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PIED2558
Reading List

Security Studies, 2021/22, Semester 2
Dr Jack Holland
j.holland@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Week 1: What was security? Historiography     

All students should read: 

‘Introduction’ in Jarvis and Holland, Security: A Critical Introduction, Palgrave. (This is a ‘medium hard’ intro)

You may also like: 

‘An introduction to security studies’ in Williams (and McDonald) eds, Security Studies: An Introduction, Routledge. (This is an easier intro)

More advanced reading:

Barry Buzan and Lene Hansen (2009), The evolution of international security studies, (Cambridge University Press), particularly the Introduction and Chapters 1 and 2

Miller, Steven E. (2010), ‘The Hegemonic Illusion? Traditional Strategic Studies in Context’, Security Dialogue, 41: 6

Stephen M. Walt, ‘The Renaissance of Security Studies’, International studies quarterly., 35:2, 1991

Richard Betts, ‘Should Strategic Studies Survive? ’, World politics., 50:1, 1997

Wæver, Ole. "Aberystwyth, Paris, Copenhagen." New schools in Security (2004). http://www.udc.edu.br/libwww/udc/uploads/uploadsMateriais/08052018165824Waever,%20Ole%20(2004)%20Aberystwyth,%20Paris,%20Copenhagen_New%20Schools%20in%20Security%20Theory%20and%20Their%20Origins%20Between%20Core%20and%20Periphery.pdf

 

Week 2: What is security? Ontology

The background lecture reading for this week is: 

‘Chapter 1 - What is Security?’ in Jarvis and Holland, Security: A Critical Introduction, Palgrave.

Compulsory group seminar readings: 

Group 1: Can security be defined? What have been the contexts of calls to redefine security? What are the differences between ‘broadening’ and ‘deepening’ security?

Smith, S., ‘The contested concept of security’ in Booth (ed.), Critical Security Studies (Lynne Rienner, 2005). In Minerva folder.

Krause, K. and M. C. Williams, ‘Broadening the Agenda of Security Studies: Politics and Methods’, Mershon International Studies Review, 40:6 (1996), 229-54.

Group 2: Is security emancipation? What does thinking of security in terms of emancipation add? Should the goal of security theorists be to make the world better?

Booth, K., ‘Security and Emancipation’, Review of International Studies, 17-4 (1991), 313-26.

Neufeld, M., ‘Pitfalls of Emancipation and Discourses of Security’, International Relations, 18:1 (2004), 109-23.

Group 3: Is security a speech act?

Buzan, B. et al., ‘Chapter 2 – Security analysis: conceptual apparatus’, in Security: A New Framework for Analysis (Lynne Reinner, 1998). In Minerva folder

Waever, O., ‘Securitisation and de-securitisation’ in R. Lipschutz (ed.), On Security (Columbia UP, 1995). In Minerva folder

 

Other textbook introductions: 

Williams, P., ‘Security Studies: An Introduction’, in Williams (ed), Security Studies: an introduction (Routledge).

Fierke, K. Critical Approaches to International Security (Polity). Chapter 1.

Collins, A., ‘What is Security Studies?’ in Collins (ed.), Contemporary Security Studies (Oxford UP, 2018). In Minerva folder

On defining security:

Huysmans, J, ‘Security! What do you mean? From Concept to Thick Signifier’, European Journal of International Relations, 4:2 (1998), 226-55.

Smith, S., ‘The Increasing Insecurity of Security Studies’, Contemporary Security Policy, 20:3 (1999), 72-101.

Tickner, J.A., ‘Re-visioning security’ in K. Booth & S. Smith (eds), International Relations Theory Today (Polity Press, 1995), pp. 175-97. In Minerva folder

Rothchild, E., ‘What is security?’ Daedalus, 124:3 (1995), 53-99.

On broadening and deepening:

Buzan, Barry, People, States and Fear: An Agenda for International Security, 2nd ed. Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1991 [2007].

Mathews, J. T., ‘Redefining Security’, Foreign Affairs, 68:2 (1989), 162-77. ‘e’ only

UNDP, Human Development Report 1994 (UNDP, 1995). Chapter 2: New Dimensions of Human Security. Available at: http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/1994/en/.

Bilgin, P., ‘Reflection, Evaluation, Integration: Individual and Societal Dimensions of Security’, International Studies Review, 5:2 (2003), 203-22.

On the Welsh School:

Booth, K., Theory of World Security (Cambridge UP, 2007).

Neufeld, M., ‘Pitfalls of Emancipation and Discourses of Security’, International Relations, 18:1 (2004), 109-23.

McDonald, M., ‘Emancipation and Critical Terrorism Studies’, European Political Science, 6:3 (2007), 252-9.

On the Copenhagen School:

Abrahamsen, R., ‘Blair’s Africa: The Politics of Securitization and Fear’, Alternatives, 30:1 (2005), 55-80.

Balzacq, T., ‘The Three Faces of Securitization’, European Journal of International Relations, 11:2 (2005), 171-201.

Hansen, L. ‘The Little Mermaid’s Silent Security Dilemma’, Millennium 29:2 (2000), 285-306.

McDonald, Matt, ‘Securitisation and the Construction of Security’, European Journal of International Relations, 14:4 (2008).

Williams, M.C., ‘Words, Images, Enemies: Securitization in International Politics’, International Studies Quarterly, 47:4 (2003), 511-31.

On human security:

Owen, T. (ed.), Special Section on Human Security, Security Dialogue, 35:3 (2004), 345-87.

Paris, R., ‘Human Security: Paradigm Shift or Hot Air?’, International Security, 26:2 (2001), 87-102. ‘e’ only

Suhrke, A., ‘Human Security and the Interests of States" Security Dialogue, Vol. 30 (No. 3): 1999, pp. 265-76.

 

Week 3: What can we know about security? Epistemology

The background lecture reading for this week is: 

‘Chapter 2 - What can we know about security?’ in Jarvis and Holland, Security: A Critical Introduction, Palgrave.

Compulsory group seminar readings: 

Group 1: Is knowledge of security objective, subjective, intersubjective, or something else?

Buzan, B. ‘Security – concept’, a video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqdzRjSlz34

Bevir, Mark, Daddow, Oliver and Hall, Ian (2013) ‘Chapter 1 - Interpreting global security’, in Bevir, Mark, Daddow, Oliver and Hall, Ian (eds) Interpreting Global Security. Routledge.

Booth, Ken, ‘Security and Self: Reflections of a Fallen Realist’, in Krause & Williams (eds.), Critical Security Studies (UCL Press, 1997), pp. 83-119.

Q-step students may wish to read this instead: Baele, Stephane J., Thierry Balzacq, and Philippe Bourbeau. "Numbers in global security governance." European Journal of International Security 3.1 (2018): 22-44.

Group 2: Is it possible, necessary, and good to develop universal theories of security? What might be the downsides to doing so?

Barkawi, Tarak, and Mark Laffey. "The postcolonial moment in security studies." Review of International Studies 32.2 (2006): 329-352.

Wibben, Annick TR. "Feminist politics in feminist security studies." Politics & Gender 7.4 (2011): 590-595.

Burke, Anthony. "Security cosmopolitanism." Critical Studies on Security 1.1 (2013): 13-28.

Q-step students may wish to read this instead: Baele, Stephane J., Thierry Balzacq, and Philippe Bourbeau. "Numbers in global security governance." European Journal of International Security 3.1 (2018): 22-44.

Group 3: What does the turn to everyday security add to Security Studies? What are possible critiques? (read two of these)

Crawford, Adam, and Steven Hutchinson. "Mapping the contours of ‘everyday security’: Time, space and emotion." British Journal of Criminology 56.6 (2015): 1184-1202.

Rowley, Christina, and Jutta Weldes. "The evolution of international security studies and the everyday: Suggestions from the Buffyverse." Security Dialogue 43.6 (2012): 513-530.

Parker, Owen. "Roma and the politics of EU citizenship in France: Everyday security and resistance." JCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies 50.3 (2012): 475-491.

 

Week 4: Security for whom? Referent Objects

The background lecture reading for this week is: 

‘Chapter 4 Security for whom or for what?’, in Jarvis and Holland, Security: A Critical Introduction, Palgrave.

Compulsory group seminar readings: 

Group 1: Is structural violence a security issue? Is poverty a security issue?

Galtung, Johan, 1969. 'Violence, Peace and Peace Research', Journal of Peace Research, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 167-191.

Thomas, C., ‘Global governance, development and human security’, Third World Quarterly, 22:2 (2001), pp.159-75.

Group 2: Whose security? Who or what is the referent object of security when it comes to migration?

Huysmans, J., ‘The European Union and the securitization of migration’, Journal of Common Market Studies, 38:5 (2000), 751–77.

Gelber, K. and McDonald, M., ‘Ethics and Exclusion: Representations of Sovereignty in Australia’s Approach to Asylum-Seekers’, Review of International Studies, 32:2 (2006), pp.269-89.

Burke, A., Fear of Security (Cambridge UP, 2008). Chapter 6. In Minerva folder

Group 3: What should security’s referent object be? What was security’s referent object in debates about US intervention in Afghanistan?

Heck, A. and G. Schlag, ‘Securitizing images: The female body and the war in Afghanistan’, European journal of international relations 19.4 (2013), 891-913.

 

Week 5: Security from whom/what? The changing nature of war

The background lecture reading for this week is: 

‘Chapter 5 – Security from whom or from what? The changing nature of war’, in Jarvis and Holland, Security: A Critical Introduction, Palgrave.

Compulsory group seminar readings: 

Group 1: What are the causes of war?

Fearon, J., ‘Rationalist Explanations for War’, International Organization, 49:3 (1995), 379-414.

Williams, P., ‘War’, in Williams (ed.), Security Studies: an introduction (Routledge)

Q-Step students may like to look at the Correlates of War Project (https://correlatesofwar.org) and associated literature (please search for yourself).

Group 2: What are the characteristics of ‘new wars’?

Kaldor, M., New and Old Wars (Polity, 1999), Esp. chapters 1-2.

Newman, E., ‘The “New Wars” Debate: A Historical Perspective is Needed’, Security Dialogue, 35:2 (2004), 173-89.

Group 3: How relevant are the security dilemma and deterrence today?

Jervis, R., ‘The Security Dilemma’, World Politics, 30:2 (1978), 167-214.

Waltz, K., ‘The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: More may be better’, Adelphi Paper 171 (1991).

 

Week 6: Is Reading Week – no lecture this week

Please come to seminars prepared to discuss your assessment, having thought about:

  • the question,
  • your (one-sentence) argument (which answers the question),
  • the essay structure (two or three sections? Maximum four?),
  • the theory and empirics you will use (nb – could be purely theoretical),
  • the literature you will draw on / locate your work in.

 

Week 7: Is security gendered? Feminist Secuity Studies

The background lecture reading for this week is: 

‘Chapter 6 – Security from whom or from what? New security challenges’, in Jarvis and Holland, Security: A Critical Introduction, Palgrave.

Compulsory group seminar readings: 

Group 1: What changes about security studies when it is ‘feminist security studies’? Subject? Method? Epistemologies?

Wibben, A. 2017 ‘Debates in Feminist Security Studies’ in Dunn Cavelty M. and Balzacq, T. Routledge Handbook of Security Studies, London: Routledge, pp.85-95.

Shepherd, L.J., 2007. ‘Victims, perpetrators and actors’ revisited: Exploring the potential for a feminist reconceptualisation of (international) security and (gender) violence. The British Journal of Politics and International Relations9(2), pp.239-256.

Sjoberg, L., 2011. Looking Forward, Conceptualizing Feminist Security Studies. Politics & Gender7(4), pp.600-604.

Group 2: My missile is bigger than yours. How is an analysis of masculinity helpful in international security?

Cohn, C., 1987. Sex and death in the rational world of defense intellectuals. Signs: Journal of women in culture and society12(4), pp.687-718.

Cohn, C., 2018. The perils of mixing masculinity and missiles. New York Times5. Available at https://www.peacewomen.org/sites/default/files/The%20Perils%20of%20Mixing%20Masculinity%20and%20Missiles.pdf 

Group 3: Are women human?

Marhia, N., 2013. Some humans are more human than others: Troubling the ‘human’ in human security from a critical feminist perspective. Security Dialogue44(1), pp.19-35.

Hansen, L., 2000. The Little Mermaid's silent security dilemma and the absence of gender in the Copenhagen School. Millennium29(2), pp.285-306.

 

Week 8: Is security human? Climate

The background lecture reading for this week is: 

Dalby, Simon. "Climate change: New dimensions of environmental security." The RUSI Journal 158.3 (2013): 34-43.

Compulsory group seminar readings: 

Group 1: Are the 2019 Australian bush fires a vision of the world’s future? Why isn’t climate change securitised in Australia?

McDonald, Matt. "The failed securitization of climate change in Australia." Australian Journal of Political Science 47.4 (2012): 579-592.

McDonald, Matt. "Discourses of climate security." Political Geography 33 (2013): 42-51.

There has been a lot of press coverage on this case study. Please search through recent high-quality reporting e.g. New York Times, The Australian, The Guardian etc.

Group 2: Is climate change a security issue because it increases conflict?

Kaplan, Robert D. "The coming anarchy." https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1994/02/the-coming-anarchy/304670/

Dalby, Simon. "Rethinking geopolitics: Climate security in the Anthropocene." Global Policy 5.1 (2014): 1-9.

Group 3: Is security (post-)human?

Take your pick from chapters in: Eroukhmanoff, Clara, and Matt Harker. Reflections on the Posthuman in International Relations: The Anthropocene, Security and Ecology. E-International Relations, 2017. https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/download/dcefcc02412b69a62226c898658d0517ec9ff114759f5d6651aa55fce7fb2e1d/1252248/Reflections-on-the-Posthuman-in-IR-E-IR.pdf

Holland, J. ‘Being human in a world of zombies’, in Holland, J. Fictional Television and American Politics: From 9/11 to Donald Trump, Manchester UP, 2019. In Minerva folder

 

Week 9: Is security possible? Terrorism

The background lecture reading for this week is: 

‘Chapter 7 – is security possible?’, in Jarvis and Holland, Security: A Critical Introduction, Palgrave.

Compulsory group seminar readings: 

Group 1: Is terrorism a security threat? Why? Should it be?

Jackson, R., Writing the War on Terrorism (Manchester UP, 2005) – pick your chapter.

Holland, Jack. ‘From September 11th, 2001 to 9-11: From Void to Crisis’, International Political Sociology, 3.3 (2009), 275-292.

Zehfuss, M, ‘Forget September 11’, Third World Quarterly, 24:3 (2003) pp.513-28.

Group 2: Is ontological security possible?

Mitzen, Jennifer. "Ontological security in world politics: State identity and the security dilemma." European journal of international relations 12.3 (2006): 341-370.

Rossdale, Chris. "Enclosing critique: the limits of ontological security." International political sociology 9.4 (2015): 369-386.

Group 3: Is security possible in the War on Terror? Does security always come at the expense of an Other? Are security and insecurity inextricably coupled?

Bigo, D. ‘International Political Sociology’, in Williams (ed.), Security Studies: an introduction Routledge.

 Bigo, Didier, and Anastassia Tsoukala. "Chapter 1 - Understanding (in) security." Terror, Insecurity and Liberty. Routledge, 2008.

 

Week 10: Is security good? Health

The background lecture reading for this week is: 

‘Chapter 8 – is security desirable?’, in Jarvis and Holland, Security: A Critical Introduction, Palgrave.

Compulsory group seminar readings: 

Group 1: A ‘war’ on Covid? What is security’s referent object in the response to Covid-19?

Sears, N. ‘The Securitization of COVID-19: Three Political Dilemmas’, Global Policy, 25 March 2020: https://www.globalpolicyjournal.com/blog/25/03/2020/securitization-covid-19-three-political-dilemmas

Jarvis, Lee. "Covid-19 and the politics of temporality: constructing credibility in coronavirus discourse." Critical Studies on Security (2021): 1-4.

Group 2: Is securitisation good or bad? Should global health issues be securitised? How? 

Davies, S. (2008). “Securitizing infectious disease.” International Affairs 84: 295-313.

Floyd, Rita. "Can securitization theory be used in normative analysis? Towards a just securitization theory." Security Dialogue 42.4-5 (2011): 427-439.

Group 3: Is securitisation good or bad? Should HIV and/or aids have been securitised?

Elbe, Stefan. "Should HIV/AIDS be securitized? The ethical dilemmas of linking HIV/AIDS and security." International Studies Quarterly 50.1 (2006): 119-144.

Nyman, Jonna. "What is the value of security? Contextualising the negative/positive debate." Review of International Studies 42.5 (2016): 821-839.

 

Week 11: What is the future of Security Studies - UPDATED

Please note that I have updated the reading for Week 11 over the Easter break. I have updated the reading because this is such an important topic and I would like to gain feedback from you, as students, on what you think should be in a Security Studies module.

The background lecture reading for this week is: 

‘Conclusion’, in Jarvis and Holland, Security: A Critical Introduction, Palgrave.

Compulsory seminar reading FOR ALL GROUPS:

Fiona B Adamson, Pushing the Boundaries: Can We “Decolonize” Security Studies?, Journal of Global Security Studies, Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2020, Pages 129–135: https://academic.oup.com/jogss/article/5/1/129/5682795?login=true

 

If you are interested, the old readings (which you no longer have to do) were:

Compulsory group seminar readings: 

Group 1: What should security’s referent object be? What is (or are) security’s referent object(s) in contemporary American political debate?

Fermor, B. and J. Holland, ‘Security and Polarization in Trump’s America: Securization and the domestic politics of threatening others’, Global Affairs, 6:1 (2020), 55-70.

Group 2: How do gender/race/sexuality work together in terrorism discourse?

Bhattacharyya, G., 2013. Dangerous brown men: exploiting sex, violence and feminism in the'war on terror'. Zed Books Ltd.. Chapter 1: Introduction

Puar, J., 2013. Rethinking homonationalism. International Journal of Middle East Studies, 45(2), pp.336-339.

Group 3: What should security’s referent object be? What is security’s referent object in debates on nuclear politics?

Vuori, J. ‘A timely prophet? The doomsday clock as a visualization of securitization moves with a global referent object’, Security Dialogue, 41:3 (2010), 255-277. 

This list was last updated on 15/04/2021