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SLSP2730
Module Reading List

Central Problems in Sociology, 2019/20, Semester 1, 2
Ben Hirst
b.hirst@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Lecture Two (10th October)

Functionalism and Anomie: Durkheim and the Legacy of Durkheimian Sociology

Ben Hirst (b.hirst@leeds.ac.uk)

Lecture overview: This week we will introduce the functionalist tradition of sociology, most often associated with the names Emile Durkheim and Talcott Parsons. We consider their contribution to sociology, the critique of utilitarianism, individualism, rational economy theory and positivism, and cover central concepts such as ‘anomie’, ‘norms’, ‘values’ and ‘social facts’.

Workshop Readings (Content warning for discussions of suicide and torture)

Durkheim, Émile. 1970. Anomic Suicide. In Suicide: a study in sociology. London: Routledge. 241-276.

Mestrovic, S.G. and R. Lorenzo . 2008. ‘Durkheim's Concept of Anomie and the Abuse at Abu Ghraib’, Journal of Classical Sociology, 8 (2): 179-207.

Further readings

Aron, R. (1969) Main Currents in Sociological Thought 2, Harmondsworth: Penguin. Chapter on Durkheim.

Calhoun, C. et al (Eds) (2007) Classical Sociological Theory, 2nd Edition, Oxford: Blackwell. III parts C and D. (Durkheim readings) Important if answering essay on this topic.

Coser, L.A. (1971) Masters of Sociological Thought. Ideas in Historical and Social Context, New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Chapter 4 (on Durkheim).

Craib, I. (1997) Classical Social Theory, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 3, 7 and 11.

Durkheim, E. (1970) Suicide: a Study in Sociology, London: Routledge. And other editions.

Durkheim, E. (1997) The Division of Labour in Society, New York: The Free Press. And other editions.

Durkheim, E. (2001) The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life, Oxford: Oxford University Press. And other editions.

Giddens, A. (1971) Capitalism and Modern Social Theory: an Analysis of the Writings of Marx, Durkheim and Max Weber, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Part 2.

Habermas, J. (1981) ‘Talcott Parsons: Problems in Theory Construction’, Sociological Inquiry, 51: 173-96.

Halbwachs, Maurice. On Collective Memory

Hamilton, P. (1983) Talcott Parsons, London: Tavistock Publications.

Luhmann, N. (1993) Risk: A Sociological Theory, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.

Lukes, S. (1985) Emile Durkheim, His Life and Work: A Historical and Critical Study, Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Morrison, K. (1995 and later edition 2006) Marx, Durkheim, Weber: Formations of Modern Social Thought, London: Sage. Chapter 3.

Parsons, T. (1991) The Social System, London: Routledge. And other editions.

Parsons, T. (1971) The System of Modern Societies, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Parsons, T. and Shils, E. (Eds) (1951) Toward a General Theory of Action, Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Parsons, T. (1970) ‘On Building Social System Theory’, Daedalus, 826-81.

Parsons, T. (1966) Societies: Evolutionary and Comparative Perspectives, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: PrenticeHall. E-book: http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b2914003  

Rasch, W. (2001) Niklas Luhmann’s Modernity: the Paradoxes of Differentiation, Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Robertson, R. and B.S.Turner (Eds) (1991) Talcott Parsons: Theorist of Modernity, London: Sage.

Rocher, G. (1974) Talcott Parsons and American Sociology, London: Nelson.

Stones, R. (ed.) (2007) Key Sociological Thinkers, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Part 1 ‘Emile Durkheim’.

Swingewood, A. (2000) A Short History of Sociological Thought, 3rd Edition, Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. Chapters 4 and 8.

 

Lecture Three (17th October)

Max Weber: Interpretive Sociology

Ben Hirst (b.hirst@leeds.ac.uk)

Keywords: Verstehen, Rationalisation, Interpretivism, Cultural Sociology, Legitimation    

Workshop Readings

Holton, R. (2003) ‘Max Weber and the Interpretive Tradition’ in G. Delanty and E.F. Isin (Eds) Handbook of historical sociology, London: SAGE. E-Book: http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b3028120

Weber, Max. Economy and Society Vol 1: Introduction. (This is a long reading, but please aim to read the whole chapter. If you have difficulties reading the full chapter then then at least aim to read the sections ‘The Definition of Sociology and Social Action’, ‘Types of Social Action’ and ‘Legitimate Order’.  If you are having difficulties with this reading please see the module convenor/lecturer or workshop leader during their open door times, and make sure to raise your questions in Workshops)

Further Reading

Aron, R. (1969) Main Currents in Sociological Thought 2, Harmondsworth: Penguin. Chapter on Weber.

Ciaffa, J.A. (1998) Max Weber and the Problems of Value-free Social Science: a Critical Examination of the Werturteilsstreit, Lewisburg, NJ : Bucknell University Press.

Coser, L.A. (1971) Masters of Sociological Thought. Ideas in Historical and Social Context, New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Chapter 6 on Weber.

Craib, I. (1997) Classical Social Theory, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pages 17-18 and chapter 5.

Eisenstadt, S. N. & Schluchter, Wolfgang. 1998. Introduction: Paths to Early Modernities: A Comparative View. Daedalus, 127 (3), 1-18.

Giddens, A. (1971) Capitalism and Modern Social theory: an analysis of the writings of Marx, Durkheim and Max Weber, Cambridge University Press. Part 3.

Harrington, A. (ed.) (2005) Modern Social Theory: An Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press, chapter 3 on Weber and Simmel.

Holton, R. J. and Turner, B.S. (2010) Max Weber on economy and society, London: Routledge. E-Book.

Huff, T.E. (1984) Max Weber and the Methodology of the Social Sciences, London: Transaction Books.

Hughes, H. Stuart (1974) Consciousness and Society Chs. 2,3 and 6 (Very useful on the broader context of Weber and Simmel’s anti-positivism).

Lowith, K. (1982) Max Weber and Karl Marx, London: George Allen and Unwin.

Morrison, K. (1995 and 2006) Marx, Durkheim, Weber: Formations of Modern Social Thought, London: Sage. Chapter 4.

Parkin, F. (2002) Max Weber, London: Routledge.

Ritzer, G. and Goodman, D.J. (2004) Sociological Theory, 6th Edition, London: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 4.

Stones, R. (Ed.) (2007) Key Sociological Thinkers, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Part 1 ‘Max Weber’.

Susen, S. and Turner, B. S. 2011. Introduction to the Special Issue on Shmuel Noah Eisenstadt, 11 (3), 229-239.

Turner, B.S. (Ed.) (1999) Max Weber: Critical Responses, London: Routledge.

Weber, M. (1926) General Economic History, Glencoe, Ill.: The Free Press. And later editions

Weber, M. (1930) The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, London: Allen and Unwin. And later editions.

Weber, M. (1970) Max Weber: The Interpretation of Social Reality, London: Joseph.

See also the Cambridge Companion to Weber: http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b3276070 And http://www.sociosite.net/topics/weber.php

 

Lecture Four (24th October)

Ideology: Marx, Gramsci and Althusser

Tom Campbell (t.w.campbell@leeds.ac.uk)

Lecture overview: This lecture covers the Marxist theory of ideology, focusing particular attention on social theorists Antonio Gramsci and Louis Althusser.  In doing so, we will show you how concepts develop in response to changing social and historical conditions. 

Workshop reading

Althusser, Louis. 1970. Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses (Notes towards an Investigation) Available at: https://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/althusser/1970/ideology.htm

Further reading

Anderson, P. (1976) Considerations on Western Marxism, London: New Left Books.

Aron, R. (1967) Main Currents in Sociological Thought 1, Harmondsworth: Penguin. And later editions of this text.

Aron, R., Frolund, J. P. and Andersen, H. (2000) ‘Neo-Marxist Theories’, in H. Andersen and L. B. Kaspersen (eds.) Classical and Modern Social Theory, Oxford: Blackwell.

Boggs, C. (1976) Gramsci’s Marxism, London: Pluto Press.

Boggs, C. (1979) ‘Marxism and the Role of Intellectuals’, New Political Science, 1 (2/3): 7-23.

Callincos, A. (1976) Althusser’s Marxism, London: Pluto Press. Callinicos, A. (2007) Social Theory: A Historical Introduction, Cambridge: Polity Press. Chs 4, 9.1, 11.2.

Coser, L.A. (1971) Masters of Sociological Thought. Ideas in Historical and Social Context, New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Chapter 2 on Marx.

Craib, I. (1997) Classical Social Theory, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chs 4, 8 and 12.

Elliot, Gregory, (1987) Althusser: the detour of theory. London: verso.

Giddens, A. (1971) Capitalism and Modern Social Theory: an Analysis of the Writings of Marx, Durkheim and Max Weber, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Part 1.

Held, D. (1980) Introduction to Critical Theory, Cambridge: Polity Press. Introduction, pp 13-29.

Joseph, J. (2006) Marxism and Social Theory, Basingstoke: Palgrave. Chs 1, 2, 3, 4, 7

Gramsci, A. (1992) Prison notebooks, New York: Columbia University Press.

Kiliminster, R (1998). The Sociological Revolution from Enlightenment to the Global Age, London: Routledge. Chapter 3 on Marx’s Theory of Knowledge.

MacLelland, D. (2007) Marxism After Marx, Basingstoke: Palgrave. Introduction, Chapters on The Revisionist Controversy, Lukacs, Gramsci, Structuralist Marxism, Marxism and Postmodernism.

Manson, P. (2000a) ‘Karl Marx’, in H. Andersen and L. B. Kaspersen (eds.), Classical and Modern Social Theory, Oxford: Blackwell.

Manson, P. (2000b) ‘Marxism’, in H. Andersen and L. B. Kaspersen (eds.), Classical and Modern Social Theory, Oxford: Blackwell.

Sassoon, A. (1980) Gramsci’s Politics, London: Croom Helm. Part 3: 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 12, 15.

Stones, R. (ed.) (2007) Key Sociological Thinkers, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Part 1 ‘Karl Marx’.

 

Lecture Five (31st October)

Critical Theory: Adorno, Horkheimer, Marcuse

Tom Campbell (t.w.campbell@leeds.ac.uk)

Lecture overview: The lecture introduces you to the trenchant critique of the emerging American consumer society in the middle of the twentieth century, and particularly its consequence for how we think about social action, individuality and the possibility of social transformation. 

 

Workshop reading

Adorno, T.W. and Horkheimer, M. (1999) Dialectic of Enlightenment. London: Verso Classics [First published 1947], especially ‘The Culture Industry – Enlightenment as Mass Deception’

http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/adorno/1944/culture-industry.htm

 

Marcuse, H. (2002) One-Dimensional Man. London: Routledge Classics [First published 1964], especially Part I ‘One-Dimensional Society’.

https://www.marxists.org/ebooks/marcuse/one-dimensional-man.htm

 

Further Reading:

For an excellent archive of material on Critical Theory, including the Frankfurt School and its key figures, see: http://www.marxists.org/subject/frankfurt-school/index.htm

Adorno, T.W. (2001) The Culture Industry: selected essays on mass culture. London: Routledge.

Adorno, T.W. (2000) The Adorno Reader, edited by B. O'Connor, Blackwell.

Adorno, T.W. and Horkheimer, M. (1999) Dialectic of Enlightenment. London: Verso Classics.

Arato, A. and Gebhardt, E. (eds) (1982) Essential Frankfurt School Reader. London: Continuum.

Bronner, S. and Kellner, D. (eds) (1989) Critical Theory and Society: A Reader. London: Routledge. Ch. 9.

Brunkhorst, H. (1999) Adorno and Critical Theory. Cardiff: University of Wales Press.

Claussen, D. (2008) Theodor W. Adorno: One Last Genius. Belknap Press.

Delanty, G. (ed.) (2004) Theodor W. Adorno. London: Sage.

Elliott, A. (2003) Critical Visions: New Directions in Social Theory. Rowman and Littlefield.

Fromm, E. (2001) Fear of Freedom. London: Routledge Classics [First published 1941], especially Chs. 2 and 7.

Funk, R., Portman, I. and Kunel, M. (2000) Erich Fromm: His Life and Ideas. London: Continuum.

Held, D. (1980) Introduction to Critical Theory: Horkheimer to Habermas. London: Hutchinson.

Honneth, A. (2007) Disrespect: The Normative Foundations of Critical Theory. Polity Press.

How, A. (2003) Critical Theory. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Jarvis, S. (1998) Adorno: a critical introduction. Oxford: Polity.

Jarvis. S. (ed.) (2004) Theodor W. Adorno: critical evaluations in cultural theory. London: Routledge.

Jay, M. (1996) The Dialectical Imagination: A History of the Frankfurt School, 1923-1950. University of California Press.

Kellner, D. (1989) Critical Theory, Marxism and Modernity. Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press, Ch.5.

Kellner, D. (1984) Herbert Marcuse and the Crisis of Marxism. London: Macmillan.

Knapp, G. (1989) The Art of Living: Erich Fromm’s Life and Works. P. Lang.

Lash, S. and Lury, C. (2007) Global Culture Industry: The Mediation of Things. Cambridge: Polity, Introduction.

Lodziak, C. (1995) Manipulating Needs: Capitalism and Culture. London: Pluto Press.

Lodziak, C. (2002) The Myth of Consumerism. London: Pluto Press.

Miller, D. (1987) Material Culture and Mass Consumption. Oxford: Blackwell.

Paddison, M. (1996) Adorno, Modernism and Mass culture: essays on critical theory and music. London: Kahn & Averill.

Rush, F. (2004) The Cambridge Companion to Critical Theory. Cambridge: University Press. [also available at: http://0cco.cambridge.org.wam.leeds.ac.uk/uid=630/private_home

Thomson, A. (2009) Erich Fromm: explorer of the human condition. Basignstoke: Palgrave.

Thomson, A. (2006) Adorno: a guide for the perplexed. London: Continuum.

Wiggerhaus, R. (1994) The Frankfurt School: Its Histories, Theories and Political Significance. MIT Press.

Witkin, R.W. (2003) Adorno on Popular Culture. London: Routledge.

 

 

Lecture Six (7th November)

Hannah Arendt: Power, Violence and Politics

Jack Palmer (j.palmer@leeds.ac.uk)

Lecture overview: Hannah Arendt was one of the most influential thinkers of the twentieth century. Although Arendt thought of herself principally as a political philosopher, her thought has much to offer sociological theory. This lecture will introduce her novel contributions to the understanding of power, violence and politics. Situating her thought in relation to her biography, it will also consider her renowned work on totalitarianism and will consider why her famous book The Origins of Totalitarianism has received an upsurge in attention in recent years. We will also explore Arendt's excoriating critique of the social sciences - she argued that the social sciences of her time were unable to anticipate the emergence of Nazi and Stalinist totalitarianism because of its deficient historical character

Workshop readings

Arendt, Hannah. 1994 [1950]. Social Science Techniques and the Study of Concentration Camps. In Essays in Understanding, 1930-1954: Formation, Exile, and Totalitarianism. New York, NY: Schocken Books, 232-246. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

AND

Benhabib, Seyla. Chapter Three: The Destruction of the Public Sphere and the Emergence of Totalitarianism. The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt. New York, Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Inc. 62-101. 

OR

Bernstein, Richard. 2011. Hannah Arendt’s Reflections on Violence and Power. IRIS: European Journal of Philosophy and Public Debate. November 2011: 3-30. Available online.

 

Further reading

Arendt, Hannah. 1943. We refugees. Reprinted in Robinson (ed.) Altogether Elsewhere: Writers on Exile. London: Faber and Faber. Available online at: https://www-leland.stanford.edu/dept/DLCL/files/pdf/hannah_arendt_we_refugees.pdf

Arendt, Hannah. 1970. On Violence. London: Harvest.

Arendt, Hannah. 1973. Crises of the republic. Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin.

Arendt, Hannah. 1994. Essays in Understanding, 1930-1954: Formation, Exile, Totalitarianism. New York: Schocken Books (not available in the library but accessible here: https://archive.org/stream/HannahArendtEssaysInUnderstanding19301954/%5BHannah_Arendt%5D_Essays_in_Understanding,_1930-1954_djvu.txt)

Arendt, Hannah. 1998 [1958]. The Human Condition (2nd ed.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Arendt, Hannah. 2004 [1951]. The Origins of Totalitarianism (1st ed.). New York: Schocken Books. (other editions available in the library).

Arendt, Hannah. 2006 [1963]. On revolution. New York: Penguin Books. (other editions available in the library

Baehr, Peter. 2007. The ‘Masses’ in Hannah Arendt’s Theory of Totalitarianism. The Good Society, 16 (2), 12-18.

Baehr, Peter. 2010. Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism and the Social Sciences. Stanford, CA: University of Stanford Press, chapter 1.

Benhabib, Seyla. 1993. Feminist Theory and Hannah Arendt’s Concept of Public Space. History of the Human Sciences, 6 (2), 97-114.

Benhabib, Seyla. 2000. The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, especially chapter 3.

Bernstein, Richard. 2002. Radical Evil: A Philosophical Investigation. Cambridge: Polity, chapter 8.

Bernstein, Richard. 2005. Hannah Arendt on the stateless. Parallax, 11 (1), 46-60

Bowring, Finn. 2011. Hannah Arendt: A Critical Introduction. London: Pluto Press.

Kristeva, Julia. 2001. Hannah Arendt. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. 

Pitkin, Hanna Fenichel. 1998. The Attack of the Blob: Hannah Arendt’s Concept of the Social. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Stone, Dan. 2011. Defending the Plural: Hannah Arendt and Genocide Studies. New Formations, 71, 46-57. 

Swift, Simon. 2009. Hannah Arendt. London: Routledge.

Walsh, Phillip. 2008. Hannah Arendt, Sociology and Political Modernity. Journal of Classical Sociology, 8 (3), 344-366.

Walsh, Phillip. 2011. The Human Condition as Social Ontology: Hannah Arendt on Society, Action and Knowledge. History of the Human Sciences, 24 (2), 120-137.

Walsh, Phillip. 2015. Arendt Contra Sociology: Theory, Society and its Science. London: Routledge.

Young-Bruehl, Elisabeth. 1982. Hannah Arendt: For the Love of the World. Yale, CT: Yale University Press.

 

Lecture Seven (14th November)

Power and Governmentality: Foucault and the Foucauldian Tradition

Tom Campbell (t.w.campbell@leeds.ac.uk)

Keywords: Power, governmentality, bio-politics, Panopticon,

Workshop reading

Foucault, Michel. Panopticism (extract). Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Available at: https://selforganizedseminar.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/foucault-panopticism.pdf

Further reading

Bristow, Joseph (1997) ‘'Discursive Desires' in Sexuality, London: Routledge.

Danaher, Geoff ,Tony Schirato & Jenn Webb (2000) Understanding Foucault, London: Sage.

Diamond, Irene and Lee Quinby (1988) Feminism and Foucault, Northeastern University Press.

Foucault, Michel (1974) Discipline and Punish, New York: Random House.

Foucault, Michel (1979) The History of Sexuality: Volume 1, Harmonsdworth: Penguin

Foucault, Michel (1982) The Subject and Power Critical Inquiry, 8 (4) 777-795.

Foucault, Michel (2000) Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth: Essential Works of Michel Foucault 1954-1984 (Essential Works of Michel Foucault 1954-1984 volume 1)

Gutting, Gary (2005) Foucault: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hoy, David (ed) 1986 Foucault: A Critical Reader, Oxford: Blackwell

Lotringer, Sylvere (1996) Foucault Live: Collected Interviews, 1961-1984, New York: Semiotext[e].

McNay, Lois (1994) Foucault: A Critical Introduction, London: Continuum.

Mills, Sara (2003) Foucault, London: Routledge

Rabinow, Paul (ed) (1991) The Foucault Reader, Harmonsworth: Penguin

Rose, N., & Miller, P. (1992). Political power beyond the state: Problematics of government. British journal of sociology, 173-205.

Stones, R. (Ed) (2008) Key Sociological Thinkers, 2nd Edition, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Relevant section/s.

 

Lecture Eight (21st November)

Power, Rhetoric and Eurocentrism: Postcolonial Theor

Sayyid (S.Sayyid@leeds.ac.uk)

 

Workshop reading

Hall, S. (1992) “The West and the Rest: Discourse and Power” in S. Hall & B. Gieben (Eds). Formations of modernity Cambridge: Polity Press.

AND

Fanon, F, (2005) The Wretched of the Earth, New York: Grove Press, chapter 1.

OR EITHER OF THE FOLLOWING

Loomba, A. Colonialism/Postcolonialism, London: Routledge, pp. 7-22.

McClintock, A. (1995) Imperial Leather, London: Routledge, Ch. 5

Venn, C., (2005), The postcolonial challenge : towards alternative worlds London: Sage. chapter 1.

Further Reading

Bayly, C.A (2004) The birth of the modern world, 1780-1914: global connections and comparisons, Oxford: Blackwell.

Bhambra, Gurminder. 2007. Rethinking Modernity: Postcolonialism and the Sociological Imagination. Basingstoke: Palgrave. 

Dussel, Enrique. 1993. Eurocentrism and Modernity. Boundary 2, 20 (3), 65-76.

Furedi, F. (1999) The silent war: imperialism and the changing perception of race, London: Pluto Press.

Hall, S. (1996) ‘When was “the Post-Colonial”? Thinking at the limit’ in I. Chambers and L. Curti (Eds) The post-colonial question: common skies, divided horizons, London: Routledge.

Hesse, B. (2007) ‘Racialized modernity: An analytics of white mythologies,’ Ethnic and Racial Studies, Volume 30, Issue 4,

Huggian, G. (ed) (2013) The Oxford Handbook of Postcolonial Studies, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Mignolo, W. (2009) ‘Epistemic Epistemic Disobedience, Independent Thought and Decolonial Freedom’, Theory, Culture & Society, Vol. 26 no. 7-8, pp. 159-181.

Mouffe, C. (2005) On the Political, London: Routledge.

Shaw, M. (2000) Theory of the global state : globality as unfinished revolution, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Slatter, D. (2004) Geopolitics and the post-colonial: rethinking North-South relations, Oxford: Blackwell.

Venn, C. (2005) The postcolonial challenge: towards alternative worlds, London: Sage.

Wolf, E.R. (1982) Europe and the people without history, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Sayyid, S. (2003) A Fundamental Fear, London: Zed Press. Chapter 5

Seth, S. 2016. Is Thinking with ‘Modernity’ Eurocentric? Cultural Sociology, 10 (3), 385-398.

Weber, M. (2004) ‘Politics as Vocation’ in The vocation lectures : "Science as a vocation", "Politics as a vocation", edited and with an introduction by David S. Owen and Tracy B. Strong, Indianapolis: Hackett Pub.

Young, R. (2001) Postcolonialism: An Historical Introduction, Oxford: Blackwell.

 

Lecture Nine (28th November)

Identity, Performativity and Gender: Judith Butler

Ruth Holliday (r.holliday@leeds.ac.uk)

Keywords:

Butler, J. (1988) 'Performative Acts and Gender Constitution: An Essay in Phenomenology and Feminist Theory', Theatre Journal, Vol. 40, No. 4, pp. 519 - 531. Available online at:

http://people.su.se/~snce/texter/butlerPerformance.pdf

AND

Butler, Judith (1994) ‘Gender as Performance’ Radical Philosophy 67 (reprinted in Peter Osborne (1996) A Critical Sense, London: Routledge). Ideally, read full version available in the library or, at a  push, see a shortened version available at: http://www.theory.org.uk/but-int1.htm

Essential Reading

Butler, J. (1988) 'Performative Acts and Gender Constitution: An Essay in Phenomenology and Feminist Theory', Theatre Journal, Vol. 40, No. 4, pp. 519 - 531. Available online at:

http://people.su.se/~snce/texter/butlerPerformance.pdf

Butler, Judith (1994) ‘Gender as Performance’ Radical Philosophy 67 (reprinted in Peter Osborne(1996) A Critical Sense, London: Routledge). Ideally, read full version available in the library or, at a  push, see a shortened version available at: http://www.theory.org.uk/but-int1.htm

Stein, A. & Plummer, K. 1994. ‘I can’t even think straight’: ‘Queer’ Theory and the Missing Sexual Revolution in Sociology. Sociological Theory, 12 (2), 178-187.

Further Reading

Beauvoir, Simone de (1949) The Second Sex, Harmondsworth: Penguin. In library and online at: http://www.marxists.org/reference/subject/ethics/de-beauvoir/2nd-sex/index.htm

Butler, Judith (1990) Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity, New York: Routledge. In library and E-book. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b2359139

Butler, Judith (1991) "Imitation and Gender Insubordination" in D. Fuss (ed) Inside/Out: Lesbian Theories, Gay Theories, New York: Routledge. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b1298752

Butler, Judith (1993) Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of "Sex”, New York: Routledge. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b1369034

Butler, Judith (1997) The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection, Stanford University Press. In library and available online at: http://website.education.wisc.edu/halverson/wpcontent/uploads/2012/12/Judith-Butler-The-Psychic-Life-of-Power-copy.pdf  (see chapter 3 in particular).

Butler, Judith (1997) Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative, New York: Routledge. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b1810172

Butler, Judith (2004) Undoing Gender, New York: Routledge. In library and E-book: http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b2435444

Butler, Judith (2005) Giving An Account of Oneself, Fordham University Press. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b2681455

Epstein, Julia and Straub, Kristina (eds.) (1991) Body Guards: The Cultural Politics of Gender Ambiguity, London: Routledge. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b1310823

Fausto- Sterling, Anne (1992) Myths of Gender: Biological Theories about Men and Women, New York: Basic Books. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b2411281

Jaggar, Gill (2008) Judith Butler: Sexual Politics, Social Change and the Power of the Performative, London: Routledge. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b2253665

Kessler, Suzanne (1994) ‘The Medical Construction of Gender: Case Management of Intersexed Infants’ in Anne Herrmann and Abigail Stewart (eds.) Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Boulder: Westview. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b2076873

Laqueur, Thomas (1990) Making Sex: Body and gender from the Greeks to Freud, Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b1364741

Richardson, Diane (2000) Rethinking Sexuality, London: Sage. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b2031632

Rubin, Gayle (1993) ‘Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality’, in Henry Abelove, Michèle Aina Barale and David M. Halperin The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader, London: Routledge. http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b1405438

Salih, Sarah (2002) Judith Butler (Routledge Critical Thinkers) London: Routledge. In library and E-book: http://lib.leeds.ac.uk/record=b2840469

 

Lecture Ten (5th December)

Top of page

Identity, Race and Nation: Paul Gilroy

Jack Palmer (j.palmer@leeds.ac.uk)

Keywords: colonialism, slavery, fascism, nationalism, racism, race-thinking, the black Atlantic, double consciousness, vernacular culture, ethnic absolutism, postcolonial melancholia, conviviality, multiculturalism, methodological nationalism

 

Essential Reading

Gilroy, Paul. (1993). The Black Atlantic as a Counter Culture of Modernity. In The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness. London: Verso.

Gilroy, Paul. (2004). ‘Has it Come to This?’. In After Empire: Melancholia or Convivial Culture. London: Routledge.

Dworkin, Dennis. (2009). Paul Gilroy and the Cultural Politics of Decline. Rethinking History, 13 (4), 521-539.  

Supplementary material

Who are the Slaves Now? Podcast interview with Russel Brand. Available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66vnrErdrJs&t=2423s

Tanner Lectures on Human Values, delivered at Yale University in 2014. Available here: http://tannerlectures.utah.edu/Gilroy%20manuscript%20PDF.pdf

BBC Radio programme on Paul Gilroy’s landmark book There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack. Available here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08chbpf

Further Reading

Back, L., & Solomos, J. (Eds.). (2000). Theories of race and racism: A reader. Psychology Press.

Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies. University of Birmingham. (1982). The empire strikes back: Race and racism in 70s Britain. London: Hutchinson in association with the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, University of Birmingham.

Evans, L. (2009). The black Atlantic: Exploring Gilroy's legacy. Atlantic Studies, 6(2), 255-268. 

Ferrari, G. D. (2012). The ship, the plantation, and the polis : Reading gilroy and glissant as moral philosophy. Comparative Literature Studies, 49(2), 186-209.

Gilroy, P. (2005). Postcolonial melancholia. New York: Columbia University Press.

Gilroy, P. (2010). Darker than blue: On the moral economies of black atlantic culture. Cambridge;Cambridge, Mass;: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

Cohen, J., & Lindgaard, J. (2016). interview with paul gilroy: From black atlantic to postcolonial melancolia. Revista Iberoamericana, 82(255-256), 301-312.

Gilroy, P. (2002). There ain't no black in the union jack: The cultural politics of race and nation. London: Routledge.

Gilroy, P. (2004). Between camps: Nations, cultures and the allure of race (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.

Gilroy, P. (2004). After empire: Melancholia or convivial culture?. Abingdon: Routledge.

Gilroy, P. (1993). The black atlantic: Modernity and double consciousness. London: Verso.

Gilroy, P. (1993). Small acts: Thoughts on the politics of black cultures. London: Serpent's Tail.

Gilroy, P. (2000). Against race: Imagining political culture beyond the color line. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

Gilroy, P. (2006). Multiculture in times of war: An inaugural lecture given at the london school of economics. Critical Quarterly, 48(4), 27-45

Gilroy, P. (2005). Multiculture, double consciousness and the 'war on terror'.  Patterns of Prejudice, 39(4), 431-443.

Gilroy, P. (1990). The end of anti‐racism∗. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 17(1), 71-83.

Gilroy, Paul. 2006. "British cultural studies and the pitfalls of identity." In Durham and Kellner (eds.) Media and Cultural Studies (2006): 381.

Gilroy, P. (2005). Multiculture, double consciousness and the ‘war on terror’. Patterns of Prejudice, 39(4), 431-443.

Shelby, T. (2008). Cosmopolitanism, blackness, and Utopia: A conversation with Paul Gilroy. Transition, 98(1), 116-135.

Smith, M. (1999). On the state of cultural studies: An interview with paul gilroy. Third Text, 13(49), 15-26.

Valluvan, S. (2016). Conviviality and multiculture: A post-integration sociology of multi-ethnic interaction. Young, 24(3), 204-221

Williams, P. 2013. Paul Gilroy. London: Routledge. Available online via the library website.

 

Lecture Eleven (12th December)

Semester One Summary and Essay Q&A

Ben Hirst (b.hirst@leeds.ac.uk)

Lecture overview: This final lecture will be focused almost entirely on addressing frequently asked questions regarding assignments. In order for me to address these in the best way possible, if you could please send your essay questions to me (b.hirst@leeds.ac.uk) with the subject line ‘Essay Q&A’ any time prior to the lecture, I will aim to respond to as many of them as I can. Don’t worry though – if you think of something on the day there will be a time for a Q&A session!

This list was last updated on 04/11/2019