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LUBS5320M
Module Reading List

Training and Development, 2021/22, Semester 2
Prof. Irena Grugulis
I.Grugulis@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Key texts:

Grugulis, I. (2007) Skills, training and human resource development : a critical text, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.  Core 

Noon, M. and Blyton, P. and Morrell, K. (2013) The realities of work 4th edition, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Wilkinson, A., Redman, T. and Dundon, T. (2017) Contemporary Human Resource Management, 5th edition, London, Prentice Hall, Chapter 5.

Warhurst, C., Mayhew, K., Finegold, D. and Buchanan, J. eds. The Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training Oxford University Press 2017 ISBN 978-0-19-965536-6

Warhurst, C., Keep, E. and Grugulis, I. (2004) The skills that matter, Basingstoke : Palgrave

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Other texts:

Bach, S. and Edwards, M. (eds) (2013) Managing Human resources 5 th edn. Oxford: Blackwell.

Rainbird, H., Fuller, A. and A. Munro, A. ( 2004) (eds) Workplace learning in context. London: Routledge

Thelen, K. (2004) How institutions evolve : the political economy of skills in Germany, Britain, the United States, and Japan. New York: Cambridge University Press

van Wanrooy et al (2013) Employment relations in the shadow of recession : findings from the 2011 Workplace Employment Relations Study Basingstoke:Palgrave

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Internet sites

Students are encouraged to make good use of the Internet for additional material. However, exercise judgement. Typing the essay question into Google is NOT a valid research method. Ask yourself: i s this website a credible source of academic-quality material (e.g. university research bodies, research councils, employers’ associations and trade union sites, the better news and analysis publications)? It is better NOT to include internet-sourced material than to include rubbish from sub-standard sources. You lose marks for using poor material . Also, when using Internet-sourced material, be very careful indeed about plagiarism. (Read the MA Handbook on plagiarism.) Do not cut-and-paste, because we check everyone.

You should also be wary about conducting random internet searches using key words.  There are many, many management journals.  Some are outstanding.  Many are not.  Remember that the reading list is there to help you and that you can find guidance on extending your reading below.  If you choose to ignore the reading list entirely and if your essay draws on a random list of references you are very likely to fail.  In order to make sure you get good marks start your reading with the reading list and the sources we recommend.  If you then wish to go beyond them that is fine but again, start by following the guidance we provide.

While every effort has been made to ensure that all the links below are valid and up-to-date, the web is always developing, and some changes may have occurred. If you have a problem accessing any of these sites, please let the module leader know. Additionally, if you do come across any particularly useful sites please forward the details on to the module leader.

The best site that I am aware of, and of immediate relevance to this course, is that for SKOPE (Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance). SKOPE is an ESRC-funded research centre and wider network of academics based at the University of Oxford. Through it you can download skills surveys, short briefings and lengthy reports completely free of charge:

In the US, the EPRN (Employment Policy Research Network) focuses research from the USA, Canada and the UK on employment, skills and technology for a public and policy audience:

Back in the UK, the Advanced Institute of Management Research (AIM) has valuable links to research on management across the board including research papers and practitioner/policy publications which are freely downloadable from the site:

  • http://www.webarchive.org.uk/ukwa/target/15237162/source/subject    

The research Centre for Learning and Life Chances in Knowledge Economies and Society (LLAKES) has more excellent and freely downloadable papers at:

Policy work for the UK together with papers on key issues can be accessed via the UK Commission for Employment and Skills website at:

o http://www.cipd.co.uk/ The website for the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (the UK's professional body for HR/Personnel professionals). See too the web version of its practitioner-oriented magazine (this may require membership to access some sections): http://www.peoplemanagement.co.uk/index.html

o http://www.personneltoday.net/ Links for the HR magazine Personnel today.

  • General research sites:

https://web.archive.org/web/20050319085502/http://www.eiro.eurofound.ie/ An EU-funded industrial relations ‘observatory’ with extensive material on different countries’ approaches to different ER issues. Very useful for short, accurate summaries of key ER elements.

o http://www.employment-studies.co.uk/ Provides extensive on-line summaries of the Institute for Employment Studies reports (though the full versions do cost).

UK Government site: http://www.bis.gov.uk/ and http://www.dfes.gov.uk/index.htm

Trade union sites (helpful for counter-management/ pro-union reports and analysis):

o http://www.tuc.org.uk/ for the TUC, organised around a 'virtual building'.

o http://www.ilo.org/ The International Labour Organisation, a workers’ organisation.

See also:

OECD: http://www.oecd.org/home/    

ETUI: http://www.etuc.org/etui/    

UNICE: http://www.unice.org/Content/Default.asp    

CBI: http://www.cbi.org.uk/home.html

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Journals

The following journals all contain articles relevant to the module. If you want to research a topic more broadly, or if you are conducting a literature review for your dissertation this is a good place to start and you are more likely to find good articles by turning to these journals first than by typing general search terms into Google or Google Scholar.

Administrative Science Quarterly.

Academy of Management Journal.

The Academy of Management Review.

British Journal of Industrial Relations.

European Journal of Industrial Relations.

Human Relations

Human Resource Management Journal.

Industrial and Labor Relations Review

International Journal of Human Resource Management.

International Journal of Training and Development.

Journal of Education and Work.

Industrial Relations Journal.

Journal of Vocational Education & Training.

Organization Science

Organization Studies

Work, Employment and Society.

Work and Occupations.

 

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  1. The Nature of Skill

How is skill to be conceptualised and understood? What are the implications of this for studying work? Is training and development always a ‘good’ thing? Who benefits from training? Who should pay for training?

Core Readings:

Grugulis, I. (2007) Skills, training and human resource development : a critical text, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Chapter 2. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva.

Noon, M. and Blyton, P. and Morrell, K. (2013) The Realities of Work, 4th edition, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.  Chapter 5

Stuart, M. (2018) ‘Training and Development, whose interests do they serve?’ in Gall, G. (ed.) Handbook on the Politics of Labour, Work and Employment Edward Elgar OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (IK 10/02/2021) 

Wilkinson, A., Redman, T. and Dundon, T. (2017) Contemporary Human Resource Management, 5th edition, London, Prentice Hall, Chapter 5.

Additional Readings:

Bryson, J. (2017) ‘Disciplinary perspectives on skill’ in Warhurst, C., Mayhew, K., Finegold, D. and Buchanan, J. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training Oxford University Press: Oxford

Cappelli, P. (2015) ‘Skill gaps, skill shortages and skill mismatches: evidence and arguments from the United States’ Industrial and labor relations review. 68 (2) pp. 251 - 290

Cockburn, C. (1983) Brothers: male dominance and technological change Pluto Press: London.

Gambin, L. and Hogarth, T. (2017) ‘Who pays for skills? Differing perspectives on Who should pay and Why’ in Warhurst, C., Mayhew, K., Finegold, D. and Buchanan, J. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training Oxford University Press: Oxford

Green, F. (2013) Skills and skilled work : an economic and social analysis Oxford: Oxford University Press

Green, F. (2006) Demanding work : the paradox of job quality in the affluent economy Princeton and Oxford

Grugulis, I. (2003) ‘Putting skills to work: learning and employment at the start of the century’ Human Resource Management Journal. 13 (2) pp. 3 – 12.

James, S. et al. (2013) ‘What we know and what we need to know about graduate skills’ Work, Employment and Society. 27 (6) pp. 952 - 963

Keep, E. (2005) ‘Skills, training and the quest for the Holy Grail of influence and status’ in Bach, S. (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition 4 th edition Oxford:Blackwell.

Keep, E. and Mayhew, K. (1999) 'The assessment: knowledge, skills and competitiveness' Oxford Review of Economic Policy. Spring 15 (1) pp. 1 – 16.

Keep, E. and Mayhew, K. (2010) ‘Moving beyond skills as a social and economic panacea’ Work, Employment and Society. 24(4) 565-577.

Lloyd, C., Warhurst, C. and Dutton, E. (2013) ‘The weakest link? Product market strategies, skill and pay in the hotel industry’ Work, Employment and Society. 27 (2) pp. 252 - 271

Stuart, M. (2018) ‘Training and development – whose interests does it serve?’ in Gall, G. (ed.) Handbook on the Politics of Labour, Work and Employment Edward Elgar   

 Stuart, M. and Cooney, R. (2008) ‘Training and the limits of supply-side skill developments’, Industrial Relations Journal. 39(5): 346-353.

Thompson, P. and McHugh, D. (2009) Work Organisations: a critical introduction Fourth edition Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, Chapter 3. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva.

Vallas, S. P. (1990) ‘The Concept of Skill: A Critical Review’, Work and Occupations., 17(4): 379-3.98.

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  1. Comparative Frameworks and National Systems

This session will look at the key determinants of skill formation regimes. Why are some economies seemingly stuck in a ‘low skill equilibrium’, whilst others are not? What are the institutional conditions of high skill economies? The lecture and the workshop will investigate these questions with specific reference to international variation and different national systems.

Core readings:

Bosch, G. (2017) ‘Different national skill systems’ in Warhurst, C., Mayhew, K., Finegold, D. and Buchanan, J. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training Oxford University Press: Oxford

 Bosch, G. and Charest, J. (2008) ‘Vocational training and the labour market in liberal and coordinated economies’, Industrial relations journal. 39(5): 428-447 Core 

Finegold, D and Soskice, D. (1988) The Failure of Training in Britain: Analysis and Prescription, Oxford review of economic policy., 3(4): 21-53

Grugulis, I. (2007 ) Skills, training and human resource development : a critical text. Palgrave MacMillan. Chapter 3 Core 

Marchington, M., Wilkinson, A., Donnelly, R. and Knighou, A. (2016) Human Resource Management at Work, 6th Edition, London: CIPD. Chapter 9 available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva.

Additional readings:

Ashton, D. and Green, F. (1996). Education, training, and the global economy. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Ashton, D., Sung, J. and Turbin, J. (2000) ‘Towards a framework for the comparative analysis of national systems of skill formation’, International journal of training and development., 4 (1): 8-25

Busemeyer, M. R. and Trampusch, C. (2012) The political economy of collective skill formation Oxford University Press Chapter One

Coates, D. (2000) Models of capitalism : growth and stagnation in the modern era. Cambridge: Polity

Crouch, C., Finegold, D. and Sako, M. (2001) Are skills the answer? : the political economy of skill creation in advanced industrial countries, Oxford: OUP.

Dieckhoff, M. (2008) ‘Skills and occupational attainment: a comparative study of Germany, Denmark and the UK’ Work, employment and society. 22 (1) pp. 89 - 108

Lloyd, C. (1999) ‘Regulating employment: Implications for skill development in the aerospace industry’, European journal of industrial relations. 5 (2): 163-185.

Lloyd, C. and Payne, J. (2004) ‘The political economy of skill: a theoretical approach to developing a high skills strategy in the UK’, in C. Warhurst., I Grugulis. And E. Keep (eds) The skills that matter Palgrave-MacMillan. 207-224.

Miguel Martínez Lucio, Sveinung Skule, Wilfried Kruse, and Vera Trappmann (2007) ‘ Regulating Skill Formation in Europe: German, Norwegian and Spanish Policies on Transferable Skills European journal of industrial relations. 13: 323-340.

Ramirez, P. and Rainbird, H. (2010) ‘Making the connections: bringing skill formation back into global value chain analysis’ Work, employment and society. 24 (4) pp. 699 – 710

Rubery, J. and Grimshaw, D. (2002) The organization of employment : an international perspective Palgrave Macmillan

Thelen, K. (2004) How institutions evolve : the political economy of skills in Germany, Britain, the United States, and Japan. CUP. Chapters 1 and 6.

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  1. The Changing Nature of Skill

The idea of skills has changed dramatically over the last 30 years and is now primarily used to mean ‘soft’ or ‘social’ skills such as problem solving, communication or teamworking. This session explores that shift and considers its implications.

Core readings

Grugulis, I. (2007) Skills, training and human resource development : a critical text Houndsmills: Palgrave Chapter 5. Core 

Brown, P. (1995) ‘Cultural capital and social exclusion: some observations on recent trends in education, employment and the labour market’ Work, employment and society. 9(1): 21–51.

Callaghan, G.and P. Thompson. (2002). “We recruit attitude: the selection and shaping of routine call centre labour.” Journal of management studies. 39(2):233-254.

Grugulis, I. (2017) A very short, fairly interesting and reasonably cheap book about human resource management Sage Chapter 7 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva   

Payne, J. (2017) ‘The changing meaning of skill: still contested, still important’ in Warhurst, C., Mayhew, K., Finegold, D. and Buchanan, J. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training Oxford University Press: Oxford

Warhurst, C., Tilly, C. and Gatta, M. (2017) ‘A New Social Construction of Skill’ in Buchanan, J., Finegold, D., Mayhew, K. and Warhurst, C. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training Oxford: Oxford University Press

Additional Readings

Brown, P.and A. Hesketh. (2004). The mismanagement of talent : employability and jobs in the knowledge economy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Darr, A. (2002). “The technicization of sales work: an ethnographic study in the US electronics industry.” Work, employment and society. 16(1): 47-65.

Findlay, P., Findlay, J. and Stewart, R. (2009) ‘The consequences of caring: skills, regulation and reward among early years’ workers’ Work, employment and society. 23 (3) pp. 422 - 441

Grugulis, I. and Vincent, S. (2009) Whose skill is it anyway? Soft skills and polarisation  Work, employment and society. 23 (4) pp 597 – 615 December 2009

Hurrell, S. (2016) ‘Rethinking the soft skills deficit blame game: employers, skills withdrawal and the reporting of soft skills gaps’ Human relations. 69 (3) pp. 605 - 628

Lloyd, C. and Payne, J. (2009) ‘‘Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing’: interrogating new skill concepts in service work – the view from two UK call centres’ Work, employment and society 23 (4) 617-634.

Lloyd, C. and Payne, J. (2017) Skills in the age of over-qualification : comparing service sector work in Europe

Noon, M. and Blyton, P. and Morrell, K. (2013) The realities of work, 4th edition, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Payne, J. (1999) ‘ All things to all people: changing perceptions of “skill” among Britain’s policy makers since the 1950s and their implications ’ SKOPE Research Paper No. 1 August Oxford and Warwick Universities: SKOPE (downloadable from the SKOPE website).   

Rees, B.and E. Garnsey. (2003). “Analysing competence: gender and identity at work.” Gender, work and organization. 10(5): 551–578.

Rainbird, H., Fuller, M. And Munro, A. (eds.) (2004) Workplace learning in context London: Routledge Chapter 13.

Thompson, P. Et al. (1995) ‘It ain’t what you do it’s the way that you do it – production organisation and skill utilisation in commercial vehicles’ Work, employment and society. 9(4): 719-742.

Warhurst, C., Grugulis, I. and Keep, E. (eds.) (2004) The skills that matter Basingstoke:Palgrave Chapters 1, 2, 4 and 7. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva Chapter 1 available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva.

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  1. Learning at Work

How and what do people learn at work?  What encourages learning and what limits it?  This session examines the idea of ‘expansive’ and ‘restrictive’ workplaces, communities of practice and the different ways that people may share knowledge and expertise in work.

Core readings

Eraut, M. 2007. "Learning from Other People in the Workplace." Oxford Review of Education 3(4)

Fuller, A.and L. Unwin. 2004. "Expansive learning environments: integrating organisational and personal development." in Workplace Learning in Context, edited by H. Rainbird, A. Fuller, and A. Munro. London and New York: Routledge

Lave, J. and Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning : legitimate peripheral participation , Cambridge University Press.    

Roberts, J. 2006. "Limits to communities of practice." Journal of Management Studies 43(3):623 - 639

Additional readings

Bechky, B. 2006. "Talking About Machines, Thick Description, and Knowledge Work." Organization Studies 27(12):1757 – 1768

Brook, J. Grugulis, I. and Cook, H. (2020) Rethinking situated learning: participation and communities of practice in the UK Fire and Rescue Service Work, Employment and Society 34 (6) pp. 1045 – 1061

Brown, J.S.and P. Duguid. 1991. "Organizational Learning and Communities of Practice: Toward a Unified View of Working, Learning and Innovation." Organization Science 2(1):40 - 57.

Duguid, P. 2006. "What Talking About Machines Tells Us." Organization Studies 27(12):1794 - 1804.

Felstead, A., Fuller, A., Jewson, N. and Unwin, L. (2009). Improving working as learning , Routledge, London and New York.

Grugulis, I.and D. Stoyanova. 2011. "The missing middle: communities of practice in a freelance labour market." Work, Employment and Society 25(2):342 - 351.

Kamoche, K. and Maguire, K. (2011) ‘Pit sense: appropriate of practice based knowledge in a UK coal mine’ Human relations. 64 (5) pp. 725 – 744

Orr, J. 1996. Talking about Machines: an ethnography of a modern job. Ithaca: IRL Press

Orr. 2006. "Ten Years of Talking About Machines." Organization Studies 27(12):1805 - 1820.

 

Pratt, M.G., D.A. Lepisto, and E. Dane. 2018. "The Hidden Side of Trust: Supporting and Sustaining Leaps of Faith among Firefighters." Administrative Science Quarterly.

 Thompson, P. et al (2001) 'Ignorant theory and knowledgeable workers: interrogating the connections between knowledge, service and skills' Journal of management studies. November 38 (7) pp 923 – 942.

 

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  1. Knowledge Work and High Skills

Knowledge work is variously presented as work that demands high (professional) skills or the management of knowledge in the workplace. This session examines knowledge work in practice together with the difference between knowledge work and knowledgeable workers.

Core readings:

Wilkinson, A., Redman, T. and Dundon, T. (2017) Contemporary Human Resource Management, 5th edition, London, Prentice Hall Chapter 18

Grugulis, I. (2007) Skills, training and human resource development : a critical text Houndsmills: Palgrave Chapter 9. Core 

McKinlay, A. (2005). "Knowledge Management." in The Oxford Handbook of Work and Organization, edited by S. Ackroyd, R. Batt, P. Thompson, and P.S. Tolbert. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. Core 

Noon, M. and Blyton, P. and Morrell, K. (2013) The Realities of Work, 4th edition, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Chapter 8. Core 

Thompson, P. et al (2001) 'Ignorant theory and knowledgeable workers: interrogating the connections between knowledge, service and skills' Journal of management studies. November 38 (7) pp 923 – 942.

Additional readings

Alvesson, M.and D. Karreman. (2001). "Odd couple: making sense of the curious concept of knowledge management." Journal of management studies. 38(7):995 - 1018.

Hackley, C. (2000). "Silent running: tacit, discursive and psychological aspects of management in a top UK advertising agency." British journal of management. 11:239 - 254.

Hodgson, D., Paton, S. and Muzio, D. (2015) Something Old, Something New? Competing Logics and the Hybrid Nature of New Corporate Professions  British journal of management., 26(4) 745-759

Kamoche, K. and Maguire, K. (2011) ‘Pit sense: appropriate of practice based knowledge in a UK coal mine’ Human relations. 64 (5) pp. 725 - 744

Konstantinou, E. and Fincham, R. (2011) ‘Not sharing but trading: applying a Maussian exchange framework to knowledge management’ Human relations. 64 (6) pp. 823 - 842

Kunda, G.and G. Ailon-Souday. (2005). "Managers, markets and ideologies: design and devotion revisited." in The Oxford Handbook of Work and Organization, edited by S. Ackroyd, R. Batt, P. Thompson, and P.S. Tolbert. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Nicolini, D. (2007) ‘Stretching out and expanding work practices in time and space: the case of telemedicine’ Human relations. 60 (6) pp. 889 - 920

Robertson, M., H. Scarbrough, and J. Swan (2003). "'Control - what control? ' Culture and ambiguity within a knowledge intensive firm." Journal of management studies. 40(4):831 - 858.

Robertson, M., H. Scarbrough, and J. Swan. (2003). "Knowledge Creation in Professional Service Firms: Institutional Effects." Organization Studies. 24(6):831-857.

Storey, J.and P. Quintas. (2001). "Knowledge management and HRM." in Human Resource Management: a critical text, edited by J. Storey. London: Thomson Learning. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva.

Thompson, P. (2004). " Skating on thin ice:the knowledge economy myth." Glasgow: University of Strathclyde/ Big Thinking.   

Willem, A. and Scarbrough, H. (2006) ‘Social capital and political bias in knowledge sharing: an exploratory study’ Human relations. 59 (10) pp. 1343 - 1370

 

  1. Structures and Skill

The way work is organised at firm level and beyond has significant implications for skill. Traditionally in both the public and private sectors employers would fund skills development for full-time, male workers secure in their internal labour markets and protected by lifetime employment.  Today both of these areas have fragmented with outsourcing, franchises, flexibility, internal markets, freelancers and networks replacing many large, vertically integrated bureaucracies.  This has implications for what skills people require and where, how or even whether they learn them.

Core readings

Bechky, B. 2006. 'Gaffers, gofers and grips: role based co-ordination in temporary organizations'. Organization Science 17: 3 - 21

 

Felstead, A.and D. Ashton. 2000. "Tracing the link: organisational structures and skill demands." Human Resource Management Journal 10(3):5-21.

 

Felstead, A., A. Fuller, N. Jewson, K. Kakavelakis, and L. Unwin. 2007. "Grooving to the same tunes?  Learning, training and productive systems in the aerobics studio." Work, Employment and Society 21(2):189 - 208.

 

Grugulis, I.and S. Vincent. 2005. "Changing boundaries, shaping skills: the fragmented organisational form and employee skills." in Fragmenting Work: blurring organisational boundaries and disordering hierarchies, edited by M. Marchington, D. Grimshaw, J. Rubery, and H. Willmott. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  

 

Kunda, G., S.R. Barley, and J. Evans. 2002. "Why do contractors contract?  The experience of highly skilled technical professionals in a contingent labour market." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 55(2):234-260

Additional readings

Ackroyd, S. and Procter, S. (1998) British Manufacturing Organisation and Workplace Industrial Relations: Some attributes of the New Flexible Firm, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 36(2): 164-183.

Barley, S.R.and G. Kunda. 2004. Gurus, hired guns and warm bodies: itinerant experts in a knowledge economy. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.

Felstead, A., Ashton, D. and Green, F. (2001) ‘Paying the Price for Flexibility? Training, Skills and Non-Standard Jobs in Britain’, International Journal of Employment Studies, 9(1): 25-60.

Felstead, A., A. Fuller, N. Jewson, and L. Unwin. 2009. Improving Working as Learning. London: Routledge.

Grugulis, I., S. Vincent, and G. Hebson. 2003. "The rise of the 'network organisation' and the decline of discretion." Human Resource Management Journal 13(2):45-59.

Kalleberg, A.L. (2003) ‘Flexible Firms and Labour Market Segmentation; Effects of Workplace Restructuring on Jobs and Workers’, Work and occupations., 30(2): 154-75.

Kelliher, C. and Riley, M. (2003) Beyond Efficiency: Some By-products of Functional Flexibility, The Services Industry Journal, 23(4): 98-113. Available online

Payne, J (2011) Fronting Up to skills utilisation: what can we learn from Scotland's skills utilisation projects?, Policy studies., 33 (5); 419-438.

Storey, J., Quintas, P., Taylor, P. and Fowle, W. (2001) ‘ Flexible employment contracts and their implications for product and process innovation’, International journal of human resource management., 13 (1): 1–18.

Whittard, J. and Reeves, K. (2001) Training and Flexible Labour: Nurses in a New South Wales Public Hospital, International Journal of Employment Studies, 9(1): 163-184.

 

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  1. Emotional and Aesthetic Labour

The nature of work has changed with the result that what people feel, the way they look and sound and the feelings they provoke in others have become a legitimate area for managerial control.  What does this involve and what are the implications of this?

Core readings

Grugulis, I. (2007) Skills, training and human resource development : a critical text Houndsmills: Palgrave Chapter 6.

Grugulis, I. (2017) A very short, fairly interesting and reasonably cheap book about HRM London:Sage Chapter 7  

Bolton SC (2000) Emotion here, emotion there, emotional organisations everywhere. Critical Perspectives on Accounting 11(2): 155-171.

Harris, L.C. (2002) ‘The Emotional Labour of Barristers: An Exploration of Emotional Labour by Status Professionals’ Journal of Management Studies 39 (4) pp. 553 – 584

Hochschild A (1979) Emotion work, feeling rules, and the social structure. American Journal of Sociology 85(3): 551-575.

 

Additional readings

Brook P (2009) In critical defence of ‘emotional labour’: refuting Bolton’s critique of Hochschild’s concept. Work, Employment and Society 23(3): 531-548.

Cohen RL (2010) When it pays to be friendly: employment relationships and emotional labour in hairstyling. The Sociological Review 58(2): 197–218.

Gabriel AS and Diefendorff JM (2015) Emotional labor dynamics: A momentary approach. Academy of Management Journal 58(6): 1804-1825.

Hochschild A (1983) The Managed Heart: The Commercialisation of Human Feeling. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Nickson, D., Warhurst, C., Witz, A. and Cullen, A-M. (2001) ‘The importance of being aesthetic: work, employment and service organisation’ in Sturdy, A., Grugulis, I. and Willmott, H. (eds.) Customer Service: empowerment and entrapment Basingstoke:Palgrave

Paules, G.F. (1991) Dishing it Out: power and resistance among waitresses in a New Jersey restaurant Philadelphia:Temple University Press

Warhurst, C. and Nickson, D. (2020) Aesthetic Labour London:Sage

 

  1. Trade Unions, Workplace Learning and Trade Union Learning

What impact do Trade Unions have on learning at work?  Does this compromise their central mission or should we rethink the traditional UK approach?  What did the Union Learning initiative involve and how successful was it?

Core readings

Stuart, M. (2021) ‘The industrial relations of training and development’ in Guile, D. and Unwin, L. The Wiley Handbook of Vocational Education and Training proofs available on Minerva

Stuart, M., Cutter, J., Cook, H., and Winterton, J. (2013) Who stands to gain from union-led learning in Britain? Evidence from surveys of learners, union officers and employers, Economic and industrial democracy., 34 : 227 - 246.

Stuart, M. and Wallis, E. (2007) ‘Partnership-based approaches to learning in the context of restructuring: a seven country study on trade union innovation’, European journal of industrial relations., 13(3): 301-321.

Streeck, W. (1992) ‘Training and the new Industrial Relations: a strategic role for unions? ’, in Regini, M. (ed) The future of labour movements. London: Sage. 250-269. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Additional readings

Buchanan, J., Watson, I. and Briggs, C. (2004) ‘Skill and the renewal of labour: the classical wage-earner model and left productivism in Australia’, in C. Warhurst., I Grugulis. And E. Keep (eds) The skills that matter. Palgrave MacMillan. 186-206

Clough, B. (2012) ‘The role and impact of unions on learning and skills policy and practice: a review of the research’, Research Paper 12, London: unionlearn. Available online: https://www.unionlearn.org.uk/sites/default/files/publication/Research%20Paper%2016.pdf

Clough, B. (2010) ‘Union Learning Representatives: State Agents or Social Partners? ’, Labour & industry : a journal of the social and economic relations of work., The Journal of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand, 21(2): 495–512. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Heyes, J. (2007) ‘Training, social dialogue and collective bargaining in Western Europe’, Economic and industrial democracy., 28(2): 239-258.

Hyman, R. (2005). Trade unions and the politics of the European social model, Economic and industrial democracy. 26(1): 9-40.

Lloyd C. and Payne J. (2006) ‘ British Trade Unions and the Learning and Skills Agenda: an assessment’, SKOPE Issues, Paper 12. - Available online: http://www.skope.ox.ac.uk/?person=british-trade-unions-and-the-learning-and-skills-agenda-an-assessment   

McIlroy, J. (2008) “Ten years of New Labour: Workplace learning, social partnership and union revitalisation in Britain”, British Journal of Industrial Relations., 46(2): 283–313.

Rainbird, H. and Stuart, M. (2011) The state and the union learning agenda in Britain, Work, employment and society., 25(2): 202-217.

Wallis, E., Stuart, M. and Greenwood, I. (2005) ‘‘Learners of the workplace unite!’ An empirical examination of the UK Trade Union Learning Representative’, Work, employment and society., 19(2): 283-304.

Warhurst,C., Mayhew, K., Finegold, D., and Buchanan (2017) 'The Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training', Oxford, Oxford University Press.  Chapter 12

 Winterton, J. (2007) ‘Building Social Dialogue over Training and Learning: European and National Developments’, European journal of industrial relations., 2007; 13: 281-300.

 Top of page

  1. Skill and Performance, Theories of Skill

Core reading

Cutler, T. (1992) ‘Vocational training and British economic performance: a further instalment of the British Labour Problem’, Work, employment and society., 6 (2).

Felstead, A., Gallie, D., Green, F. and Zhou, Y. ( 2007 ) Skills at Work 1986–2006. Oxford: SKOPE and ESRC. - Available online: https://orca.cf.ac.uk/68042/1/Skills%20at%20Work,%201986%20to%202006.pdf

Grugulis, I. and Stoyanova, D. (2011) ‘Skill and Performance’, British Journal of Industrial Relations., 49 (3): 515–536.

Harley, B. (2005) ‘Hope or Hype? High-Performance Work Systems’, in B. Harley, J. Hyman and P. Thompson (eds), Participation and democracy at work : essays in honour of Harvie Ramsay. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Keep, E. Mayhew, K. and Corney, M. (2002), ' Review of the Evidence on the Rate of Returns to Employers of Investment in Training and Employer Training Measures '. Department of Trade and Industry, London: dti. - Available online: http://www.skope.ox.ac.uk/?person=review-of-the-evidence-of-the-rate-of-return-to-employers-of-investment-in-training-and-employer-training-measures   

Machin, S. and Vignoles, A. (2001) ‘ The Economic Benefits of Training to the Individual, the Firm and the Economy: the Key Issues ’, Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics, Conference paper, April. - Available online: http://www.voced.edu.au/content/ngv%3A5528

Mason, G. and Wagner, K. (2002) Skills, performance and new technologies in the British and German automotive components industries, Department for Education and Skills, London: DfES.   

Additional reading

Ashton, D. and Green, F. (1996) Education, training, and the global economy. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. Chapter 3.

Felstead, A., Green, F. and Mayhew, K. (1997) Getting the measure of training : a report on training statistics in Britain Centre for Industrial Policy and Performance, University of Leeds.

Green, F. (2010) ‘ Unions and Skills Utilisation ’, Research Paper 11, London: unionlearn.

Heyes, J. and Stuart, M. (1996) ‘Does training matter? Employee experiences and attitudes’, Human resource management journal., Vol.6, No.3

Lloyd, C. and Payne, J. (2002) ' In Search of the High Skills Society: Some Reflections on Current Visions' . SKOPE Working Paper 32, Oxford and Warwick Universities - Available online: http://www.skope.ox.ac.uk/?person=in-search-of-the-high-skills-society-some-reflections-on-current-visions   

Prais, S.J. (1995) Productivity, education and training : an international perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Steedman, H. and Wagner, K. (1989) ‘Productivity, machinery and skills: clothing manufacture in Britain and Germany’, National Institute economic review.., No. 128, 40-57.

Tamkin, P. (2005) The Contribution of Skills to Business Performance Brighton: IES https://www.employment-studies.co.uk/system/files/resources/files/rw39.pdf

  1. The Future of Skill

All predictions of the future are wrong, including this one.  It is not difficult to identify overly optimistic, unrealistic and simply foolish predictions of what might happen.  In this session, instead of ungrounded speculation, we will be encouraging you to look at current trends and think of the implications for people, for HRM and for skill if these continue.  Some are suggested here but you may wish to choose your own.

 

Grugulis, I. (2017) A very short, fairly interesting and reasonably cheap book about human resource management London:Sage Chapter Eight  

Paul Thompson and Harry Pitts Bullshit about jobs, Royal Society of Arts, 9 July 2018 https://www.thersa.org/discover/publications-and-articles/rsa-blogs/2018/07/bullshit-about-jobs

Algorithmic Control and Automation

Kellogg, K.C., Valentine, M.A. and Christin, A. (2020) ‘Algorithms at work: the New Contested Terrain of Control’ Academy of Management Annals 14 (1) pp. 366 – 410

Moore S and Newsome K (2018) Paying for free delivery: Dependent self-employment as a measure of precarity in parcel delivery. Work, Employment and Society 32(3): 475-492

Pettersen L (2018) Why Artificial Intelligence Will Not Outsmart Complex Knowledge Work. Work, Employment and Society 33(6): 1058-1067

Wood AJ, Graham M, Lehdonvirta V and Hjorth I (2019) Good gig, bad gig: autonomy and algorithmic control in the global gig economy. Work, Employment and Society 33(1): 56–75.

The Economist on automation

https://www.economist.com/business/2021/01/16/after-years-of-dithering-companies-are-embracing-automation?utm_campaign=the-economist-today&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_source=salesforce-marketing-cloud&utm_term=2021-01-14&utm_content=article-image-3&etear=nl_today_3

Brexit

O’Reilly et al. (2016) ‘Brexit: understanding the socio-economic origins and consequences’ Socio-Economic Review 14 (4) pp. 807 - 854

How the Brexit deal threatens rights at work

https://www.ier.org.uk/comments/how-the-brexit-deal-threatens-your-rights-at-work/

An academic blog:

https://chrisgreybrexitblog.blogspot.com/

Covid

The Economist on the unequal risks of Covid infection by race/jobs and government investment into systems under Covid

https://www.economist.com/leaders/2020/12/19/the-year-when-everything-changed?fsrc=newsletter&utm_campaign=the-economist-today&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_source=salesforce-marketing-cloud&utm_term=2020-12-16&utm_content=article-link-2&etear=nl_today_2

The Women’s Budget Group

https://wbg.org.uk/topics/covid-19/

McKinsey

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/mckinsey-accelerate/our-insights/accelerate-blog/thriving-after-covid-19-what-skills-do-employees-need

 

 

 

 

 

This list was last updated on 28/01/2021