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COMM2910
Module Reading List

Communication Research Methods, 2021/22, Semester 2
Todd Graham
T.Graham@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Useful Methods Textbooks

This is a list of very good textbooks on research methods. They all cover similiar material but the writing and teaching style/method varies. If you had difficulties with the required reading, consider conculting one of these textbooks. For example, if you had difficulties reading the Bryman book on Sampling in Week 4, consult, for example, the chapter on Sampling in the Babbie book or May book below. 

Anderson, J.A. (2012). Media Research Methods: Understanding Metric and Interpretive Approaches. London: Sage Publications. 

Babbie, E. (2020). The Practice of Social Research (15th Edition). Boston, MA: Cengage.

Berger, A.A. (2018). Media and Communication Research Methods (5th Edition). London: SAGE Publications. 

Clark, T., Foster, L., Sloan, L., & Bryman, A. (2021). Bryman's Social Research Methods (6th Edition). London: Oxford University Press.

Dawson, C. (2019). Introduction to Research Methods: A Practical Guide for Anyone Undertaking a Research Project (5th Edition). London: Robinson.     

Deacon, D., Murdock, G., Pickering, M., & Golding, P. (2021). Researching Communications: A Practical Guide to Methods in Media and Cultural Analysis (3rd Edition). London: Bloomsbury Academic. 

Hansen, A. & Machin, D. (2019). Media and Communication Research Methods (2nd Edition). London: Red Globe Press. 

Lindlof, T.R. & Taylor, B.C. (2017). Qualitative Communication Research Methods (4th Edition). London: Sage Publications. 

May, T. (2011). Social Research: Issues, Methods, and Process. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Treadwell, D. & Davis, A. (2019). Introducing Communication Research: Paths of Inquiry (4th Edition). London: Sage Publications.

 

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Week 1. Module Introduction  

Required (core) reading

Bryman, A. (2016). Social Research Methods (5th Edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Read Chapter 1 - The Nature and Process of Social Research.    6th edition available here

Supplementary reading

Hansen, A. & Machin, D. (2019). Media and Communication Research Methods (2nd Edition). London: Red Globe Press. Read Chapter 2 - The Research Process.  

 

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Week 2. Research Strategy and Design

Required (core) reading

Deacon, D., Pickering, M., Golding, P., & G. Murdock. (1999). ‘Approaching research’ (Chapter 1).  Researching Communications: A practical guide to methods in media and cultural analysis, pp. 1–13. London: Arnold. Available as an Online Course reading in the VLE   

Available in the ‘Online Course Readings Folder’ in the Learning Resources section of Minerva. 

Supplementary reading

Bryman, A. 2016. ‘Social research strategies: quantitative research and qualitative research’ (Chapter 2),  Social research methods. 5th edition. pp. 16-39.  

Bryman, A. 2016. ‘Research design’ (Chapter 3),  Social research methods. 5th edition. pp. 39-72.  

Creswell, J. 2014.The selection of a research approach’ (Chapter 1), Research design: qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches, 4th ed. London: Sage. Chapter 1, pp. 3-25. 

Jensen, K. B. 2012. 'The complementarity of qualitative and quantitative methodologies in media and communication research' (Chapter 15). In: K. B Jensen (ed,)  A Handbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative and quantitative methodologies  London: Routledge. Chapter 15, 254-273. 

May, T. 2011. ‘Perspectives on social scientific research’ (Chapter 1), Social research: issues, methods, and process. Buckingham: Open University Press, 4th Edition. Chapter 1. pp. 5-26.

Pluckrose, H. & Lindsay, J. (2020). Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything about Race, Gender, and Identity―and Why This Harms Everybody. Durham, NC: Pitchstone Publishing. (Challenges epistemological and ontological basis of various fields of research that draw from post modern theories.)  

 

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Week 3. Research Ethics

Required (core) reading

Babbie, E. (2020). The Practice of Social Research (15th Edition). Boston, MA: Cengage. Read Chapter 3 - The Ethics and Politics of Social Research.  

Franzke, A.S., Bechmann, A., Zimmer, M., Ess, C. & AoIR (2020). Internet Research: Ethical Guidelines 3.0. (pp. 1-24). https://aoir.org/reports/ethics3.pdf  

Supplementary reading

Bryman, A. 2016. Social research methods. 5th edition. Chapter 6, pp. 120-146.  

Humphreys, L. 1970. “Tearoom trade: Impersonal sex in public places.”  Trans-action 3 (January), 10–25. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva Available as an Online Course reading in the VLE 

Jones, C. 2011 Ethical issues in online research, British Educational Research Association on-line resource. Available on-line at https://www.bera.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Ethical-issues-in-online-research.pdf

Markham, E. & Buchanan, E. 2012. Ethical decision-making and internet research: recommendations from the AoIR ethics working committee (Version 2.0). Available online at: http://aoir.org/reports/ethics2.pdf

May, T. 2011. Social research: issues, methods, and process. Buckingham: Open University Press, 4th Edition. Chapter 3, 46-70.  

Miller, T., et al. 2012. “Introduction.” Ethics in Qualitative Research, 1–13. London: Sage.

Townsend, L and Wallace, C. 2016. Social media research: A guide To ethics. Available from: http://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_487729_en.pdf

University of Leeds. 2020. Research Ethics Policy. University of Leeds Website [Online] Available from: http://ris.leeds.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Research_Ethics_Policy.pdf

University of Leeds Research and Innovation Service. 2016. Ethics. University of Leeds Website [Online] Available from: http://ris.leeds.ac.uk/info/70/ethics.

 

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Week 4. Sampling in Quantitative and Qualitative Research

Required (core) reading

Bryman, A. (2016). Social Research Methods (5th Edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Read Chapter 8 - Sampling in Quantitative Research.    6th edtion available here

Bryman, A. (2016). Social Research Methods (5th Edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Read Chapter 18 - Sampling in Qualitative Research.   6th edition available here

Supplementary reading

Treadwell, D. & Davis, A. (2019). Sampling: Who, what, and how many? (Chapter 6), Introducing Communication Research: Paths of Inquiry (4th Edition). London: Sage Publications, pp. 108–128.

Lindlof, T.R., & Taylor, B.C. (2017). Design I: Planning research projects (Chapter 4), Qualitative Communication Research Methods (4th Edition). London: Sage Publications, pp. 142–151 (Sampling).

 

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Week 5. Experimental Methods

Required (core) reading

Babbie, E. (2020). The Practice of Social Research (15th Edition). Boston, MA: Cengage. Read Chapter 8 - Experiments.  

Cohen R, Fardouly J, Newton-John T, Slater A. 2019. #BoPo on Instagram: An experimental investigation of the effects of viewing body positive content on young women’s mood and body image. New Media & Society. 21(7): 1546-1564.  

Supplementary reading (method)

Coleman, R. 2018. Designing Experiments for the Social Sciences: How to Plan, Create, and Execute Research Using Experiments. London: SAGE.

Livingsone, S. 1996. On the continuing problems of media effects research. In: J. Curran and M. Gurevitch (eds) Mass media and society, 2nd Edition. London, UK. pp. 305–324.

Peer, E., Brandimarte, L., Samat, S., & Acquisti, A. 2017. Beyond the Turk: Alternative platforms for crowdsourcing behavioral research. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. , 70, 153-163.

Ross, S. M. & Morrison, G. R. 2004. Experimental research methods. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Educational communications and Technology ( 2nd ed.) (pp. 1021– 1043). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Russ-Eft, D., & Hoover, A. L. 2005. Experimental and quasi-experimental designs. Research in organizations : foundations and methods of inquiry ISBN: 9781576753149 (hbk.); 157675314X (hbk.); 9781576750752, 75-95.

Sørensen, F., Mattsson, J., & Sundbo, J. 2010. Experimental methods in innovation research. Research policy. , 39(3), 313-322.

Treadwell, D., & Davis, A. 2020. Experiments: Researching Cause and Effect (Chapter 10). Introducing communication research: paths of inquiry (Fourth edition.). London: SAGE.

Supplementary reading (examples)

Acquisti, A. and Fong, C. M. 2015. An Experiment in Hiring Discrimination Via Online Social Networks. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2031979 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2031979

Acquisti, A., John, L. K., & Loewenstein, G. 2013. What is privacy worth? The journal of legal studies. ISSN: 0047-2530, 42(2), 249-274.

Amabile, T. M., Goldfarb, P., & Brackfleld, S. C. 1990. Social influences on creativity: Evaluation, coaction, and surveillance. Creativity research journal ISSN: 1040-0419, 3(1), 6-21.

Bechtold, S., Buccafusco, C., & Springman, C. J. 2015. Innovation heuristics: experiments on sequential creativity in intellectual property. Indiana Law Journal ISSN: 0019-6665 91, 1251.

Giorcelli, Michela, and Petra Moser. 2015. Copyright and Creativity, Evidence from Italian Operas. Available at http://ssrn.com/abstract=2505776, 1-59.

Hamari, J. 2013. Transforming homo economicus into homo ludens: A field experiment on gamification in a utilitarian peer-to-peer trading service. Electronic commerce research and applications. ISSN: 1567-4223, 12(4), 236-245

Tiggemann, Marika, and Isabella Anderberg. 2020. ‘Social Media Is Not Real: The Effect of “Instagram vs Reality” Images on Women’s Social Comparison and Body Image’. New Media & Society 22(12): 2183–99. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444819888720.

 

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Week 6. Surveys

Required (core) reading

Hansen, A. & Machin, D. (2019). Media and Communication Research Methods (2nd Edition). London: Red Global Press. Read Chapter 9 - Survey Research.  

Strömbäck, J. 2016. Does public service TV and the intensity of the political information environment matter? Journalism studies. , pp.1–18.  

Supplementary reading (method)

Bryman, A. 2016. ‘Structured Interviewing; (Chapter 9), Social research methods, Fifth Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 197-219.

Bryman, A. 2016. ‘Self-Completion Questionairres’ (Chapter 10), Social research methods, Fifth Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 220-242. 

Bryman, A. 2016. ‘Quantitative Data Analysis’ (Chapter 15), Social research methods, Fifth Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 329-351

Deacon, D., Pickering, M., Golding, P., & G. Murdock. 1999. Researching Communications. A practical guide to methods in media and cultural analysis, London: Arnold. Chapter 4, pp. 62-80.

Fink, A. & Kosecoff, J. 2006. How to conduct surveys: A step-by-step guide, Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Galazinski, D. & Kozlowski, O. 2010. Questionnaires and lived experience: Strategies of coping with a quantitative frame. Qualitative inquiry. 16(4): 271-284.

Leddy-Own, C. 2016. Questionnaire design (Chapter 13). In: Gilbert, N. & Stoneman, P. (eds). Researching Social Life. 4th ed. London: SAGE, pp. 239-258.

May, T. and Sutton. C. 2011. Social research: issues, methods and process, 4th ed. Buckingham: Open University Press. Chapter 5, pp. 93-131

Zaller, J., and Feldman, S. 1992. A simple theory of the survey response: Answering questions versus revealing preferences. American journal of political science. 36(3), 579–616.

Supplementary reading (examples)

Berinsky, A. J. 1999. The two faces of public opinion. American journal of political science. , 43(4), pp. 1209-1230.

Daschmann, Gregor (2000) Vox pop & polls. The impact of poll results and voter statements in the media on the perception of a climate of opinion. International journal of public opinion research. , 12(2), pp. 160-181.

Esser, F., de Vreese, C.H., 2007. Comparing young voters’ political engagement in the United States and Europe. The American Behavioral Scientist, 50(9): 1195-1213.

Helsper, E.J. and Reisdorf, B.C. 2016. The emergence of a ‘digital underclass’ in Great Britain and Sweden: Changing reasons for digital exclusion. New media and society. , pp. 1-18.

Nielsen, R.K. and Schrøder, K.C. 2014. The relative importance of social media for accessing, finding, and engaging with news: an eight-country cross-media comparison. Digital journalism. 2(4), pp. 472–489. - Available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/21670811.2013.872420

Soroka, S., Andrew, B., Aalberg, T., Iyengar, S., Curran, J., Coen, S., Hayashi, K., Jones, P., Mazzoleni, G., Rhee, J.W. and others 2013. Auntie knows best? Public broadcasters and current affairs knowledge. British journal of political science. . 43(04),pp.719–739.

 

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Week 7. Content Analysis (Deductive Coding)

Required (core) reading

Clark, T., Foster, L., Sloan, L., & Bryman, A. (2021). Bryman's Social Research Methods (6th Edition). London: Oxford University Press. Read Chapter 13 - Content Analysis.  

Graham, T., Jackson, D. and Broersma, M. 2016. New platform, old habits? Candidates’ use of Twitter during the 2010 British and Dutch general election campaigns. New media and society. 18(5), pp.765–783.  

Supplementary reading (method)

Berger, A. A. 2016. Media and communication research methods: An introduction to qualitative and quantitative approaches. 4th edition. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE. Chapter 12, pp. 271-288.  

Deacon, D., Pickering, M., Golding, P., & G. Murdock. 2007. Researching communications: A practical guide to methods in media and cultural analysis. London: Bloomsbury Academic.  Chapter 6, pp. 117-137.

Krippendorff, K. 2018. Content Analysis: An Introduction to Its Methodology (4th Edition). London: Sage.

Macnamara, J.R. 2005. Media content analysis: Its uses, benefits and best practice methodology. Asia Pacific Public Relations Journal, 6(1): 1–34. Available at https://search.informit.org/doi/epdf/10.3316/ielapa.200705762

Mayring, P. 2013. Qualitative Content Analysis. Theoretical Foundation and Basic Procedures.

Neuendorf, K.A. 2016. The Content Analysis Guidebook (2nd Edition). London: Sage.

Riffe, D., Lacy, S., Watson, B.R., & Fico, F. 2019. Analyzing Media Messages: Using Quantitative Content Analysis in Research (4th Edition). London: Routledge.

Supplementary reading (examples)

Adi, A., Erickson, K., & Lilleker, D. G. 2014. Elite tweets: Analyzing the Twitter communication patterns of Labour party peers in the House of Lords. Policy and Internet, 6(1), 1-27.

Brems C., Temmerman M., Graham T., & Broersma M. (2017). Personal branding on Twitter: How employed and freelance journalists stage themselves on social media. Digital Journalism, 5(4): 443–459.

Cushion, S. and Lewis, J. 2009. Towards a ‘Foxification’ of 24-hour news channels in Britain? An analysis of market-driven and publicly funded news coverage. Journalism. . 10(2), pp.131–153.

Cushion, S., Thomas, R. and Ellis, O. 2015. Interpreting UKIP’s ‘earthquake’ in British politics: UK television news coverage of the 2009 and 2014 EU election campaigns. The political quarterly. . 86(2), pp.314–322.

Graham, T., Broersma, M., Hazelhoff, K., & Van'T Haar, G. (2013). Between broadcasting political messages and interacting with voters: The use of Twitter during the 2010 UK general election campaign. Information, Communication & Society, 16(5): 692–716.

Graham, T., D. Jackson, and S. Wright. 2016. We need to get together and make ourselves heard: everyday online spaces as incubators of political action. Information, communication and society. 19(10): 1373–89

Wright S., Jackson D., & Graham T. (2020). When journalists go “below the line”: Comment spaces at The Guardian (2006–2017). Journalism Studies, 21(1): 107–126.

 

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Week 8. Ethnography and Participant Observation

Required (core) reading

Hansen, A. & Machin, D. (2019). Media and Communication Research Methods (2nd Edition). London: Red Global Press. Read Chapter 4 - Ethnography and Observational Methods.  

Wahl-Jorgensen, K. (2002). The construction of the public in letters to the editor: Deliberative democracy and the idiom of insanity. Journalism, 3(2): 183–204.  Available online 

Supplementary reading (method)

Berger, A.A. 2014. Media and communication research methods: an introduction to qualitative and quantitative approaches, Chapter 10, pp. 215-228. 

Bryman, A. 2012. Social research methods. 4th Edition. Oxford University Press: Oxford. Chapter 19, pp. 430-466; see also short section on 'Online ethnography' in Chapter 28, pp. 659-668.

Hansen, A. 1998. Mass communication research methods. Macmillan: Basingstoke, Chapter 3, pp. 35-65

Hine, C. (2015). Ethnography for the Internet: Embedded, Embodied and Everyday. London: Bloomsbury Academic.

Kozinets, R.V. 2015. Netnography: Redefined. London: SAGE Publications.

Machin, D. 2002. Ethnographic research for media studies. Arnold: London.

Skeggs, B. 1995. Theorising, ethics and representation in feminist ethnography, in B. Skeggs (ed) Feminist cultural theory : process and production . Manchester University Press: Manchester, pp. 190-206.  Available as an Online Course reading in the VLE

Supplementary reading (examples)

Coleman, G. 2010. The hacker conference: A ritual condensation and celebration of a lifeworld. Anthropological Quarterly, 47-72.

Hesmondhalgh D, Baker S. 2008, Creative work and emotional labour in the television industry. Theory, Culture & Society. 25(7-8), pp. 97-118.

Hine, C. 2011. Towards ethnography of television on the internet: A mobile strategy for exploring mundane interpretive activities. Media, culture & society. , 33(4), 567-582.  

Humphreys, L, 1970. Tearoom trade: Impersonal sex in public places, in Trans-action. , 7 (3): 10-25. Available as an Online Course reading in the VLE 

Murphy, P.D. 2011. Locating Media Ethnography, In: V. Nightingale, (ed.) The handbook of media audiences . Wiley Blackwell: London, pp.380-401 (e-book).

Paterson, C. and Domingo, D. 2008. Making online news : the ethnography of new media production , Volume 1. Peter Lang: New York. See especially Chapter 1, pp. 1-15.

Tuchman, G. (1972). Making News: A Study in the Construction of Reality. New York: Free Press.

Whyte, W. 1993. ‘Cornerville and its people’. Street corner society: The social structure of an Italian slum, 4th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. iv–xx. Available as an Online Course reading in the VLE

Zeng W, Sparks C. 2019. Production and politics in Chinese television. Media, Culture & Society. 41(1):54-69. 

 

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Week 9. Qualitative Interviews and Focus Groups

Required (core) reading

Brennen, B. (2017). Qualitative Methods for Media Studies (2nd Edition). London: Routledge. Read Chapter 3 - Interviewing.  

Toff, B. & Nielsen, R.K. (2018). 'I Just Google It': Folk theories of distributed discovery. Journal of Communication, 68(3): 636–657.   

Supplementary reading (method)

Brennen, B. 2017. ‘Focus groups’ (Chapter 4), Qualitative methods for media studies, 2nd Edition. London: Routledge, pp. 61-96.

Bryman, A. 2016. ‘Interviewing in qualitative research’ (Chapter 20), Social research methods, Fifth Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 465-499,

Bryman, A. 2016. ‘Focus groups’ (Chapter 21), Social research methods, Fifth Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 500-520.

Figenschou, T. 2010. Young, female, Western researcher vs. senior, male, Al Jazeera officials: Critical reflections on accessing and interviewing media elites in authoritarian societies. Media, culture & society. 32(6), 961–978.

Fontana, A., and Prokos, A. H. 2007. Interviewing in perspective. The interview : from formal to postmodern . Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press, pp. 9–14. Available as an Online Course reading in the VLE 

Hansen, A. and Machin, D. 2018. ‘Focus group interviewing’ (Chapter 10). Media and communication research methods. London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 227-253.

Holstein, J. and Gubruim, J. 2011. Active interviewing. In: Silverman, D. (Ed.) Qualitative research: theory, method and practice. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

Kvale, S. 1996. Interviews : an introduction to qualitative research interviewing . London: Sage.

Leech, B. 2002. Asking questions: techniques for semi-structured interviews. PS : political science and politics. , 35 (4), pp. 665-668.

Lunt, P. and Livingstone, S. 1996. Rethinking the focus group in media and communications research. Journal of communication. ISSN: 0021-9916, 46: 79–98. doi:10.1111/j.1460-2466.1996.tb01475.x.

May, T. 2011. 'Interviewing: methods and process' (Chapter 6) Social research: issues, methods and process, 4th ed. Buckingham: Open University Press. pp. 131-161.

Supplementary reading (examples)

Allen, K. and Mendick, H. 2013. Keeping it real?: social class, young people and authenticity in reality TV. Sociology. 47(3), pp. 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1177/0038038512448563

Coleman, S, and G. Moss. 2016. ‘Rethinking election debates: what citizens are entitled to expect’. The International Journal of Press/Politics, 21(1): 3–24.

Edwards, Lee, Klein, Bethany, Lee, David, Moss, Giles and Philip, Fiona (2015) Isn’t it just a way to protect Walt Disney’s rights?: Media user perspectives on copyright. New media and society, 17 (5). pp. 691-707.

Firmstone, J. and Coleman, S. 2014. The changing role of the local news media in enabling citizens to engage in local democracies. Journalism practice . 8(5), pp. 596–606.

Lee D. 2012. The Ethics of Insecurity: Risk, Individualization and Value in British Independent Television Production. Television & New Media. 2012;13(6):480-497.

O’Brien, A. 2014. ‘Men own television’: why women leave media work. Media, culture & society. . 36(8),pp.1207–1218.

Marwick, A. E. & boyd, d. 2014. Networked privacy: How teenagers negotiate context in social media, New media and society. , Vol. 16(7) 1051–1067.

Vares, T. et al. 2011. Preteen girls read ‘tween’ popular culture: diversity, complexity and contradiction. International journal of media and cultural politics. 7(2).

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Week 10. Grounded Theory (Inductive Coding)

Required (core) reading

Clark, T., Foster, L., Sloan, L., & Bryman, A. (2021).  Bryman's Social Research Methods (6th Edition). London: Oxford University Press. Read Chapter 23 - Qualitative Data Analysis.  

Titscher, S. Meyer, M., Wodak, R., & Vetter, E. (2000). Methods of Text and Discourse Analysis. London: Sage Publications. Read Chapter 6 - Grounded Theory.  

Supplementary reading (method)

Charmaz, K. 2014. Constructing Grounded Theory (2nd Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Corbin, J., & Strauss, A. (2008).Basics of qualitative research : Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. 

Martin, V. B., Scott, C., Brennen, B., & Durham, M. G. (2018). What Is Grounded Theory Good For? Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 95(1), 11–22. 

 

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Week 11. Discourse Analysis

Required (core) reading

Wetherell, M. (2001). Themes in discourse research: The case of Diana. In M. Wetherell et al. (eds.), Discourse Theory and Practice. London: Sage Publications, pp. 14–28.   Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Wetherell, M.M. & Potter, J. (1988). Discourse analysis and the identification of interpretative repertoires (Chapter 12). In C. Antaki (ed.), Analysing Everyday Explanation: A Case Book. London: Sage Publications, pp. 168–183.   Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva     

Antaki, C. et al. (2002). Discourse analysis means doing analysis. Discourse Analysis On-line, http://extra.shu.ac.uk/daol/articles/v1/n1/a1/antaki2002002-paper.html   

Supplementary reading (method)

Bryman, A. 2016. Qualitative data analysis (Chapter 22), Social Research Methods (5th Edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 525–544.

Fairclough, N. 2003. Analysing discourse: Textual analysis for social research ISBN: 0415258936 (pbk); 0415258928 ISBN: 9780415674263. London: Routledge.

Gee, J.P. 2014. An Introduction to Discourse Analysis: Theory and Method (4th Edition). London: Routledge. 

Gee, J.P. 2014. How to do Discourse Analysis: A Toolkit (2nd Edition). London: Routledge. 

Machin, D. and Mayr. A. 2012. How to do critical discourse analysis : a multimodal introduction . London: SAGE. Introduction, pp, 1-15. Available as an Online Course reading  

Matheson, D. 2005. Media Discourse: Analysing Media Texts. Berkshire, UK: Open University Press. 

Potter, J. 1997. ‘Discourse Analysis as a Way of Analysing Naturally Occurring Talk’, in D. Silverman (ed.), Qualitative Research: Theory, Method and Practice. London: SAGE Publications.

Potter, J. 2004. Discourse analysis. In M. Hardy & A. Bryman (eds.), Handbook of Data Analysis. London: SAGE Publications. 

Potter, J., and Hepburn, A. (2012). ‘Discourse Analysis’, in S. Becker, A. Bryman, and H. Ferguson (eds), Understanding Research: Methods and Approaches for Social Work and Social Policy. Bristol: Policy Press.

Potter, J., and Wetherell, M. 1987. Discourse and Social Psychology: Beyond Attitudes and Behaviour. London: Sage.

Potter, J., and Wetherell, M. 1994. ‘Analyzing Discourse’, in A. Bryman and R. G. Burgess (eds), Analyzing Qualitative Data. London: Routledge.

Richardson, J. E. 2007. Analysing newspapers: An approach from critical discourse analysis . Chapter 2. 

Supplementary reading (examples)

Billig, M. 2002. Talking of the Royal Family. Routledge.

Gilbert, G. N., and Mulkay, M. 1984. Opening Pandora’s Box: A Sociological Analysis of Scientists’ Discourse. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Macdonald, M. 2003 Exploring media discourse. Arnold. Chapter 6 ‘Unsafe Food’.

Machin, D. and Thornborrow, J. 2003. Branding and discourse: The case of Cosmopolitan. Discourse & society. ISSN: 0957-9265. 14(4),pp.453–471.

Potter, J., and Hepburn, A. 2004. ‘The Analysis of NSPCC Call Openings’, in S. Becker and A. Bryman (eds), Understanding Research for Social Policy and Practice: Themes, Methods, and Approaches. Bristol: Policy Press.

Stoegner, K. and Wodak, R. 2016. ‘The man who hated Britain’–the discursive construction of ‘national unity in the Daily Mail. Critical discourse studies ISSN: 1740-5904; 1740-5912. 13(2),pp.193–209.

 

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Assessment 1

You will write a critical review of the methodology of one of the following studies:

Strömbäck, J. (2016). Does public service TV and the intensity of the political information environment matter? Journalism Studies, 18(11): 1–18.

Meeks, L. (2016). Gendered styles, gendered differences: Candidates’ use of personalization and interactivity on Twitter. Journal of Information Technology & Politics, 13(4): 295–310,

Zeng, W. & Sparks, C. (2019). Production and politics in Chinese television. Media, Culture & Society. 41(1): 54–69.

Toff, B. & Nielsen, R.K. (2018). ‘I Just Google It’: Folk theories of distributed discovery. Journal of Communication, 68(3): 636–657.

To help you prepare for this assessment, you will complete a 400-word non-assessed, formative critical review in Week 5 of the methodological approach adopted in the following article:

Cohen, R., Fardouly, J., Newton-John, T., & Slater, A. (2019). #BoPo on Instagram: An experimental investigation of the effects of viewing body positive content on young women’s mood and body image. New Media & Society. 21(7): 1546–1564.

 

This list was last updated on 03/03/2022