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CLAS3595
Heroines: Module Reading List

Heroines: Representations of Mythological Women from Antiquity to the Present, 2019/20, Semester 1, 2
Dr Paul White
p.m.white@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

PRIMARY READING

Texts marked * should be purchased (if possible) before the start of Semester 1.

 

Anouilh, Jean. 1967. ‘Medea’ in: The collected plays. Vol. 2. Methuen.

Atwood, Margaret, et al. “Helen of Troy: Modern Poetry Selection” [VLE]

Boccaccio, Giovanni. 2011. ‘Dido’ in: On famous women. Translated by Guido A Guarino. New York: Italica Press.

Chaucer. 2001. “The Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea.” Text and modern English version online at eChaucer: http://ummutility.umm.maine.edu/necastro/chaucer/texts/lgw/lgw4hypsipylemedea07.html

Corneille, Pierre. 2015. Medea [Selections] Translated by P. White. [VLE]

*Euripides. 2008. ‘Medea’, ‘Hippolytus’ and ‘Helen’ in: Medea and other plays. Translated by James Morwood. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

Giraudoux, Jean. 1955. Tiger at the gates = La Guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu. Translated by Christopher Fry. New York: Oxford University Press.

Jodelle, Etienne. 2015. The Death of Dido [Selections] Translated by P. White. [VLE]

Marlowe, Christopher. 2003. ‘Dido, Queen of Carthage’ in: The complete plays. Edited by Frank Romany and Robert Lindsey. London, England; New York, N.Y.: Penguin Books.

*Ovid. 1990. ‘Phaedra’, ‘Dido’, ‘Medea’, ‘Helen’, in: Heroides. Translated by H. Isbell. London: Penguin Books.

Racine, Jean. 2000. ‘Phaedra’ in: Three plays : Andromache, Phaedra, Athaliah. Translated by Tim Chilcott. Ware: Wordsworth.

*Seneca. 2010. ‘Medea’, ‘Phaedra’ in: Six tragedies. Translated by E. Wilson. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

Virgil. 2003. ‘Book 4’, in: The Aeneid. Translated by David West. London; New York: Penguin Books.

 

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SECONDARY READING

 

Medea

 

Allan, William. 2002. Euripides : Medea. London: Duckworth.

Charpentier, F. 1995. “Médée Figure de La Passion d’Euripide À l’Age Classique.” In Prémices et floraison de l'Age classique : mélanges en l'honneur de Jean Jehasse, 387–406. Publications de l’Université de Saint-Étienne.   Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva.

Clauss, James Joseph, and Sarah Iles Johnston, eds. 1997. Medea : essays on Medea in myth, literature, philosophy, and art. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.

Davis, P. J. 2012. “‘A Simple Girl’?: Medea in Ovid ‘Heroides’ 12.” Ramus. 41 (1/2): 33–48. Available online: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9155397&fileId=S0048671X00000242

Fumaroli, Marc. 1990. “De Médée À Phèdre: Naissance et Mise À Mort de La Tragédie Cornélienne.” In Héros et orateurs : rhétorique et dramaturgie cornéliennes, 493–518. Geneva: Droz. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva.

Heavey, Katherine. 2015. The early modern Medea : Medea in English literature, 1558-1688.

Hinds, Stephen. 1993. “Medea in Ovid: Scenes from the Life of an Intertextual Heroine.” Materiali E Discussioni per L’analisi Dei Testi Classici, no. 30: 9–47.

Lawrence, Stuart. 1997. “Audience Uncertainty and Euripides’ Medea.” Hermes. 125 (1): 49–55.

McDermott, Emily A. 2010. Euripides' Medea : the incarnation of disorder. Penn State Press.

Morse, Ruth. 1996. The medieval Medea. Cambridge [England]; Rochester, NY, USA: D.S. Brewer.

Percival, Florence. 1998. Chaucer's legendary good women. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Trinacty, Christopher. 2007. “Seneca’s Heroides: Elegy in Seneca’s Medea.” The Classical Journal. 103 (1): 63–78.

Taplin, Oliver, Fiona Macintosh, and Edith Hall, eds. 2000. Medea in performance 1500-2000. Oxford: Legenda.

Walsh, Lisl. 2012. “The Metamorphoses of Seneca’s Medea.” Ramus. 41 (1–2): 71–93. Available online: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9155403&fileId=S0048671X00000266

Wygant, Amy. 2007. Medea, magic, and modernity in France : stages and histories, 1553-1797. Aldershot, England; Burlington, VT: Ashgate Pub. Co.

 

Dido

 

Buckley, Emma. 2011. “‘Live False Aeneas!’Marlowe’s Dido, Queen of Carthage and the Limits of Translation.” Classical Receptions Journal 3 (2): 129–147.

Burden, Michael, ed. 1998. A Woman Scorn’d: Responses to the Dido Myth. London: Faber.

Casali, Sergio. 2004. “Further Voices in Ovid ‘Heroides 7.’” Hermathena, no. 177/178: 147–64.

Desmond, Marilynn. 1993. “When Dido Reads Vergil-Gender and Intertextuality in Ovid ‘Heroides’ 7.” Helios 20 (1): 56–68.

———. 1994. Reading Dido : gender, textuality, and the medieval Aeneid. Minneapolis, Minn.: University of Minnesota Press. http://site.ebrary.com/id/10159399.

Fantham, Elaine. 1975. “Virgil’s Dido and Seneca’s Tragic Heroines.” Greece and Rome. 22 (1): 1–10.

Franklin, Margaret Ann. 2006. Boccaccio's heroines : power & virtue in Renaissance society. Women and Gender in the Early Modern World. Aldershot: Ashgate.

Gill, Roma. 1977. “Marlowe’s Virgil: Dido Queene of Carthage.” Review of English studies. 28 (110): 141–55.

Gutting, E. 2006. “Marriage in the Aeneid: Venus, Vulcan, and Dido.” Classical Philology. 101 (3): 263–79. doi:10.1086/511017.

“Jodelle, Didon se sacrifiant.” 2014. Fabula Colloques en ligne. Available online: http://www.fabula.org/colloques/document2250.phphttp://www.fabula.org/colloques/sommaire2249.php.

Kallendorf, Craig. 1985. “Boccaccio’s Dido and the Rhetorical Criticism of Virgil’s‘ Aeneid.’” Studies in philology. 82 (4): 401–415.

Kinney, Clare R. 2000. “Epic Transgression and the Framing of Agency in ‘Dido Queen of Carthage.’” Studies in English literature, 1500-1900. 40 (2): 261–76. doi:10.2307/1556128.

Martin, René, ed. 1990. Enée et Didon : naissance, fonctionnement et survie d'un mythe. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

Potter, Lucy. 2009. “Marlowe’s Dido: Virgilian or Ovidian?” Notes and queries. 56 (4): 540–44. doi:10.1093/notesj/gjp201.

Stump, Donald. 2000. “Marlowe’s Travesty of Virgil: Dido and Elizabethan Dreams of Empire.” Comparative drama. 34 (1): 79–107. doi:10.1353/cdr.2000.0035.

Ternaux, Jean-Claude, and Sabine Lardon. 2013. Jodelle : Didon se sacrifiant. Neuilly: Atlande.

 

Phaedra

 

Armstrong, Rebecca. 2006. Cretan women : Pasiphae, Ariadne, and Phaedra in Latin poetry. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

Fantham, Elaine. 1975. “Virgil’s Dido and Seneca’s Tragic Heroines.” Greece and Rome. 22 (1): 1–10.

Fumaroli, Marc. 1990. “De Médée À Phèdre: Naissance et Mise À Mort de La Tragédie Cornélienne.” In Héros et orateurs : rhétorique et dramaturgie cornéliennes, 493–518. Geneva: Droz.

James, E. D, and Gillian Jondorf. 1994. Racine : Phèdre. Cambridge; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Mayer, Roland. 2002. Seneca : Phaedra. London: Duckworth.

Mills, Sophie. 2002. Euripides : Hippolytus. London: Duckworth.

Roisman, Hanna. 1999. Nothing is as it seems : the tragedy of the implicit in Euripides' Hippolytus. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

 

Helen

 

Austin, Norman. 1994. Helen of Troy and her shameless phantom. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Backès, Jean Louis. 1984. Le mythe d'Hélène. Clermont-Ferrand [France: Adosa.]

Belfiore, Elizabeth. 1980. “Ovid’s Encomium of Helen.” The Classical Journal. 76 (2): 136–148.

Blondell, Ruby. 2013. Helen of Troy : beauty, myth, devastation.

Drinkwater, Megan O. 2013. “An Amateur’s Art: Paris and Helen in Ovid’s Heroides.” Classical Philology. 108 (2): 111–25. doi:10.1086/671416.

Gumpert, Matthew. 2001. Grafting Helen : the abduction of the classical past. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Korzeniowska, Victoria B. 2003. Giraudoux : "La guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu.".. London: Grant & Cutler.

Lewis, Roy. 1971. Giraudoux : "La guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu.". London: Edward Arnold.

Maguire, Laurie E. 2009. Helen of Troy : from Homer to Hollywood. Chichester, U.K.; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.

Mazurek, Elizabeth Forbis. 2006. “Elegy and Epic and the Recognition of Paris: Ovid Heroides 16.” Arethusa. 39 (1): 47–70. doi:10.1353/are.2006.0004.

Suzuki, Mihoko. 1989. Metamorphoses of Helen : authority, difference, and the epic. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

 

Classical heroines: general

 

Bolton, M. C. 2009. “Gendered Spaces in Ovid’s Heroides.” The classical world. 102 (3): 273–90. doi:10.1353/clw.0.0099.

Franklin, Margaret Ann. 2006. Boccaccio's heroines : power & virtue in Renaissance society. Women and Gender in the Early Modern World. Aldershot: Ashgate.

Fulkerson, Laurel. 2009. The Ovidian heroine as author : reading, writing, and community in the Heroides. Cambridge Univ Pr.

Hagedorn, Suzanne C. 2004. Abandoned women : rewriting the classics in Dante, Boccaccio, and Chaucer. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Lindheim, Sara H. 2003. Mail and female : epistolary narrative and desire in Ovid's Heroides. Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin Press.

McClure, Laura. 1999. Spoken like a woman : speech and gender in Athenian drama. Princeton University Press.

McKinley, Kathryn L. 2001. Reading the Ovidian heroine : 'Metamorphoses' commentaries, 1100-1618. Leiden; Boston: Brill.

Percival, Florence. 1998. Chaucer's legendary good women. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Spentzou, Efrossini. 2003. Readers and writers in Ovid's Heroides : transgressions of genre and gender. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

White, Paul. 2009. Renaissance postscripts : responding to Ovid's Heroides in sixteenth-century France. Columbus: Ohio State University Press.

 

Contexts and theory

 

Cairns, Francis. 1972. Generic composition in Greek and Roman poetry. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

D’Ambra, Eve. 2007. Roman women. Cambridge Introduction to Roman Civilization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip065/2005036464.html.

Genette, Gérard. 1997. Palimpsests [electronic resource] : literature in the second degree. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Grafton, Anthony, Glenn W Most, and Salvatore Settis, eds. 2010. The classical traditionExtracts available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva.

Harrison, S. J. 2007. Generic enrichment in Vergil and Horace. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

Hinds, Stephen. 1998. Allusion and intertext : dynamics of appropriation in Roman poetry. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Littlewood, C. A. J. 2004. Self-representation and illusion in Senecan tragedy . Oxford Classical Monographs. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Martindale, Charles. 1993. Redeeming the text : Latin poetry and the hermeneutics of reception. Cambridge University Press.

———. 2007. “Reception.” In A companion to the classical tradition, edited by Craig W. Kallendorf, 295–311. Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva.

Powell, Anton, ed. 1990. Euripides, women, and sexuality. London: Routledge.

Sichi, Gérard. 2010. “Anouilh et son temps : les allusions à l’actualité.” Etudes litteraires 41 (1): 129. doi:10.7202/044575ar.

This list was last updated on 08/07/2016