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HIST3001
Weekly Reading Lists for Semester 1

Conquest, Convivencia and Conflict: Christian and Muslim Spain, 711-1212, 2019/20, Semester 1, 2
Dr Jonathan Jarrett
TBC
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Week 1. Introduction. The Córdoba Center and its Meanings: Owning Spain's Muslim Past

Required Readings (in chronological order)

Although normally the week’s reading for this course will consist of a primary source extract and two or three chapter-length secondary readings, in the first week as we all find our feet we’ll read a number of blog posts that will help expose some preconceptions of our own and of the world around us about the interactions of Christians and Muslims in medieval Spain. The focus is a controversy over the proposed erection of a Muslim community centre in downtown New York City in 2010.

The Cordoba Initiative, ‘Cordoba House – New York City’, Internet Archive Wayback Machine <https://web.archive.org/web/20100801075326/http://www.cordobainitiative.org/?q=content/cordoba-house-new-york-city> [captured 1 August 2010 as of 9 July 2018]; the page was first captured 12 May 2010 and was removed by 18 August 2010  

Newt Gingrich, ‘Newt Gingrich Statement on Proposed Mosque/Islamic Community Center near Ground Zero’, Internet Archive Wayback Machine, <https://web.archive.org/web/20101221002217/http://www.newt.org/newt-direct/newt-gingrich-statement-proposed-mosqueislamic-community-center-near-ground-zero> [captured 21 December 2010 as of 9 July 2018]; the page was first captured 20 August 2010 and was removed between 21 December 2010 and 17 July 2011  

Carl Pyrdum, ‘Professor Newt’s Distorted History Lesson’, Got Medieval, 2 August 2010 <http://www.gotmedieval.com/2010/08/professor-newts-distorted-history-lesson.html> [last modified not specified as of 9 July 2018] 

Jonathan Jarrett, ‘Cordoba: 1010, in the 20:20 of hindsight’, Cliopatria, 22 September 2010 <http://historynewsnetwork.org/blog/131559> [last modified not specified as of 9 July 2018] 

Questions to Think About

What are your associations with the name Cordoba? Was it a wise choice of name? Leaving their actual politics aside, which side of the controversy was more guilty of distorting history? How have perceptions on such issues changed since 2010?

Additional Reading

Further Journalistic or Internet Commentary (in order of publication)

Javier C. Hernández, ‘Planned Sign of Tolerance Bringing Division Instead’, New York Times, 13 July 2010 <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/14/nyregion/14center.html> [last modified 1 October 2014 as of 9 July 2018]

Michael Bérubé, ‘This Plush Interior Will Not Stand’, Crooked Timber, 8 August 2010 <http://crookedtimber.org/2010/08/08/this-plush-interior-will-not-stand/> [last modified 8 August 2010 as of 9 July 2018]

Charlie Brooker, ‘“Ground Zero Mosque”? The Reality is Less Provocative’, The Guardian, 23 August 2010 <https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/aug/23/charlie-brooker-ground-zero-mosque> [last modified 25 August 2010 as of 9 July 2018]

Lloyd Grove, ‘“Ground Zero Imam”: My Regrets’, The Daily Beast, 30 November 2011 <http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/06/30/feisal-abdul-rauf-on-ground-zero-mosque-his-regrets-donald-trump-fox-news-and-9-11.html> [last modified not available as of 9 July 2018]

Academic Writing (in reverse chronological order)

Alejandro García-Sanjuán, ‘Rejecting al-Andalus, Exalting the Reconquista: Historical Memory in Contemporary Spain’, Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies, 10 (2018), 127–45

Muneeza Shamsie, ‘Introduction: The Enduring Legacy of al-Andalus’, Journal of Postcolonial Writing, 52.2 (2016), 127–35

Hugh Kennedy, The Caliphate (London: Penguin, 2016): short, clear and very learned

Ayman Talal Yousef, ‘Stereotyping Islam in Western Perceptions between Fundamentalism and Phobia: Analytical and Critical Reading’, Journal of Islamic Studies and Culture, 1 (2013), 12‑26 <http://jiscnet.com/journals/jisc/Vol_1_No_1_June_2013/2.pdf> [last modified 30 November 2013 as of 9 July 2018]

Ibrahim Kalin, ‘Roots of Misconception: Euro-American Perceptions of Islam Before and After September 11’, in Islam, Fundamentalism and the Betrayal of Tradition: Essays by Western Muslim Scholars, ed. by Joseph E. B. Lumbard, revised edn. (Bloomington, IN: World Wisdom, 2009), pp. 143-87 <http://www.worldwisdom.com/public/viewpdf/default.aspx? article-title=Euro-American_Perceptions_of_Islam_Before_and_After_Sept_11.pdf> [last modified 13 October 2009 as of 27 June 2016]

Shahrough Akhavi, ‘Islam and the West in World History’, Third World QuarterlyISSN: 0143-6597, 24 (2003), 545‑62

María Rosa Menocal, The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain (New York City: Little, Brown & Co., 2002), pp. 53-100

Nuha N. N. Khoury, ‘The Meaning of the Great Mosque of Cordoba in the Tenth Century’, MuqarnasISSN: 0732-2292, 13 (1996), 80–98

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Week 2. Visigothic Spain and its Fall. Thinking about Dissertations

This week’s class will be divided into two parts. In the first half, we will study the western half of the immediate background of our module, the circumstances that led to the collapse of the Visigothic kingdom of Spain. I will open this session with an example presentation to demonstrate the kind of role I would like the student presentations in following weeks to play.

In the second half of the class, we will begin discussion of the dissertation that most or all of you will be doing in parallel with this module. What kind of dissertations can be done with this module, what problems and possibilities are there, and what is the process for completing a dissertation in the School of History? Hopefully all these questions and more can be answered!

Required Readings

Primary Source

The Visigothic Code ( Forum Iudicum ), trans. by Samuel P. Scott (Boston, MA: Boston Book Co. 1910) <http://libro.uca.edu/vcode/visigoths.htm> [last modified 16 August 2000 as of 9 July 2016], pp. 305–19 (Book IX Title I) and pp. 380–409 (Book XII Title III); also have a look at the Contents to see what is covered that’s not hunting down deviants  

Secondary Writing (in suggested order)

R. D. Shaw, ‘The Fall of the Visigothic Power in Spain’, English Historical Review, 21 (1906), 209–28  

Roger Collins, Visigothic Spain 409-711 (Oxford: Blackwell, 2004), pp. 92–116  

Javier Arce Martínez, ‘The Visigoths in Spain: Old and New Historical Problems’, in Der frühmittelalterliche Staat : europäische Perspektiven ISBN: 9783700166047 (pbk.); 3700166044 (pbk.), ed. by Walter Pohl and Veronika Wieser (Wien: Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2009), pp. 31‑42 OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 23/09/2019)   

Questions to Think About

Was Visigothic Spain a strong or a weak kingdom? What held the state together, and where did these things fail? Is the speed of the Muslim conquest to be explained by internal problems in Spain? Or is this how our sources sought to explain the state’s failure?

Additional Reading

Primary Sources

Ibn ‘Abd al-Hakam, Narrative of the Conquest of al-Andalus, trans. by David A. Cohen, in Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources, ed. by Olivia Remie Constable (Philadelphia: Pennsylvania University Press, 1997), pp. 32-36 (no. 6B)

The Chronicle of 754, trans. by Kenneth Baxter Wolf in Conquerors and Chroniclers of Early Medieval Spain, ed. by Wolf, 2nd edn. (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1999), pp. 111-60, chapters 1-55; also in 1st edn. (1990)

Secondary Writing (in reverse chronological order)

Jamie Wood and Javier Martínez Jiménez, ‘New Directions in the Study of Visigothic Spain’, History Compass, 14 (2016), 29-38

Abilio Barbero and María Isabel Loring García, ‘The Catholic Visigothic Kingdom’, in The New Cambridge Medieval History, Vol. 1: c. 500-c. 700, ed. by Paul Fouracre (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 346-70

*Peter Linehan, History and the Historians of Medieval Spain (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993), pp. 51-94

Pierre Bonnassie, ‘Society and Mentalities in Visigothic Spain’, in Bonnassie, From Slavery to Feudalism in South-Western Europe, trans. by Jean Birrell (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), pp. 60-103

Politics and Government

Damián Fernández, ‘Statehood, Taxation, and State Infrastructural Power in Visigothic Iberia’, in Ancient States and Infrastructural Power: Europe, Asia and America, ed. by Clifford Ando and Seth Richardson (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017), pp. 243–71

Manuel Castro Priego, ‘Absent Coinage: Archaeological Contexts and Tremisses on the Central Iberian Peninsula in the 7th and 8th Centuries AD’, Medieval Archaeology, 60 (2016), 27–56

Andrew Fear, ‘God and Caesar: The Dynamics of Visigothic Monarchy’, in Every Inch a King: Comparative Studies on Kings and Kingship in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds, ed. by Lynette G. Mitchell (Leiden: Brill, 2013), pp. 285–302

Pablo C. Díaz, ‘Confiscations in the Visigothic Reign of Toledo: A Political Instrument’, in Expropriations et confiscations dans les royaumes barbares : une approche régionale, ed. by Pierfrancesco Porena and Yann Rivière (Rome: École Française de Rome, 2012), pp. 93–112

*Pablo de la Cruz Díaz Martínez and María del Rosario Valverde Castro, ‘The Theoretical Strength and Practical Weakness of the Visigothic Monarchy of Toledo’, in Rituals of Power: From Late Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages, ed. by Franz Theuws and Janet L. Nelson (Leiden: Brill, 2000), pp. 59-93

Jews in the Visigothic Kingdom

Wolfram Drews, ‘Barbarians and Jews in Early Medieval Spain: Shifting Constellations of Religion and Identity’, in Barbarians and Jews: Jews and Judaism in the Early Medieval West, ed. by Yitzhak Hen and Thomas F. X. Noble (Leiden: Brill, 2018), pp. 47‒67

Rachel L. Stocking, ‘Early Medieval Christian Identity and Anti-Judaism: The Case of the Visigothic Kingdom’, Religion Compass, 2 (2008), 642-58

Raúl González-Salinero, ‘Catholic Anti-Judaism in Visigothic Spain’, in The Visigoths: Studies in Culture and Society, ed. by Alberto Ferreiro (Leiden: Brill, 1999), pp. 123-50

Norman Roth, Jews, Visigoths and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Cooperation and Conflict (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1994), pp. 7-40

Francis X. Murphy, ‘Julian of Toledo and the Fall of the Visigothic Kingdom in Spain’, Speculum, 27 (1952), 1–27

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Dissertation Workshop 1: Choosing a Topic

In the course of Week 3 we will schedule a 1-hour workshop where we can discuss what makes a topic workable, possible or interesting and how to handle these requirements within the specific space of the topics you’re thinking about (which may not necessarily belong to this module). No special preparation is required for this workshop, but look through the handbook for possible areas of research—use the ‘questions to think with’ as a guide—and come armed with at least one possible topic. Two is better! 

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Dissertation Tutorials

There will be tutorials scheduled in Week 3, in which we can discuss potential dissertation topics and how to start on them on a one-to-one basis. These will be arranged by distribution of a sign-up sheet in the Week 2 class.

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Week 3. The Rise of Islam from East to West

Required Readings

Primary Sources

Qu’ran, either in The Qurʼān : a new annotated translationn, trans. by Arthur Droge (London: Equinox, 2013), pp. 113-23 OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) , Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

or in The Koran, trans. by Nessim Dawood, 6th edn. (London: Penguin, 2006), pp. 122-35 (Sūra 9: Repentance): compare, if possible, to Sūra 2: The Cow.
Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva  
 
 

The Chronicle of Moissac, years 602-785, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett from Monumenta Germaniae Historica (Scriptores in folio) tomus I, ed. Georg Heinrich Pertz (Hannover: Hahn, 1826), pp. 280-313 (286-97) <http://www.mgh.de/dmgh/resolving/MGH_SS_1_S._289> [last modified 4 April 2011 as of 12 July 2016]: available on Minerva 

Secondary Writing

Richard Fletcher, The Cross and the Crescent: The Dramatic Story of the Earliest Encounters between Christians and Muslims (London: Penguin, 2003), pp. 1-29  OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019)  

Paul Fouracre, The Age of Charles Martel (Harlow: Pearson, 2000), pp. 79-120  OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Questions to Think About

How far was Islam under the control of its rulers? Was it ineluctable that once Islam had conquered Africa, it would go on to tackle Spain? Was Francia ever really a target in the same way? And how thoroughly was Spain brought under Arab control at this stage?

Additional Reading

Primary Sources

Yves Gleize, Fanny Mendisco, Marie-Hélène Pemonge, Christophe Hubert, Alexis Groppi, Bertrand Houix, Marie-France Deguilloux, Jean-Yves Breuil, ‘Early Medieval Muslim Graves in France: First Archaeological, Anthropological and Palaeogenomic Evidence’, PLoS ONE, 11 (2016), 1-13

The Chronicle of 754, trans. by Kenneth Baxter Wolf in Conquerors and Chroniclers of Early Medieval Spain, ed. by Wolf, 2nd edn. (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1999), pp. 111-60 (111-46, chapters 1-80)

Ibn ‘Abd al-Hakem, History of the Conquest of al-Andalus, trans. as Ibn Abd-el-Hakem’s History of the Conquest of Spain Translated from the Arabic with a Historical Introduction: Inaugural Dissertation Addressed to the Philosophical Faculty of the Georgia Augusta University Göttingen on Promotion to the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, trans. by John Harris Jones (Göttingen: Dieterich’s University Press, 1858) <https://archive.org/details/dhikrfatalandal00jonegoog> [last modified 28 September 2008 as of 12 July 2016], pp. 18-43

Secondary Writing (in reverse chronological order per section)

Arabian and African Background

*Hugh Kennedy, The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates: The Islamic Near East from the Sixth to the Eleventh Century, 2nd edn. (Harlow: Pearson, 2004), pp. 1-122

Patricia Crone, Meccan Trade and the Rise of Islam (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987): see the review by R. Sergeant, ‘Meccan Trade and the Rise of Islam: Misconceptions and Flawed Polemics’, Journal of the American Oriental Society, 90 (1990), 472-86 and the reply, Crone, ‘Sergeant and Meccan Trade’, Arabica, 39 (1992), 216-40

*Michael Cook, Muhammad (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983)

Problems with the Islamic Sources

Nicola Clarke, The Muslim Conquest of Iberia: Medieval Arabic Narratives (London: Routledge, 2013)

Robert Hoyland, ‘Writing the Biography of the Prophet Muhammad: Problems and Solutions’, History Compass, 5 (2007), 581-602

*Michael Cook, The Koran: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000)

The Debate over Jihād in Early Islam

 Non-Academic Stances

Muhammad Hisham Kabbani & Seraj Hendricks, ‘Jihad, Terrorism and Suicide Bombing: The Classical Islamic Perspective’, The Islamic Supreme Council of America <http://islamicsupremecouncil.org/understanding-islam/legal-rulings/21-jihad-classical-islamic-perspective.html? showall=1> [last modified not specified as of 10 July 2016]

Richard P. Bailey, ‘Jihad: The Teaching of Islam from its Primary Sources - the Quran and Hadith’, Answering Islam: A Christian Muslim Dialogue <http://www.answering-islam.org/Bailey/jihad.html> [last modified 25 June 2008 as of 10 July 2016]

 Academic Discussion

Robert Haug, ‘Frontiers and the State in Early Islamic History: Jihād between Caliphs and Volunteers’, History Compass, 9 (2011), 634-43

Richard Bonney, Jihād: From Qu’rān to Bin Laden (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004), pp. 21-52

*Reuven Firestone, Jihad: The Origin of Holy War in Islam (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999)

The Situation in Spain

 Arabists

Hugh Kennedy, Muslim Spain and Portugal: A Political History (London: Longman, 1998), pp.1-29

María Jesús Viguera Molins, ‘The Muslim Settlement of Spania/al-Andalus’, in The Formation of al-Andalus, 1: History and Society, ed. by Manuela Marín (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008), pp. 15-38

*‘Abdulwāhid DhanÅ«n Tāha, The Muslim Conquest and Settlement of North Africa and Spain (London: Routledge, 1989), pp. 1-182: more detail than most accounts—ask yourself why!

 Latinists

Frank Riess, Narbonne and Its Territory in Late Antiquity from the Visigoths to the Arabs (London: Routledge, 2013)

Roger Collins, Visigothic Spain, 409-711 (Oxford: Blackwell, 2004), pp. 117–43

Roger Collins, Early Medieval Spain: Unity in Diversity, 400-1000, 2nd ed. (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1995), pp. 144-80

*Roger Collins, The Arab Conquest of Spain, 710-797 (Oxford: Blackwells, 1989), pp. 23-96

 Both or Neither

Elizabeth Drayson, ‘Ways of Seeing: The First Medieval Islamic and Christian Depictions of Roderick, Last Visigothic King of Spain’, al-Masāq, 18 (2006), 115-28

Ann Christys, ‘How the Royal House of Witiza Survived the Islamic Conquest of Spain’, in Integration und Herrschaft: ethhnische Identitäten und soziale Organisation im Frühmittelalter, ed. by Walter Pohl and Maximilien Diesenberger (Wien: Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2002), pp. 233-46

Norman Roth, ‘The Jews and the Muslim Conquest of Spain’, Jewish Social Studies, 38 (1976), 145-58

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Week 4. The Northern Resistance and its Legends

Required Readings

Primary Sources

The Chronicle of Albelda, ‘Order of the Kings of the Goths’, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett from Chroniques asturiennes : (fin IXe siècle), avec édition critique, traduction et commentaire, ed. and trans. by Yves Bonnaz (Paris: C. N. R. S., 1987), pp. 22-5: translation on Minerva, the relevant extract for this week is cc. 30–38  

The Chronicle of Alfonso III, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett from Bonnaz, Chroniques asturiennes, as above, pp. 38-44: Rotense, years 714-37; if you like, read the introduction to understand what the Ad Sebastianum version is then compare that!   OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019)   

Secondary Writing (in suggested order)

Roger Collins, ‘Spain: The Northern Kingdoms and the Basques, 711-910’, in The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume 2: c. 700-c.900, ed. by Rosamond McKitterick (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), pp. 272-89 

Peter Linehan, History and the Historians of Medieval Spain (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993), pp. 95-127  OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Questions to Think About

Who is it that has left us the Christian traditions of the creation of the kingdom of Asturias-León? Why do our accounts differ so much? What is the rôle of the Goths in the narratives? And have we any hope of working out what really happened?

Additional Reading

Primary Source

Christians and Moors in Spain: vol. 3, Arabic sources (711‒1501), ed. by C. P. Melville and Ahmad ‘UbaydlÄ« (London: Aris & Phillips, 1992), pp. 18‒21 (no. 76)

Carolingian Chronicles: Royal Frankish Annals and Nithard's Histories, trans. by Bernhard Walter Scholz with Barbara Rogers (Ann Arbor: Michigan University Press, 1970), pp. 76-77 (annal for 798)

Secondary Writing (in reverse chronological order)

Trouble with the Texts

Julia Montenegro and Arcadio del Castillo, ‘The Alfonso II Document of 812, the Annales Portugalenses Veteres and the Continuity of the Visigothic Kingdom of Toledo as the Kingdom of Asturias’, Revue Belge de Philologie et d’Histoire, 87 (2009), 197-215 <http://www.persee.fr/doc/rbph_0035-0818_2009_num_87_2_7671> [last modified 25 May 2016 as of 9 July 2018]

David Hook, ‘From the Persians to Pelayo: Some Classical Complications in the Covadonga Complex’, in From Orosius to the Historia silense: Four Essays on the Late Antique and Early Medieval Historiography of the Iberian Peninsula, ed. by Hook (Bristol: HIPLAM, 2005), pp. 51-96

Israel Burshatin, ‘Narratives of Reconquest: Rodrigo, Pelayo, and the Saints’, in Saints and their Authors: Studies in Medieval Hispanic Hagiography in Honor of John K. Walsh, ed. by Jane E. Connolly, Alan Deyermond and Brian Dutton (Madison, WI: Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies, 1990), pp. 13-26

*Roger Collins, The Arab Conquest of Spain, 710-797 (Oxford: Blackwell, 1989), pp. 141-67

Society in the Post-Visigothic North

Iñaki Martín Viso, ‘Authority and Justice in the Formation of the Kingdom of Asturias-León’, al-MasāqISSN: 0950-3110, 25 (2017), 114‑32

Robert Portass, The Village World of Early Medieval Northern Spain: Local Community and the Land Market (Woodbridge: Boydell Press for the Royal Historical Society, 2017), pp. 1‒48 and 117‒32

Miguel Ángel de Blas Cortina, ‘Megaliths and Holy Places in the Genesis of the Kingdom of Asturias (North of Spain, AD 718-910)’, in The Lives of Prehistoric Monuments in Iron Age, Roman and Medieval Europe, ed. by Marta Díaz-Guardamino, Leonardo García Sanjuan and David Wheatley (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), pp. 205-24

Jonathan Jarrett, ‘Bovo Soldare: A Sacred Cow of Spanish Economic History Re-Evaluated’, in Early Medieval Monetary History: Studies in Memory of Mark Blackburn, ed. by Rory Naismith, Martin Allen and Elina Screen (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014), pp. 187–204

José Carlos Sánchez Pardo, ‘Power and Rural Landscapes in Early Medieval Galicia (400‒900 AD): Towards a Re-Incorporation of the Archaeology into the Historical Narrative’, Early Medieval Europe, 21.2 (2013), 140–68

Alfonso Vigil-Escalera Guirado and Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo, ‘Early Medieval Rural Societies in North-Western Spain: Archaeological Reflections of Fragmentation and Convergence’, in Scale and Scale Change in the Early Middle Ages: Exploring Landscape, Local Society, and the World Beyond, ed. by Julio Escalona and Andrew Reynolds (Turnhout: Brepols, 2011), pp. 33–60

*Luis Caballero Zoreda, ‘Observations on Historiography and Change from the Sixth to Tenth Centuries in the North and West of the Iberian Peninsula’, in The Archaeology of Iberia: The Dynamics of Change, ed. by Margarita Díaz-Andreu García (London: Routledge, 1997), pp. 235-64

Thomas F. Glick, Islamic and Christian Spain in the early Middle AgesISBN: 069105274: Comparative Perspectives on Social Cultural Formation (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1979) <http://libro.uca.edu/ics/emspain.htm> last modified 16 August 2000 as of 18 July 2016, pp. 19-50, or 2nd edn. (Leiden: Brill, 2005), pp. 3-41  

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Workshop 1. Source Gobbet Questions and How to Answer Them

The assessment for this course includes several short written source commentary questions, of the type known as ‘gobbets’. The 10% assessment of the module is a gobbets paper which will be done in class, and the examination will also contain one compulsory gobbets question. Both in-class paper and the examination question will be composed of nine short source extracts, on your choice of three of which you will comment. Each question is meant to take an hour, and so each commentary will take a notional twenty minutes. The skills for these commentaries are not quite the same as those for essays, and there is also a separate mark scheme (which can be found in Annex 1 of the Code of Practice on Assessment). As well as a practice paper set in the Week 8 seminar in the first semester, prior to your for-real assessment in Week 6 of the second semester, therefore, we will also have one workshop to discuss how these questions are best tackled, and. The workshop will be held outside the seminar hours, between the Week 5 and Week 6 seminars. Therefore, its instructions are included here.

This workshop will be based around a mock paper composed of a short extract from each of the four required primary readings from Weeks 2‑5, as well as 2 others chosen from the additional primary readings from those weeks. The paper will be distributed at the previous week’s seminar and will also be made available on Minerva as soon as it is created. Please come to the workshop having considered how you would answer each of the four gobbets from the required readings and having made short notes on what you would want to mention in each answer. We will compare notes, suggest strategies and then use these findings to look at the remaining two gobbets.

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Week 5. East to West: Migration and Secession in al-Andalus

Required Readings

Primary Source

The Chronicle of 754, trans. by Kenneth Baxter Wolf, in Conquerors and Chroniclers of Early Medieval Spain, ed. by Wolf, 2nd edn. (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1999), pp. 111-60 (145-56, chapters 80-91) 

Ali 'Izz al-Din Ibn al-Athir al-Jazari, Complete History, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett from Ibn el-Athir, Annales du Maghreb et de l’Espagne, trans. by Edmond Fagnan (Alger: Alphonse Jourdan, 1901) <http://нэб.рф/catalog/000199_000009_004487629/viewer/> (download link at top right of window) [last modified 31 December 2009 as of 23 July 2016], pp. 91-136: translation on Minerva 

Secondary Writing (in suggested order)

Roger Collins, Early Medieval Spain: Unity in Diversity, 400-1000, 2nd edn. (Basingstoke: MacMillan, 1995), pp. 181-221   Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Miguel Cruz Hernández, ‘The Social Structure of al-Andalus during the Muslim Occupation (711-55) and the Foundation of the Umayyad Monarchy’, in The Formation of al-Andalus, 1: History and Society, ed. by Manuela Marín (Aldershot: Ashgate, 1998), pp. 51-83 OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Questions to Think About

How far was al-Andalus under the control of the caliphs in Baghdad? How powerful a force was ethnicity in early al-Andalus? How was ‘Abd al-Rahmān I able so easily to take power in al-Andalus? How effective was the initial Umayyad rule in al-Andalus, and how far was that down to the rulers themselves?

Additional Reading

Primary Sources (of various kinds)

María Regueiro, Ralph Garcia-Bertrand, Karima Fadhloui-Zid, Joseph Álvarez and Rene J. Herrera, ‘From Arabia to Iberia: A Y Chromosome Perspective’, Gene, 564, (2015), 141–52

Collected Accounts, trans. David Peters as A History of Early al-Andalus: the Akhbār majmūʻa . A Study of the Unique Arabic Manuscript in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, with a Translation, Notes and Comments (London: Routledge, 2012), pp. 43-112

Muḥammad Ibn 'Umar Ibn 'Abd al-Azīz ibn Ibrāhīm ibn 'Isa ibn Mazāhim Ibn al-Qūtiyya, History of the Conquest of al-Andalus, trans. as Early Islamic Spain: The History of Ibn al-Qutiyah, trans. by David James (London: Routledge, 2011), pp. 67-133

‘A Muslim-Christian Treaty’, trans. by Olivia Remie Constable, in Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources, ed. by Olivia Remie Constable, 2nd ed. (Philadelphia, PA: Pennsylvania University Press, 2011), pp. 45-7

Christians and Moors in Spain: vol. 3, Arabic sources (711‒1501), ed. by C. P. Melville and Ahmad ‘UbaydlÄ« (London: Aris & Phillips, 1992), pp. 22‒23 (no. 77)

George C. Miles, The Coinage of the Umayyads of Spain (New York City, NY: The American Numismatic Society, 1950)

Secondary Writing (in reverse chronological order)

Events: Governors to Umayyads

Pierre Guichard, From the Arab Conquest to the Reconquest: The Splendour and Fragility of Al-Andalus (Granada: Fundación el Legado Andalusí, 2006), pp. 47-65

Hugh Kennedy, Muslim Spain and Portugal: A Political History of al-Andalus (London: Longman, 1998), pp. 30-65 

*María Jesús Viguera Molins, ‘The Muslim Settlement of Spania/al-Andalus’, Eduardo Manzano Moreno, ‘The Settlement of the Syrian junds in al-Andalus’, and Pierre Guichard, ‘The Population of the Region of Valencia during the First Two Centuries of Muslim Domination’, all in Marín, Formation of al-Andalus, 1, as above, pp. 15‒38, pp. 85‒114 and pp. 129‒81, respectively

Roger Collins, The Arab Conquest of Spain, 710-797 (Oxford: Blackwell, 1989), pp. 81-140 

Hugh Kennedy, The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates: The Islamic Near East from the Sixth to the Eleventh Century, 2nd edn. (London: Longman, 2004), pp. 123-55: on the Middle East 

‘Abdulwāhid DhanÅ«n Tāha, The Muslim Conquest and Settlement of North Africa and Spain (London: Routledge, 1989), pp. 183-233: much more detailed than most! Ask yourself why...

Miguel Barceló Perello, ‘On Coins in al-Andalus during the Umayyad Emirate (138-300)’, Numismatica e antichità classica, 8 (1979), 313-24: for help with Miles, if used OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Ethnicity: Arabs, Berbers and Locals

*Jessica A. Coope, ‘Marriage, Kinship, and Islamic Law in Al-Andalus: Reflections on Pierre Guichard's Al-Andalus’, al-Masāq, 20 (2008), 161-78

María Isabel Fierro Bello, ‘Genealogies of Power in Al-Andalus: Politics, Religion and Ethnicity during the Second/Eighth-Fifth/Eleventh Centuries’, Annales Islamologiques, 42 (2008), 29-55 <http://www.ifao.egnet.net/anisl/42/03/> [last modified 12 November 2017 as of 9 July 2018]

Pierre Guichard, ‘The Social History of Muslim Spain from the Conquest to the End of the Almohad Régime (Early 2nd/8th – Early 7th/13th Centuries)’, in The Legacy of Muslim Spain, ed. by Salma K. Jayyusi (Leiden: E. J. Brill 1992), pp. 679-708 (681-93)

Effects: Changes in Society and Settlement

Javier Martínez Jiménez, ‘The Rural Hinterland of the Visigothic Capitals of Toledo and Recopolis, between the Years 400‒800 CE’, in Authority and Control in the Countryside, from Antiquity to Islam in the Mediterranean and Near East (Sixth‒Tenth Century), ed. by Alain Delattre, Marie Legendre, and Petra M. Sijpesteijn (Leiden: Brill, 2019), pp. 97–127

Sonia Gutiérrez Lloret, ‘Early al-Andalus: an Archaeological Approach to the Process of Islamization in the Iberian Peninsula (7th to 10th centuries)’, in New Directions in Early Medieval European Archaeology: Spain and Italy Compared. Essays for Riccardo FrancovichISBN: 9782503565200; 2503565, ed. by Saurio Gelichi and Richard Hodges (Turnhout: Brepols, 2015), pp. 43‑86

José Cristobal Carvajal López, Julio M. Román Punzón, Miguel Jiménez Puertas and Javier Martínez Jiménez, ‘When the East Came to the West: The Seventh Century in the Vega of Granada (South-East Spain): Visigoths, Byzantines and Muslims’, in The Long Seventh Century: Continuity and Discontinuity in an Age of TransitionISBN: 9783034317955, ed. by Alessandro Gnasso (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), pp. 135‑62

David Peterson, ‘The Men of Wavering Faith: On the Origins of Arabic Personal and Place Names in the Duero Basin’, Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies, 3.2 (2011), 219–46

*Richard Hitchcock, Muslim Spain Reconsidered: From 711 to 1502 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2014), pp. 1-39

*Richard Hitchcock, Mozarabs in Medieval and Early Modern Spain: Identities and Influences (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008), pp. 7‒23

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Week 6. The Frankish Intervention

Required Readings

Primary Sources

Einhard, Life of Charles, trans. in Two Lives of Charlemagne: Einhard and Notker the Stammerer, ed. by David Ganz (London: Penguin, 2009), pp. 17-44 (21-31, chapters 4-17)  OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Ermold the Black, ‘In Praise of Louis’, trans. by Thomas F. X. Noble, in Charlemagne and Louis the Pious: The Lives by Einhard, Notker, Ermoldus, Thegan, and the Astronomer, ed. by Noble (Philadelphia, PA: Pennsylvania University Press, 2009), pp. 127-86 (130-41, Book I)  OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Secondary Writing (in suggested order)

Cullen J. Chandler, ‘Carolingian Catalonia: The Spanish March, 778–988’, The Heroic Age, 17 (2017) <http://www.heroicage.org/issues/17/chandler.php> [accessed 25 August 2018]  

Thomas F. X. Noble, ‘Louis the Pious and the Frontiers of the Frankish Realm’, in Charlemagne's Heir: New Perspectives on the Reign of Louis the Pious (814-840), ed. by Peter Godman and Roger Collins (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990), pp. 333-47   OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (KR 19/12/2018) 

Questions to Think About

What were the Carolingian rulers trying to achieve by intervening over the Pyrenees? Why do the sources differ on who was responsible? What difference did their intervention make for the populations whose control they assumed? And how long did that difference last?

Additional Reading

Primary Sources

‘Constitution for the Hispani ’, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett, from Catalunya Carolíngia II: els diplomes carolingis a Catalunya, ed. by Ramon d’Abadal i de Vinyals (Barcelona: Institute d’Estudis Catalans, 1926-50, repr. 2007), appendix III: on Minerva

The Life of Emperor Louis, trans. in Noble, Charlemagne and Louis the Pious, as above, pp. 226-303 (esp. 235-62)

Carolingian Chronicles: Royal Frankish Annals and Nithard's Histories, trans. by Bernhard Walter Scholz with Barbara Rogers (Ann Arbor: Michigan University Press, 1970), pp. 55-125 (years 777-829): look for Spanish events but notice the wider context too

Secondary Writing (in reverse chronological order)

*Roger Collins, Caliphs and Kings: Spain, 796-103 (Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2012), pp. 205-37

Frank Riess, ‘From Aachen to al-Andalus: The Journey of Deacon Bodo (823–76)’, Early Medieval Europe, 13.2 (2005), 131–57: on a fascinating diplomatic and religious episode

Abdurrahman Ali el-Hajji, ‘Political Relations between the Andalusian Rebels and Christian Spain during the Umayyad Period (A.H. 138-366/a.d. 755-976)’, The Islamic Quarterly, 10 (1966), 84-94

The Carolingians, their Empire and their Motives

Thomas Freudenhammer, ‘Rafica: Early Medieval Caravan Trade between the West Frankish Kingdom and al-Andalus’, Vierteljahrschrift für Sozial- und Wirtschaftsgeschichte, 105.3 (2018), 391–406 OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Samuel Ottewill-Soulsby, ‘“Those Same Cursed Saracens”: Charlemagne’s Campaigns in the Iberian Peninsula as Religious Warfare’, Journal of Medieval History, 42.4 (2016), 405–28

Daniel G. König, ‘Charlemagne’s ›Jihād‹ Revisited: Debating the Islamic Contribution to an Epochal Change in the History of Christianization’, Medieval Worlds, 3 (2016), 3–40; contra Hen, below

*Jonathan P. Conant, ‘Louis the Pious and the Contours of Empire’, Early Medieval Europe, 22 (2014), 336-60

Peter C. M. Hoppenbrouwers, ‘ Leges nationum and Ethnic Personality of Law in Charlemagne’s Empire’, in Law and Empire: Ideas, Practices, Actors, ed. by Jeroen Duindam, Jill Harries, Caroline Humfress and Nimrod Hurvitz (Leiden: Brill, 2013), pp. 251-74; cf. Chandler, ‘Court and Counts’, below

Yitzhak Hen, ‘Charlemagne’s Jihad’, Viator, 37 (2006), 33–51; cf. König and Ottewill-Soulsby above!

Cullen J. Chandler, ‘Heresy and Empire: The Role of the Adoptionist Controversy in Charlemagne’s Conquest of the Spanish March’, International History Review, 24.3 (2002), 505–27

*Julia M. H. Smith, ‘"Fines Imperii”: The Marches’, in The New Cambridge Medieval History, Vol. 2, c. 700- c. 900, ed. by Rosamond McKitterick (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), pp. 169-89

Catalonia specifically

Jonathan Jarrett, ‘Ceremony, Charters and Social Memory: Property Transfer Ritual in Early Medieval Catalonia’, Social History, 44.3 (2019), 275–95

Cullen J. Chandler, Carolingian Catalonia: Politics, Culture, and Identity in an Imperial Province, 778–987 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019): brand new!

Jonathan Jarrett, ‘Comparing the Earliest Documentary Culture in Carolingian Catalonia’, in Problems and Possibilities of Early Medieval Charters, ed. by Jonathan Jarrett and Allan Scott McKinley (Turnhout: Brepols, 2013), pp. 89-128: N. B. charts printed wrongly

Jonathan Jarrett, ‘Settling the Kings’ Lands: Aprisio in Catalonia in Perspective’, Early Medieval Europe, 18 (2010), 320-41: a response to Chandler, ‘Court and Counts’, below

Cullen Chandler, ‘Between Court and Counts: Carolingian Catalonia and the Aprisio Grant, 778-897’, Early Medieval Europe, 11 (2002), 19-44; cf. Jarrett, ‘Settling the Kings’ Lands’, and Hoppenbrouwers, both above

*Roger Collins, ‘Charles the Bald and Wifred the Hairy’, in Charles the Bald: Court and Kingdom. Papers Based on a Colloquium held in London in April 1979, ed. by Margaret Gibson, Janet L. Nelson and David Ganz (Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, 1981), pp. 169-89, repr. in Charles the Bald: Court and Kingdom, ed. by Gibson and Nelson (Aldershot: Ashgate, 1990), pp. 169-88, and in Collins, Law, Culture and Regionalism in Early Medieval Spain (Aldershot: Ashgate, 1992), chapter XIII

The Basque Country and Aragón specifically

Juan José Larrea and Jesús Lorenzo, ‘Barbarians of Dâr al-Islâm: The Upper March of al-Andalus and the Pyrenees in the Eighth and Ninth Centuries’, in La Transgiordania Nei Secoli XII‒XIII e Le ‘Frontiere’ Del Mediterraneo Medievale. Trans-Jordan in the 12th and 13th Centuries and the ‘Frontiers’ of the Medieval Mediterranean, ed. by Guido Vannini and Michele Nucciotti (Oxford: Archaeopress, 2012), pp. 277–88

*Roger Collins, The Basques, 2nd edn. (Oxford: Blackwell, 1990), pp. 99-132

Thomas Noel Bisson, The Medieval Crown of Aragon: A Short History (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986), pp. 5-30

Roger Collins, ‘The Basques in Aquitaine and Navarre: Problems of Frontier Government’, in War and Society in the Middle Ages: Essays in Honor of J. O. Prestwich, ed. by John Gillingham and James Holt (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984), pp. 3-17, repr. in Collins, Law, Culture and Regionalism, as above, chapter VIII

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Dissertation Workshop 2: Reviewing the Literature and the Project Proposal Form

In the course of Week 6 we will schedule a 1-hour workshop where we can discuss how to find out what’s been written on your chosen subject, how to get at it once you’ve found it and how to approach it so to identify your own ‘research gap’. A lot of this will be your tutor explaining library arcana to you and demystifying the proposal form, but please try before the workshop to write down what the key theme that interests you in your prospective topic is, who has written about it that you so far know about, and what it is that you feel they haven’t explained to you!

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Week 7. Conversion, Coercion and Emigration

Note that this seminar will be partly taken up by the Unassessed Gobbets Exercise.

Required Readings

Primary Sources

Samson of Córdoba, Apology against the Perfidious, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett from Corpus Scriptorum Mvzarabicorum, ed. by Juan Gil, 2 vols (Madrid: Instituto Antonio de Nebrija, 1973), II, pp. 505-658 (pp. 547-55, II.Præfatio): on Minerva 

Eulogius of Córdoba, A Record of the Saints, partially trans. by Colin Smith as ‘The Martyrdom of Isaac de Tábanos (851)’, in Christians and Moors in Spain. Vol. 1, 711-1150, ed. by Colin Smith (Warminster: Aris and Phillips, 1988), pp. 42-7 (no. 10)  

Secondary Writing (in suggested order)

Kenneth Baxter Wolf, ‘Eulogius of Córdoba and His Understanding of Islam’ <http://www.academia.edu/20312136/Eulogius_of_Córdoba_and_His_Understanding_of_Islam> [last modified 16 January 2016 as of 9 July 2018]      

Richard Fletcher, Moorish Spain (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1992), pp. 35-51   OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Questions to Think About

What provoked the sudden outburst of martyrdoms in mid-ninth-century Córdoba? Did Eulogius represent a wider feeling or were he and his fellows a lunatic fringe? How, in general, were Christians treated in 9th-century al-Andalus, and was Córdoba typical in this respect?

Additional Reading

Primary Sources

*The Eulogius Corpus, trans. by Kenneth Baxter Wolf (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2019): invaluable new assemblage of the Life of Eulogius and all Eulogius’s own writings

Collected Accounts, trans. David Peters as A History of Early al-Andalus: the Akhbār majmūʻa. A Study of the Unique Arabic Manuscript in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, with a Translation, Notes and Comments (London: Routledge, 2012), pp. 113-33

*Christians and Moors in Spain: vol. 3, Arabic sources (711‒1501), ed. by C. P. Melville and Ahmad ‘UbaydlÄ« (London: Aris & Phillips, 1992), pp. 28‒31 (no. 79)

Secondary Writing (in reverse chronological order)

General

Roger Collins, Caliphs and Kings: Spain, 796-1031 (Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2012), pp. 83-120

Thomas F. Glick, Islamic and Christian Spain in the Early Middle Ages: Comparative Perspectives on Social Cultural Formation (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1979) <http://libro.uca.edu/ics/emspain.htm> [last modified 16 August 2000 as of 18 July 2016], pp. 165-93, or 2nd edn. (Leiden: Brill, 2005), pp. 184-219    

The Martyr Movement

Adriano Duque, ‘Claiming Martyrdom in the Episode of The Martyrs of Córdoba’, Collectanea Christiana Orientalia, 8 (2011), 23-48 <http://www.uco.es/investiga/grupos/hum380/collectanea/sites/default/files/8_1.pdf> [last modified 21 February 2014 as of 29 July 2016]

Ann Christys, Christians in al-Andalus, 711-1000 (London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 52-107

*Jessica A. Coope, The Martyrs of Córdoba: Community and Family Conflict in an Age of Mass Conversion (Lincoln, NB: University of Nebraska Press, 1995)

Kenneth Baxter Wolf, Christian Martyrs in Muslim Spain (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988) <http://libro.uca.edu/martyrs/martyrs.htm> [last modified 16 August 2000 as of 9 July 2018]

Conversion

Cristina de la Puente, ‘Free Fathers, Slave Mothers and Their Children : A Contribution to the Study of Family Structures in al-Andalus’, Imago Temporis: Medium Aevum, 7 (2013), 27–44 <https://www.raco.cat/index.php/ImagoTemporis/article/view/292948> [accessed 30 October 2018]

David J. Wasserstein, ‘Where Have All the Converts Gone? Difficulties in the Study of Conversion to Islam in al-Andalus’, al-Qaná¹­ara, 33.2 (2012), 325–42

*Alwyn Harrison, ‘Behind the Curve: Bulliet and Conversion to Islam in al-Andalus Revisited’, al-Masāq, 24.1 (2012), 35–51

Jessica A. Coope, ‘Religious and Cultural Conversion to Islam in Ninth-Century Umayyad Córdoba’, Journal of World History, 4 (1993), 47-68

Christianity and Tolerance in al-Andalus in the Ninth Century

Ann Christys, ‘The Qur’ān as History for Muslims and Christians in al-Andalus’, Journal of Transcultural Medieval Studies, 5.1 (2018), 55–73 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Richard Hitchcock, ‘Christian-Muslim Understanding(s) in Medieval Spain’, Hispanic Research Journal, 9.4 (2008), 314–25

Ann R. Christys, ‘Muslims and Christians in Umayyad Cordoba: The Formation of a Tolerant Society? ’, Rivista di Storia del Cristianesimo, 4 (2007), 29-48 OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Kenneth Baxter Wolf, ‘Muhammad as Antichrist in Ninth-Century Cordoba’, in Christians, Muslims, and Jews in Medieval and Early Modern Spain: Interaction and Cultural Change, ed. by Mark D. Meyerson and Edward D. English, (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1999), pp. 3-19

Ann Christys, ‘The “History” of Ibn Habib and Ethnogenesis in al-Andalus’, in The Construction of Communities in the Early Middle Ages, ed. by Richard Corradini, Maximilian Diesenberger and Helmut Reimitz (Leiden: Brill, 2003), pp. 323‒50

Janina M. Safran, ‘Identity and Differentiation in Ninth-Century al-Andalus’, Speculum, 76 (2001), 573-98

Hanna E. Kassis, ‘Some Aspects of the Legal Position of Christians under Maliki Jurisprudence in al-Andalus’, in Actes du 5e Congrès international d’études arabes chrétiennes, Lund, Août, 1996, ed. by Samir Kalil Samir (Kaslik: Faculté Pontificale de Théologie de l’USEK, 1999), i, 113–28 <http://documents.irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/35314> [accessed 31 October 2018]

Kenneth Baxter Wolf, ‘Muhammad as Antichrist in Ninth-Century Cordoba’, in Medieval and Early Modern Spain: Interaction and Cultural Change, ed. by Mark D. Meyerson and Edward D. English, (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1999), pp. 3‒19

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Week 8. Reconquista Part 0: King Alfonso III and his Chroniclers

Required Readings

Primary Source

‘The Prophetic Chronicle’, transl. by Kenneth Baxter Wolf, Medieval Texts in Translation <https://sites.google.com/site/canilup/chronica_prophetica> [last modified 2008 as of 9 July 2018]  

The Chronicle of Alfonso III, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett from Chroniques asturiennes, Chroniques Asturiennes (fin IXe siècle), avec édition critique, traduction et commentaire, ed. and trans. by Yves Bonnaz (Paris: C. N. R. S., 1987), pp. 32–5 (Froila to the end): translation on Minerva, compare the two versions 

Secondary Writing (in suggested order)

Roger Collins, Caliphs and Kings: Spain, 796-1031: (Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2012), pp. 50-82  

Julio Escalona, ‘Family Memories: Inventing Alfonso I of Asturias’, in Building Legitimacy: Political Discourses and Forms of Legitimation in Medieval Societies, ed. by María Isabel Alfonso Antón, Julio Escalona Monge and Hugh Kennedy (Leiden: Brill, 2004), pp. 223-62 

Questions to Think About

How seriously were notions of reconquest entertained at Alfonso III’s court, and how extensive were their ambitions? What prevented them coming about? Was this point of view held by anyone other than the chroniclers? And how close can we get to the politics of the time when the court itself created so many of our sources?

Additional Reading

Primary Sources

Muḥammad Ibn 'Umar Ibn 'Abd al-Azīz ibn Ibrāhīm ibn 'Isa ibn Mazāhim Ibn al-Qūtiyya, History of the Conquest of al-Andalus, trans. as Early Islamic Spain: The History of Ibn al-Qutiyah, trans. by David James (London: Routledge, 2011), pp. 109-39

*The Silos History, trans. as ‘The Historia Silense ’, in The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Spanish Reconquest, trans. by Simon Barton and Richard Fletcher (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000), pp. 9-64 (24-36, chapters 1-68)

The Art of Medieval Spain, A. D. 500-1200, ed. by John P. O’Neill, Kathleen Howard and Ann M. Lucke (New York City, NY: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1993) <https://www.metmuseum.org/art/metpublications/The_Art_of_Medieval_Spain_AD_500_1200> [last modified 1st June 2012 as of 9 July 2018], pp. 113-63

Secondary Writing (in reverse chronological order)

Political Context, North and South

Iñaki Martín Viso, ‘Authority and Justice in the Formation of the Kingdom of Asturias-León’, al-MasāqISSN: 0950-3110, 25 (2017), 114‑32

Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo, ‘Early and High Medieval “Incastellamento” in Northern Iberia: Fortified Settlements in the Basque Country and Upper Ebro Valley (9th–12th Centuries)’, in Fortified Settlements in Early Medieval Europe: Defended Communities of the 8th‒10th Centuries, ed. by Neil Christie and Hajnalka Herold (Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2016), pp. 192–204

Richard Hitchcock, ‘Reflections on the Frontier in Early Medieval Iberia’, in The Making of Medieval History, ed. by G. A. Loud and Martial Staub (Woodbridge: York Medieval Press, 2017), pp. 155–96

Álvaro Carvajal Castro, ‘The Monarchy and the Elites in Early Medieval León (Ninth-Eleventh Centuries)’, Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies, 7 (2015), 232-48

Rob Portass, ‘All Quiet on the Western Front? Royal Politics in Galicia from c.  800 to c. 950’, Early Medieval Europe, 21 (2013), 283-306

Roberto Marín-Guzmán, ‘Political Turmoil in Al-Andalus in the Time of the AmÄ«r ‘Abd Allah (888–912): Study of the Revolt of DaysÅ«m Ibn Isḣāq, Lord of Murcia and Lorca and the Role of ‘Umar Ibn ḢafsÅ«n’, The Muslim World, 96 (2006), 145-74

David G. Pattinson, ‘The Reign of Ordoño II in a New Chronicle Manuscript: More Light on the Alphonsine Borrador’, Medium aevum, 60 (1991), 268-73

Society in the Christian North

Robert Portass, The Village World of Early Medieval Northern Spain: Local Community and the Land Market (Woodbridge: Boydell Press for the Royal Historical Society, 2017)

Robert Portass, ‘The Middling Sort at Court in Early Medieval Christian Iberia’, al-Masāq, 29.2 (2017), 99–113

Wendy Davies, ‘Notions of Wealth in the Charters of Ninth- and Tenth-Century Christian Iberia’, in Les élites et la richesse au haut moyen âge, ed. by Jean-Pierre Devroey, Laurent Feller, and Régine Le Jan (Turnhout: Brepols, 2010), pp. 265–84

Wendy Davies, ‘Where Are the Parishes? Where Are the Minsters? The Organization of the Spanish Church in the Tenth Century’, in England and the Continent in the Tenth Century: Studies in Honour of Wilhelm Levison (1876‒1947), ed. by David Rollason, Conrad Leyser, and Hannah Williams (Turnhout: Brepols, 2010), pp. 379–97

Richard Hitchcock, Mozarabs in Medieval and Early Modern Spain: Identities and Influences (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008), pp. 53-68

Ideas of Reconquest, at Alfonso's Court and Afterwards

Ksenia Bonch Reeves, ‘Visigothic Law and the Adversarial Realm in the Kingdom of Asturias: Muslims as the New Jews’, Visigothic Symposium, 1 (2016), 95–109

Joseph F. O’Callaghan, Reconquest and Crusade in Medieval Spain (Philadelphia, PA: Pennsylvania University Press, 2003), pp. 1-22

*Eduardo Manzano Moreno, ‘The Creation of a Medieval Frontier: Islam and Christianity in the Iberian Peninsula, Eighth to Twelfth Centuries’, Frontiers in Question: Eurasian Borderlands, 700-1700, ed. by Naomi Standen and Daniel Power (London: Palgrave MacMillan, 1999), pp. 32-52

*Peter Linehan, History and the Historians of Medieval Spain (Oxford: Clarendon, 1993), pp. 95-170

Peter Linehan, ‘Religion, Nationalism and National Identity in Medieval Spain’, in Religion and National Identity, ed. Stephen Mews (= Studies in Church History, 18 (1982)), 161-99, repr. in Linehan, Spanish Church and Society, 1150-1300 (London: Variorum, 1983), chapter I

Vicente Cantarino, ‘The Spanish Reconquest: A Cluniac Holy War Against Islam?’, in Islam and the Medieval West: Aspects of Intercultural Relations. Papers Presented at the Ninth Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton, ed. by Khalil I. Semaan (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1980), pp. 82-109

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Week 9. Convivencia and Caliphs

Required Readings

Primary Sources

Samuel Magal, ‘Moorish Architecture in Spain’, The Magal Collection <https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=38kmLyWc2iw> [last modified 26 November 2011 as of 9 July 2018]  

Anonymous Chronicle of ‘Abd al-Rahmān al-Nasir, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett from Una Crónica anónima de Abd Al-Rahman III Al-Nasir, ed. and trans. by Évariste Lévi-Provençal and Emilio García Gómez (Madrid: Maestre, 1950), pp. 126-55 (chapters 28-60): on Minerva 

Secondary Writing (in suggested order)

Mark T. Abate, ‘Islamic Spain: Al-Andalus and the Three Cultures’, in Handbook of Medieval Culture: Fundamental Aspects and Conditions of the European Middle Ages ISBN: 9783110377606 (set); 3110377608 (set); 9783110266597 (v. 1); 3110266598 (v. 1); 9783110266597 (epub); 9783110377569 (v. 2); 311037756X (v. 2); 9783110377637 (epub); 9783110377576 (v. 3); 3110377578 (v. 3); 9783110392920 (epub); 9783110377613 (pdf); 9783110267310; 9783110267303, ed. by Albrecht Classen, 3 vols (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2015), II, pp. 740‑71        

Miquel Barceló, ‘The Manifest Caliph: Umayyad Ceremony in Córdoba, or, The Staging of Power’, in The Formation of al-Andalus, 1: History and Society, ed. by Manuela Marín (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008), pp. 425-55 

Questions to Think About

How true is the picture of Muslim Spain as a haven of tolerance for cultural and religious diversity? Did this change over time? What difference to these relations did the development of a caliphate in Spain make? And how did the new caliphate achieve such splendour and power so quickly?

Additional Reading

Primary Sources

Collected Accounts, trans. David Peters as A History of Early al-Andalus: the Akhbār majmūʻa . A Study of the Unique Arabic Manuscript in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, with a Translation, Notes and Comments (London: Routledge, 2012), pp. 134-42

Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources, ed. by Olivia Remie Constable, 1st ed. (Philadelphia, PA: Pennsylvania University Press, 1997), pp. 56-74 (nos 13 & 14)

Al-Andalus: The Art of Islamic Spain, ed. by Jerrilynn D. Dodds (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1992) <https://www.metmuseum.org/art/metpublications/Al_Andalus_The_Art_of_Islamic_Spain> [last modified 24 December 2016 as of 24 December 2016], pp. 3‑74

Christians and Moors in Spain: vol. 3, Arabic sources (711‒1501), ed. by C. P. Melville and Ahmad ‘UbaydlÄ« (London: Aris & Phillips, 1992), pp. 38‒55 (nos 81‒83)

Politics: The fitna and the Caliphate

*Roger Collins, Caliphs and Kings: Spain, 796-1031 (Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2012), pp. 121-37 and 166-204

Maribel Fierro, ʻAbd al-Rahmān III: The First Cordoban Caliph (Oxford: Oneworld, 2005): handy

Janina M. Safran, The Second Umayyad Caliphate: The Articulation of Caliphal Legitimacy in al-Andalus (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000)

*Hugh Kennedy, Muslim Spain and Portugal: A Political History of al-Andalus (London: Longman, 1998), pp. 63-108

Córdoba and Culture

David Wasserstein, ‘The Library of al-Hakam II al-Mustansir and the Culture of Islamic Spain’, in Education and Learning in the Early Islamic WorldISBN: 0860787176 (hbk.); 9780860787174 (hbk.), ed. by Claude Gilliot (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2012), pp. 375‑82

Antonio Vallejo Triano, ‘Madinat al-Zahra': Transformation of a Caliphal City’, and Cynthia S. Robinson, ‘Love in the Time of Fitna: “Courtliness” and the “Pamplona” Casket’, in Revisiting al-Andalus: Perspectives on the Material Culture of Islamic Iberia and Beyond, ed. by Glaire D. Anderson (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2007), pp. 3-26 and pp. 99-114

Nuha N. N. Khoury, ‘The Meaning of the Great Mosque of Cordoba in the Tenth Century’, MuqarnasISSN: 0732-229, 13 (1996), 80–98

Convivencia: Jews, Muslims, and Christians in Medieval Spain, ed. by Vivian B. Mann, Thomas F. Glick and Jerrilyn D. Dodds (New York City, NY: G. Braziller, 1992)

The Debate over Tolerance

Dario Fernández-Morera, The Myth of the Andalusian Paradise: Muslims, Christians, and Jews under Islamic Rule in Medieval Spain ISBN: 9781504034692 (e-book) (Wilmington, DW: ISI Books, 2016): the case against! Cf. Menocal

Mark T. Abate, ‘Convivencia: Conquest and Coexistence in Medieval Spain’, in Classen, Handbook of Medieval CultureISBN: 9783110377606 (set); 3110377608 (set); 9783110266597 (v. 1); 3110266598 (v. 1); 9783110266597 (epub); 9783110377569 (v. 2); 311037756X (v. 2); 9783110377637 (epub); 9783110377576 (v. 3); 3110377578 (v. 3); 9783110392920 (epub); 9783110377613 (pdf); 9783110267310; 9783110267303, as above, I, pp. 232‑77

Janina M. Safran, Defining Boundaries in al-Andalus: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Islamic Iberia (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2015)

Revisiting Convivencia in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia, ed. by Connie L. Scarborough (Newark, DL: Juan de la Cuesta, 2014)

*Anna Akasoy, ‘Convivencia and its Discontents: Interfaith Life in al-Andalus’, International Journal of Middle East Studies, 42.3 (2010), 489–99

*Maya Soifer Irish, ‘Beyond "Convivencia": Critical Reflections on the Historiography of Interfaith Relations in Christian Spain’, Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies, 1 (2009), 19-35

Denise K. Filios, ‘Expulsion from Paradise: Exiled Intellectuals and Andalusi Tolerance’, in In the Light of Medieval Spain: Islam, the West, and the Relevance of the Past, ed. by Simon R. Doubleday and David Coleman (New York City, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), pp. 91–113

John W. Fox, Nada Mourtada-Sabbah & Sulayman N. Khalaf, ‘Ethnography and the Culture of Tolerance in al-Andalus’, Harvard Middle Eastern and Islamic Review, 7 (2006), 146-71 OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

*María Rosa Menocal, The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain (New York City: Little, Brown & Co., 2002): the case for

The Caliphate and Outsiders

Jonathan Jarrett, ‘Nests of Pirates? “Islandness” in the Balearic Islands and La-Garde-Freinet’, al-Masāq, 31.2 (2019), 196–222

Mohammad Ballan, ‘Fraxinetum: An Islamic Frontier State in Tenth-Century Provence’, Comitatus, 41 (2010), 23–76

Amira K. Bennison, ‘The Peoples of the North in the Eyes of the Muslims of Umayyad al-Andalus (711–1031)’, Journal of Global History, 2 (2007), 157-74

Abdurrahman Ali El-Hajji, Andalusian Diplomatic Relations with Western Europe during the Umayyad period (A.H. 138 - 366/A.D. 755 - 976): An Historical Survey (Beirut: Dar al-Ishad, 1970)

Samuel M. Stern, ‘Letter of the Byzantine Emperor to the Court of the Spanish Umayyad Caliph al-Hakam’, al-Andalus, 26 (1961), 37-42

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Week 10. Gold, Slaves and Trade

Required Readings

Primary Source

Tawfiq Ibrahim and Sebastian Gasparío, Coins of al-Andalus Tonegawa Collection <http://www.andalustonegawa.50g.com/index.htm> [last modified 11 November 2017 as of 26 July 2018]: a huge site, but try and get a sense of what changed about the coin that people would have known from era and ruler to era and ruler; don’t try and view every single coin though! 

Secondary Writing (in suggested order)

Miquel Crusafont, Anna M. Balaguer and Philip Grierson, Medieval European Coinage, with a Catalogue of the Coins in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, 6: The Iberian Peninsula (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), pp. 54–65  OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Olivia Remie Constable, ‘Muslim Spain and Mediterranean Slavery: The Medieval Slave Trade as an Aspect of Muslim-Christian Relations’, in Christendom and its Discontents: Exclusion, Persecution, and Rebellion, 1000-1500ISBN: 0521471834, ed. by Scott L. Waugh and Peter Diehl (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), pp. 264‑84  OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 24/09/2019) 

Questions to Think About

Clearly the power and splendour of the Caliphate rested on a considerable fiscal base. How was this resource generated and collected, and where did it come from in the first place? Why was ‘Abd al-Rahmān III able to issue the only gold coinage struck in Europe in his time? And how much part did the other principalities of the peninsula get to play in this prosperity?

Additional Reading

Primary Sources

Almudena Ariza Armada, ‘The Coinage of al-Andalus’, Shedet, 4 (2017), 68–90 <https://www.researchgate.net/publication/323446765_The_Coinage_of_al-Andalus> [accessed 6 December 2018]

Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources, ed. by Olivia Remie Constable, 1st ed. (Philadelphia, PA: Pennsylvania University Press, 1997), pp. 73‑4 (no. 14)

George C. Miles, The Coinage of the Umayyads of Spain, 2 vols (New York City, NY: American Numismatic Society, 1960): the standard English-language reference catalogue, for now

Secondary Writing (in reverse chronological order)

Magdalena Valor Piechotta, ‘Trade, Transport and Travel in Al-Andalus’, in The Archaeology of Medieval Spain, 1100-1500ISBN: 1781792526 (paperback); 9781781792520 (paperback), ed. by Magdalena Valor Piechotta and José Avelino Gutiérrez González (Sheffield: Equinox, 2014), pp. 117‑33

Florin Curta, ‘Markets in Tenth-Century al-Andalus and Volga Bulgharia: Contrasting Views of Trade in Muslim Europe’, al-MasāqISSN: 0950-3110, 25 (2013), 305‑30

Francisco Franco-Sánchez, ‘The Andalusian Economy in Times of Almanzor: Administrative Theory and Economic Reality through Juridical and Geographic Sources’, Imago Temporis: Medium Aevum, 2 (2008), pp. 83‑112 <http://www.raco.cat/index.php/ImagoTemporis/article/view/207048> [last modified 16 January 2012 as of 20 October 2016]

Hugh Kennedy, ‘From Antiquity to Islam in the Cities of al-Andalus and al-Mashriq’, in Genèse de la ville islamique en al-Andalus et au Maghreb occidental, ed. by Patrice Cressier and Mercedes García-Arenal (Madrid: Casa de Velázquez, 1998): pp. 53‑64, repr. in Kennedy, The Byzantine and Early Islamic Near East (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006), chapter V

Olivia Remie Constable, Trade and Traders in Muslim Spain: The Commercial Realignment of the Iberian Peninsula, 900‒1500 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994) <https://archive.org/details/Tokyo.Elektro_20170811> [accessed 20 July 2019]

*Pedro Chalmeta, ‘An Approximate Picture of the Economy of al-Andalus’, in The Legacy of Muslim SpainISBN: 9004095993, ed. by Salma Khadra Jayyusi (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1992), pp. 741‑58: handle with care!

Avraham Grossman, ‘The Economic and Social Background of Hostile Attitudes toward the Jews in the Ninth and Tenth Century Muslim Caliphate’, in Antisemitism through the Ages, ed. by Shmuel Almog, trans. by Nathan H. Reisner (New York: Pergamon Press, 1988), pp. 171–87

Slaves

Adam Gaiser, ‘Slaves and Silver Across the Strait of Gibraltar: Politics and Trade between Umayyad Iberia and Khārijite North Africa’, in Spanning the Strait: Studies in Unity in the Western Mediterranean ISBN: 9789004256637 (paperback : acid-free paper); 9004256636 (paperback : acid-free paper); 9789004256644 (e-book), ed. by Yuen-Gen Liang, Abigail Krasner Balbale, Andrew Devereux and Camillo Gómez-Rivas (Leiden: Brill, 2013), pp. 41‑70

Sato Kentaro, ‘Slave Elites and the Saqaliba in al-Andalus in the Umayyad Period’, in Slave Elites in the Middle East and Africa: A Comparative StudyISBN: 0710306601; 9780710306609, ed. by Miura Toru and John Edward Phillips (London: Kegan Paul International, 2000), pp. 25–40

Money and the Fisc

Elizabeth Savage and Adon Gordus, ‘Dirhams for the Empire’, in Genèse de la ville islamique, as above, pp. 377‑402   

*Problems of Medieval Coinage in the Iberian Area, 3: A Symposium held by the Sociedade Numismática Scalabitana and the Instituto de Sintra on 4–8 October, 1988, ed. by Mario Gomes Marques and David Michael Metcalf (Santarém: Asociación Numismática Scalabitana, 1988): Miguel Barceló Perelló, ‘Coins from Afar? New Evidence on Coin Production and Fiscal Administrative Practice in the Late Umayyad Caliphate’, pp. 107‑17, and Andrzej Mikolajczyk, ‘Movements of Spanish Umayyad Dirhams from the Iberian Area to Central, Nordic, and Eastern Europe in the Early Middle Ages’, pp. 255‑68   

Miguel Barceló, ‘Why and How Did Andalusian Coins Travel to Europe during the Emirate and the Caliphate from 98/716-7 to 403/1012-3?’, Revue de l'Occident Musulmane et de la Méditerranée, 36 (1983), 5‑18

Top of page

Week 11. Peak and Collapse of al-Andalus

Required Readings

Primary Sources

AbÅ« al-Abbas Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Idhāri al-Marrākushi, Book of the Amazing Story of the History of the Kings of al-Andalus and Maghreb, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett, from ‘Córdoba de la primera a la segunda conquista de la ciudad por los berberiscos (Nov. 1009–May. 1013) según al-Bayān al-Mugrib de Ibn ‘IdārÄ«’, trans. by Giorgio Levi della Vida, ed. by Claudio Sánchez-Albornoz and trans. by Iñigo Arias, Cuadernos de Historia de España, 5 (1946), 148–69: translation on Minerva 

Ahmad ibn Muhammad al-MaqqarÄ«, The Breath of Perfume from the Branch of Green al-Andalus and Memorials of its Vizier Lisan al-DÄ«n ibn al-KhatÄ«b, trans. as The History of the Mohammedan Dynasties in Spain, Extracted from the Nafhu-t-tíb min ghosni-l-Andalusi-r-rattíb wa táríkh lisánu-d-dín Ibni-l-Khattíb, trans. by Pascual de Gayangos, 2 vols (London: W. H. Allen & Co., 1840), II <https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_Ie7TAAAAMAAJ> [last modified 10 December 2014 as of 23 July 2016], pp. 175–244: if necessary, skip pp. 199‒220, which are about intellectual life

Secondary Writing (in suggested order)

Simon Barton, ‘Spain in the Eleventh Century’, in The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume IV: c. 1024–1198, ed. by David Luscombe and Jonathan Riley-Smith, 2 vols (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), II, pp. 154–90 

Hugh Kennedy, Muslim Spain and Portugal: A Political History of al-Andalus (London: Longman, 1998), pp. 109–29

Questions to Think About

Between around 970 and 1000 al-Andalus was a power in the Iberian Peninsula like never before, with yearly raids on the Christian north that shook those kingdoms to their foundations. Yet by 1010 the armies of Castile and Barcelona were fighting in the suburbs of Córdoba itself. How had such strength so quickly become such weakness? What were the divisions and who exploited them?

Additional Reading

Primary Sources

Charter of the monastery of Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, 26 July 1012, unpublished translation by Jonathan Jarrett (on Minerva): up to the appearance of Hisnabert

Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources, ed. by Olivia Remie Constable, 2nd ed. (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011), pp. 252‒59 (no. 44)

Christians and Moors in Spain: vol. 3, Arabic sources (711‒1501), ed. by C. P. Melville and Ahmad ‘UbaydlÄ« (London: Aris & Phillips, 1992), pp. 56‒59 (no. 84)

Christians and Moors in Spain. Vol.1, 711-1150, ed. by Colin Smith (Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1988), pp. 76–9

Secondary Writing (in reverse chronological order)

Roger Collins, Caliphs and Kings: Spain, 796-1031 (Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2012), pp. 166–204

Peter C. Scales, The Fall of the Caliphate of Córdoba: Berbers and Andalusis in Conflict (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1994)

David Wasserstein, The Rise and Fall of the Party-Kings: Politics and Society in Islamic Spain 1002-1086 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985), pp. 55–82

Amirid al-Andalus

Francisco Franco, ‘The Andalusian Economy in the Times of Almanzor: Administrative Theory and Economic Reality through the Juridical and Geographic Sources’, Imago Temporis: Medium ævum, 2 (2008), 83–112 <http://www.raco.cat/index.php/ImagoTemporis/article/view/207048> [last modified 16 January 2012 as of 22 November 2016]

Mariam S. A. Rosser-Owen, ‘Poems in Stone: the Iconography of 'Amirid Poetry, and its 'Petrification' on 'Amirid Marbles’, in Revisiting al-Andalus: Perspectives on the Material Culture of Islamic Iberia and Beyond, ed. by Glaire D. Anderson (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2007), pp. 83–98

The Collapse

Hugh Kennedy, ‘Muslim Spain and Portugal: al-Andalus and its Neighbours’, in Luscombe and Riley-Smith, New Cambridge Medieval History 4, as above, I, pp. 599–622

Hugh Kennedy, ‘Sicily and al-Andalus under Muslim Rule’, in The New Cambridge Medieval History volume 3, c. 900–c. 1024, ed. by Timothy Reuter (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), pp. 646–69

Gabriel Martínez-Gros, ‘The Fall of the Umayyads of Cordova: The End of the Arab Caliphate’, Mediterranean Historical Review, 5 (1990), 117–49

George C. Miles, ‘The Year 400 A.H./1009-1010 A.D. at the Mint of Cordoba’, Nvmisma, 84–9 (1967), 9–25

Outside Interests

Janice Mann, ‘A New Architecture for a New Order: The Building Projects of Sancho el Mayor (1004–1035)’, in The White Mantle of Churches: Architecture, Liturgy, and Art around the Millennium, ed. by Nigel Hiscock (Turnhout: Brepols, 2003). pp. 233–48

Jaume Aurell, Authoring the Past: History, Autobiography, and Politics in Medieval Catalonia (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2002), pp. 21–38

Roger Collins, ‘The Spanish Kingdoms’, in Reuter, New Cambridge Medieval History 3, as above, pp. 670–91

Roger Collins, The Basques, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Blackwell, 1990), pp. 180–210

 

This list was last updated on 04/10/2019