bank (1994) South African Agriculture: Structure, Performance and options for the future
Lionel Cliffe (1988) Zimbabwe's agricultural ‘success’ and food security in Southern Africa in Review of African Political Economy 15, 43
_________’Land Reform in South Africa’ in Review of African Political Economy 27, 84 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03056248808703788
Readings Q3
Ben Cousins interview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cQ-ww8Zv7Q
Ben Cousins, March (2018), https://theconversation.com/south-africas-land-debate-is-clouded-by-misrepresentation-and-lack-of-data-93078

Special Issue of Journal of Agrarian Change vol 13, 1, January 2013 Agrarian Change, Rural Poverty and Land Reform in South African since 1994
Lionel Cliffe http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03056240008704459

Peter Jacobs (2012) ‘Whither agrarian reform in South Africa?’ Review of African Political Economy 39, 131
E Lahiff (2007) ‘Willing buyer, willing seller’: South Africa’s Failed Experiment in Market-Led Agrarian Reform’ in Third World Quarterly, 28, (8)
David Neves and A Du Toit (2013) ‘Rural Livelihoods in South Africa: Complexity, Vulnerability and Differentiation’ in Journal of Agrarian Change 13, 1
R Hall 2004) ‘A Political Economy of Land reform in South Africa’ Review of African Political Economy 100
_________(2011) ‘Land Grabbing in Southern Africa’: the Many faces of the investor rush’ Review of African Political Economy 38, 128



Week Ten Beginning 2/11/19

Lecture: Food sovereignty, Labour and social movements
This lectures explores the alternative to the debate about food security by exploring the ideas and social movements behind food sovereignty

War on Want, Food Sovereignty http://www.waronwant.org/attachments/Food%20sovereignty%20report.pdf
Borras and Franco, 2012, 'A Land Sovereignty Alternative? Towards a peoples' counter-enclosure'
http://www.tni.org/briefing/land-sovereignty-alternative
McMichael, P. 2013, 'Historicizing food sovereignty: a food regime perspective', paper presented at Yale
http://www.tni.org/briefing/historicizing-food-sovereignty?context=69566
Ashlesha Khadisa, Peter Rosset Heida Morales and B G Ferguson (2018) ‘taking agroecology to scale: the budget neutral farming peasant movement in Karnataka, India’, Journal of Peasant Studies, 45,1, pp192-219
Peter Rosset (2013) ‘Rethinking agrarian reform, land and territory in La Via Campesina’ in Journal of Peasant Studies 4, 40, 721-775
B Argarwal (2014) ‘Food Sovereignty, Food Security and Democratic Choice: Critical Contradictions, Difficult Conciliations’ in Journal of Peasant Studies 41, 6,
Antonio Roman-Alcalá (2016) ‘Conceptualising components, conditions and trajectories of food sovereignty’s sovereignty’, Third World Quarterly 37,8,1388-1407
Friedmann, Harriet. 2016. ‘Bernstein-McMichael-Friedmann Dialogue on Food Regimes. Commentary: Food regime analysis and agrarian questions: widening the conversation’. The Journal of Peasant Studies vol 43, no.3. 671-692
Timothy A Wise (2010)
McMichael, Philip. 2016. ‘Bernstein-McMichael-Friedmann Dialogue on Food Regimes. Commentary: Food regime for thought’. The Journal of Peasant Studies, vol 43, No.3: 648-670
Ray Bush and Giuliano Martiniello (2017), ‘Food Riots and Protest Agricultural Modernisations and Structural Crises’, World Development vol 91
Samir Amin (2010), ‘Popular movements towards Socialism: Their Unity and Diversity’ Monthly Review 66,2,
An Interview with Samir Amin, 2014, Review of African Political Economy, 41, S1 and his ‘The Sovereign Popular Project: The Alternative to Liberal Globalisation. In Journal of Labor and Society vol 20, March 2017, 7-22



Seminar: DEBATE

EVERY ONE WATCH/LISTEN to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12ZnxFZwwJw
Book launch of Tim Wises’s Eating Tomorrow.

Half the group to advocate for the following statement and half to oppose it.

Food Sovereignty or Food Security:

Food for all can only be achieved is if there are regulatory policies for new relationships between the market and family agriculture, between producers and consumers and between the North and the South: in short, food sovereignty.



The argument is played out in

H Bernstein,(2013) ‘'Food sovereignty: a skeptical view', paper presented at Yale
http://www.tni.org/briefing/food-sovereignty-skeptical-view?context=69566 and Journal of Peasant Studies 41,6, 2014,1031-1063
van der Ploeg, J. D. 2013, 'Peasant-driven agricultural growth and food sovereignty', paper presented at Yale
http://www.tni.org/briefing/peasant-driven-agricultural-growth-and-food-sovereignty?context=69566
Habib Ayeb and Ray Bush (2019) Food Insecurity and Revolution in the Middle East especially chapter 7

P McMichael (2013) Food Regimes and Agrarian Questions
Special Issue of Journal of Peasant Studies 41, 2014
M Walsh-Dilley et al (2016) ‘Food Sovereignty, power, resilience in development practice’, Ecology and Society 21, 1, 11
La Via Campesina. (2010). Sustainable peasant and family farm agriculture can feed the world. Available at https://viacampesina.org/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2010/04/Small-Farmere-Feed-the-World.compressed.pdf

For Food security see the World Bank material in this handbook, available at www.worldbank.org
Those opposing the motion might consider whether there is often a false polarity between sovereignty and security. Is the contrast between food security and food sovereignty a false one?

Hannah Wittman et al (2011) eds Food Sovereignty
Annete Aurelie Desmarais (2007) La Via Campesina: Globalisation and the Power of Peasants

Ngcoya, M., & Kumarakulasingam, N. (2016). The Lived Experience of Food Sovereignty: Gender, Indigenous Crops and Small‐Scale Farming in Mtubatuba, South Africa. Journal of Agrarian Change
https://doi.org/10.1111/joac.12170
Pauline Peters (2013) ‘Conflicts over land and threats to customary tenure in Africa’ in African Affairs 112, no.449, October
Samir Amin (2008) ‘The Defence of humanity requires the radicalisation of popular struggles’ in L Panitch and C Leys eds Violence Today, Socialist Register 2009
Borras and Franco, 2012, 'A Land Sovereignty Alternative? Towards a peoples' counter-enclosure'
http://www.tni.org/briefing/land-sovereignty-alternative
McMichael, P. 2013, 'Historicizing food sovereignty: a food regime perspective', paper presented at Yale
http://www.tni.org/briefing/historicizing-food-sovereignty?context=69566
War on Want, Food Sovereignty
http://www.waronwant.org/attachments/Food%20sovereignty%20report.pdf
Eric Holt-Giménez ed (2011) Food Movements Unite! Esp. chapter 1 and 2
See also http://www.foodfirst.org/
Bernstein, H. 2013, 'Food sovereignty: a skeptical view', paper presented at Yale
http://www.tni.org/briefing/food-sovereignty-skeptical-view?context=69566
‘Farmers and social movements say no to land grabbing’, 13 November 2009
http://www.grain.org/m/?id=268#
Land grabbing and the global food crisis, November 2009
http://www.grain.org/o_files/landgrabbing-presentation-11-2009.pdf
World Bank (2010) ‘Awakening Africa’s Sleeping Giant’ http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTARD/Resources/336681-1231508336979/SleepingGiantFinal.pdf

Hamouchene, Hamza. (2017) ‘Jemna in Tunisia: an inspiring land struggle in North Africa’ in Open Democracy 13 April, available at https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/north-africa-west-asia/jemna-in-tunisia-inspiring-land-struggle-in-north-africa/


Can international agencies advance alternative food security/sovereignty debates?
United Nations. (2017) General Assembly Resolution adopted by the General Assembly on 20 December. ‘UN Decade of Family Farming 2019-2018 https://digitallibrary.un.org/record/1479766 (accessed 9 April 2019)
United Nations. (2018) General Assembly 73rd Session Resolution Adopted by the General Assembly 17 December 2018. https://viacampesina.org/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/03/UN_Declaration_on_the_rights_of_peasants_and_other_people_working-in-rural_areas.pdf


FAO, 2003 World Agriculture: Towards 2015/2030, an FAO Perspective. http://www.fao.org/3/a-y4252e.pdf (accessed 27 March 2019)
FAO. 2013. International Year of Family Farming 2014 Master Plan (final version) (30 May 2013). Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. <http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/iyff/docs/Final_Master_Plan_IYFF_2014_30-05.pdf>.


Week Eleven
Beginning
9/11/19






Research Report Preparation: How to assemble the report and why it is not just another essay assignment







                             

This list was last updated on 16/09/2019