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HIST3726
Module Reading List

In the Shadow of Franco: Terror and its Legacy in Spain, 1936-Present Day, 2021/22, Semester 1
Dr Peter Anderson
p.p.anderson@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

1 The Issues Confronting Spain and its Recent Past

Task

Read the following news stories and consider what might be meant by Spain’s memory wars.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7071405.stm

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-46048514

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/24/world/europe/franco-exhumed.html

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/21/remains-francisco-franco-exhumed-thursday-spain

Group One

Why is the Francoist past so controversial?

Anderson, P., ‘Knowing and Acknowledging Spain’s Dark Civil War Past’, Journal of Contemporary History, 52, 1, (2017), pp. 129-139. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Anderson, P. and del Arco Blanco, M.A.,  ‘Introduction’, in Anderson, P.,  del Arco Blanco, (M.A.),  (eds.), Mass Killings and Violence in Spain, 1936-1952: grappling with the Past (London: Routledge, 2014). (Available on-line through the library catalogue).

Group Two

What were the effects of silence on the victims of the Francoist repression and how is that silence being challenged?

Cenarro, A., ‘Memory beyond the Public Sphere: the Francoist Repression Remembered in Aragon’, History and Memory, 14, 1-2 (2002), pp. 165-188.

Davis, M., ‘Is Spain Recovering its Memory? Breaking the “Pacto del Olivido”, Human Rights Quarterly 27, 3 (2005), pp. 858-800. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Three

What is at stake in Spain’s memory wars?

Casanova, J., ‘Disremembering Francoism: What is at Stake in Spain’s Memory Wars’, in Graham, H., Interrogating Francoism. History and Dictatorship in Twentieth-Century Spain (London: Bloomsbury, 2016), pp. 203-222. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Either

Graham, H., ‘The Afterlife of Violence. Spain’s Memory Wars in National and International Context’, in Graham, H., War and its Shadow: Spain’s Civil War in Europe’s Long Twentieth Century (Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2012), pp. 125-151. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Or

Graham, H. ‘The Spanish Civil War, 1936-2003: the return of Republican Memory’, Science & Society, 68, 3 (2004), pp. 313-328. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group 4

How can we use the concept of silence to understand societies with difficult pasts?

Winter, J. “Thinking about Silence.” In Ben-Ze’ev, E, Ginio, R., and  Winter, J., (eds.), Shadows of War. A Social History of Silence in the Twentieth Century, pp 3–31. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp. 3-31. (Available online through the library catalogue).

2 The lead up to the Civil War

Task

Granada TV programme on the prelude to the Civil War

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81RhewkQbOk

BBC RADIO FOUR IN OUR TIME PROGRAMME ON THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR WITH PAUL PRESTON, HELEN GRAHAM AND MARY VINCENT

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00548wn

Key Reading

Group One

How did the political and social situation in Spain develop towards war and violence?

Anderson, P., The Francoist Military Trials. Terror and Complicity, 1939-1945 (London: Routledge 2010), pp. 13-34. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Casanova, J., The Spanish Republic and Civil War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp. 125-149. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Two

What was the role of tensions in the countryside and military culture in the outbreak and violence of the civil war?

Balfour, S. and La Porte, P., ‘Spanish Military Cultures and the Moroccan Wars, 1909-36’, European History Quarterly, 30, 3 (2000), pp. 307-332. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Preston, P., ‘The Agrarian War in the South’, in Preston, P., (ed.), Revolution and War in Spain 1931-1939 (London: Methuen, 1984), pp. 159-181. (Available online though the library catalogue).

Group Three

In what ways did some on the right try to justify violence?

Preston, P., ‘The Theorists of Extermination. The Origins of Violence in the Spanish Civil War’, in Jerez-Ferrán, C. and Amago, S., (eds.), Unearthing Franco’s Legacy: mass graves and the recovery of historical memory in Spain (Indiana: University of Notre Dame press, 2015) , pp. 42-67. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Rohr, I., ‘Productive Hatreds: radical segregationist discourses and the making of Francoism’, , in Graham, H., (ed.), Interrogating Francoism: history and dictatorship in Twentieth-Century Spain (London: Bloomsbury, 2016), pp. 99-113. (Available online through the library catalogue).

3 Anti-Clerical Violence

Task (1)

Read the following newspaper stories and decide why the anti-clerical violence in the Civil War is so significant

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/clergy-killed-in-spanish-civil-war-to-be-beatified-1.976600

https://www.ft.com/content/4c174a10-3285-11e3-b3a7-00144feab7de

https://www.acton.org/publications/transatlantic/2017/11/06/remembering-martyrs-socialism-spanish-civil-war

Task (2)

You can search the Daily Mail here https://go.gale.com/ps/start.do?p=DMHA&u=leedsuni

Find these stories (and read them!)

Daily Mail, ‘Red Women Butcher Spanish Priests’, 6/08/1936 p. 10.

Daily Mail, ‘Spanish Reds Burn Nun Alive’, 18/11/1936, p. 7.

Key READING

Group One

How important is symbolism in explaining the violence?

Lincoln, B., Revolutionary Exhumations in Spain, July 1936’, Comparative Studies in Society and History, 27, 2, (1985), pp. 241-260 (available online through the library catalogue)

Group Two

How important is symbolism in explaining the violence?

Vincent, M., ‘‘The Keys to the Kingdom: religious violence in the Spanish Civil War, July-August 1936’, in Ealham, C. and Richards, M. (eds.), The Splintering of Spain: cultural history and the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 68-92. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Three

How helpful is the category of masculinity in explaining the violence?

Thomas, M., ‘'We have come to place you at liberty and to burn the convent': Masculinity, Sexuality and Anticlerical Violence during the Spanish Civil War’, available at:

http://www.albavolunteer.org/wpcontent/uploads/2011/12/Maria_Thomas_Watt_Award_2011_grad.pdf  

Group Four

How far can we explain the violence through the concept of politics?

Thomas, M., ‘The Civilisation that is Being Forged Amid the Thunder of the Cannons. Anticlerical Violence and Social Reconfiguration: July-December 1936’, in Anderson, P., and del Arco Blanco, M.A., Mass Killings and Violence in Spain, 1936-1952 (London: Routledge, 2015), pp. 112-133. (Available online through the library catalogue).

FURTHER READING

de la Cueva, J., Religious Persecution, Anticlerical Tradition and Revolution: On Atrocities against the Clergy during the Spanish Civil War’, Journal of Contemporary History, 33, 3, (1998), pp. 355-369 (available online through the library).

Thomas, M., ‘Sacred Destruction? Anticlericalism, Iconoclasm and the Sacralization of Politics in Twentieth-Century Spain’, European History Quarterly, 47, 3, (2017), pp. 490-508. (Available online through the library catalogue).

  1. Francoist Violence behind the Lines

Task

Read the following newspaper reports from the time and decide what they tell us about the nature of the Francoist violence in the Civil War

https://thegrandarchive.wordpress.com/slaughter-of-4000-at-badajoz-city-of-horrors-is-told-by-tribune-man/

http://www.escolar.net/wp-content/chicagotribune_Jay_Allen_Interviewing_Franco_28.07.1936_p.1.pdf

You can search The Manchester Guardian  here https://search.proquest.com/publication/44261?OpenUrlRefId=info:xri/sid:primo

Look for this story: The Manchester Guardian, ‘Terrorism in Andalusia: wholesale shooting of Peasants at Harvest Time. The Moors Let Loose’, 17/09/1936, p. 12.

Key Reading

Group One: the nature of the violence

Who was killed by who?

Anderson, P., The Francoist Military Trials. Terror and Complicity, 1939-1945 (London: Routledge 2010), pp. 37-43. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Cobo Romero, F., and Ortega López, T., ‘Francoist Antifeminism and the Violent Reversal of Women’s Liberation, 1936-1951’, in Anderson, P., and del Arco Blanco, M.A., (eds.), Mass Killings and Violence in Spain, 1936-1952 (London: Routledge, 2015), pp. 72-88. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Serém, R., ‘A Coup against Change: repression in Seville and the Assault on Civilian Society’, , in Graham, H., (ed.), Interrogating Francoism: history and dictatorship in Twentieth-Century Spain (London: Bloomsbury, 2016), pp. 115-137. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Two: explaining the violence

To what extent do Francoist ideas explain the violence?

Preston, P., ‘The Answer lies in the Sewers: Captain Aguilera and the Mentality of the Francoist Officer Corps’, Science & Society, 68, 3 (2004), pp. 277-312. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Richards, M., ‘Civil War, Violence and the Construction of Francoism’, in Preston, P. and Mackenzie, A., The Republic Besieged: civil war in Spain 1936-1939 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, ), pp. 197-239. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Rohr, I., ‘Productive Hatreds: radical segregationist discourses and the making of Francoism’, , in Graham, H., (ed.), Interrogating Francoism: history and dictatorship in Twentieth-Century Spain (London: Bloomsbury, 2016), pp. 99-113. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Three: explaining the violence

To what extent was there a logic behind the Francoist violence

Rodrigo, Javier, ‘Our Fatherland was Full of Weeds”. Violence during the Spanish Civil War and the Franco Dictatorship’, pp. 135-153. Available here https://d1wqtxts1xzle7.cloudfront.net/38693000/Rodrigo_04_08_08_2.pdf?1441640207=&response-content-disposition=inline%3B+filename%3DOur_Fatherland_was_Full_of_Weeds._Violen.pdf&Expires=1592496642&Signature=ZqeRrcMnKkAP6mJHSgGK9dTdBYc6fIybplA2KgYw50pCZP7NXzKPlqc8Ro~t3Dt3YDg6O0zU0smC7vSFzTVbh~-8TmTOc36qla4iwlYwt-9oX1cqlGiDGFojyIslV4qB3O8NhG70G7Bik9KnEDfW4HA4-4Z8MA4bUmiZS7fgQfRR25ANraGaR8sllb90nCcD71e3MpX~SnuFp8iohe1E-fba67YaUpuS8V6dv~-jdLa7DV2N4WZqlzbQxps~JhkyMQeT8fazjpLCxgmyzjLV-sr-gJGI6tshpAVDBjS5aJaJnuvZhU-z0UCMs1aevcnOax1~myYOeAjy1bLUO7xIow__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAJLOHF5GGSLRBV4ZA  

If the link does not work, please contact Peter Anderson (p.p.anderson@leeds.ac.uk).

Group Four: explaining the violence

How helpful is the concept of genocidal practices in explaining the violence?

Miguez Macho, A., The Genocidal Genealogy of Francoism: violence, memory and impunity (Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2016), pp. 34-64. (Available online through the library catalogue).

5 Post-war Francoist Violence

Task

Read the following newspaper reports and decide what they tell us about the post-war Franco regime

The Manchester Guardian, ‘Spain’s Prisoners’, 27/04/1940, p. 6. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Key Reading

Group One: the nature of the violence

What kind of violence did the Franco regime carry out?

Casanova, J., ‘The Faces of Terror. Violence during the Franco Dictatorship’, in Jerez-Ferrán, C. and Amago, S., (eds.), Unearthing Franco’s Legacy: mass graves and the recovery of historical memory in Spain (Indiana: University of Notre Dame press, 2015) , pp. 90- 120. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Two: prisons and forced labour

What was the purpose and effect of the Francoist prison system?

Gómez Bravo, G., ‘Loving the Punished: the prison system and the Church in the post-war period’, in Anderson, P., and del Arco Blanco, M.A., (eds.), Mass Killings and Violence in Spain, 1936-1952 (London: Routledge, 2015), pp. 137-155. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Graham, H., ‘Franco’s Prisons. Building the Brutal National Community in Spain’, in Graham, H., War and its Shadow: Spain’s Civil War in Europe’s Long Twentieth Century (Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2012), pp. 103-125. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Menidola Gonzalo, F., ‘Forced Labor, Public Policies, and Business Strategies During Franco’s Dictatorship: an interim report’, Enterprise & Society, 14, 1 (2013), pp. 182-213. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Three: explaining the violence

To what extent was the Francoist post-war violence driven from below?

Anderson, P. ‘Singling out Victims: Denunciation and Collusion in the Post-Civil War Francoist Repression in Spain, 1939-1945’, European History Quarterly, 39, 1 (2009), pp. 7-26. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Anderson, P., Friend or Foe? Occupation, Collaboration and Selective Violence in the Spanish Civil War (Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2016), pp. 1-22.

6 Hunger or Famine: everyday life in post-war Spain

Task

Group One: Read, Ó Gráda, C., Famine: a short history (Princeton: Princenton University Press, 2009), pp. 1-13 and pp. 229-259 to decide to what extent famines are caused by nature or by human actions. (Available online through the library catalogue.

Group Two Read the reports from the Rockefeller Foundation supplied by Peter Anderson and decide on whether working-class people in post-civil war Madrid suffered from a famine?

 Group Three Read

The Daily Telegraph, ‘Starvation in Southern Spain’, 26/09/1946, p. 5. You can search the newspaper here: https://go.gale.com/ps/start.do?p=TGRH&u=leedsuni

The Manchester Guardian, ‘Spain’s Difficulties: food and international relations’, 4/04/1941, p. 4. (Available online through the library catalogue).

The Manchester Guardian, ‘Hunger in Spain. Short Rations and Untilled Fields’, 2/04/1941, p. 4.

And decide on how bad the food problems were that Spaniards faced in the 1940s

Key Reading

Group One

Did Spaniards face hunger or a famine in the 1940s?

Anderson, P., ‘Iniquitous Famine: marginalised mothers and children’, (Peter Anderson will supply the text).

Del Arco Blanco, M.A., ‘ Famine and Malnutrition in Spain: political and social-economic conditions’, (Peter Anderson will supply the text).

Group Two

What difficulties did people face in everyday life?

Anderson, P., The Francoist Military Trials. Terror and Complicity, 1939-1945 (London: Routledge 2010), pp. 123-146. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Del Arco Blanco, M.A., ‘Hunger and the Consolidation of the Francoist Regime (1939-1951), European History Quarterly, 40, 3 (2010), pp. 458-483.

Group Three: Property

How did personal property become part of the Francoist repression?

Del Arco Blanco, M.A. and Anderson, P., ‘Property , the Forging of Francoism and Collective Memory’, International Journal of Iberian Studies, 30, 2 (2017), pp. 73-92.

Martínez López, F., and Gómez Oliver, M., ‘Political Responsibilities in Franco’s Spain: recovering the memory of economic repression and social control in Andalusia, 1936-45’, in Morcillo, A. G., Memory and Cultural History of the Spanish Civil War. Realms of Oblivion (Boston: Brill, 2014), pp. 111-144.

Group Four

How successful were Francoist relief activities and how much were they guided by humanitarian considerations?

Óscar Barreria Rodríguez, ‘Franco’s Bread: Auxilio Social from Below, 1937-1943’, in Morcillo, A. G., Memory and Cultural History of the Spanish Civil War. Realms of Oblivion (Boston: Brill, 2014), pp. 319-357. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Brydan, D., ‘Starving Spain: International Humanitarian Responses to Spain’s Hunger Crisis’, (Peter Anderson will supply the text).

7 Women and Franco’s Prisons: challenging the silence

Task

Read chapter three of Cuevas, T., Prison of Women: testimonies of War and Resistance in Spain, 1939-1975. Available here https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=DwoGu0sXKYAC&pg=PR4&lpg=PR4&dq=Tomasa+Cuevas+in+English&source=bl&ots=trb3Keqsog&sig=ACfU3U1z1YTVW8Y5afyFaKLMc-gGK8ftNA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwih1amh6ovqAhUlolwKHbL1DDAQ6AEwAnoECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q=Tomasa%20Cuevas%20in%20English&f=false

And decide on the value of this piece of testimony.

Key Reading - Everyone

Do we have a duty to those who bear witness?

Simon, R., and Eppert, C., ‘Remembering Obligation: Pedagogy and the Witnessing of Testimony in Historical Trauma’, Canadian Journal of Education, 22, 2, (1997), pp. 175-191. (Available online through the library catalogue – JSTOR).

What can we gain from female prisoner testimony?

O'Leary, C., ‘Bearing Witness: Carlota O'Neill's Una mujer en la Guerra de España’, Bulletin of Spanish Studies: Hispanic Studies and Researches on Spain, Portugal and Latin America, 89, 7-8 (2012), pp. 155-168.

What can we learn from the story of Amparo Barayón?

Graham, H. ‘Ghosts of Change. The Story of Amparo Barayón’, in Graham, H., War and its Shadow: Spain’s Civil War in Europe’s Long Twentieth Century (Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2012), pp. 51-73. (Available online through the library catalogue).

What is the importance of the Presas de Franco (Women Prisoners of Franco) exhibition?

Ramblado-Minero, M. C., Sites of Memory/Sites of Oblivion in Contemporary Spain, Revista Canadiense de Estudios Hispánicos, 36, 1 (2011), pp. 29-42. (Available online through the library catalogue). Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Further Reading

Mangini, S., ‘Memories of Resistance: women activists from the Spanish Civil War’, Signs, 17, 1 (1991), pp. 171-186. (Available online through the library catalogue).

8 The Myths of Francoism

Task

Read the newspaper article and consider why the Franco regime celebrated ‘25 Years of Peace’ in 1964

The Guardian, ‘Spain out of Isolation’, 26/06/1964, p. 12. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Key Reading

Everyone

Aguilar, P., Memory and Amnesia: the role of the Spanish Civil War in the Transition to Democracy (Oxford: Berghan Books, 2002), Chapter 2. Available at https://books.google.co.uk/books?hl=en&lr=&id=jZN8BpI6MYcC&oi=fnd&pg=PR9&dq=Memory+and+Amnesia+of+the+Spanish+Civil+War&ots=0jqQs3ugpO&sig=i6kYjigLi5BmtuL2pWBh7QpQB7w#v=onepage&q=Memory%20and%20Amnesia%20of%20the%20Spanish%20Civil%20War&f=false

Please go directly to chapter 2 (before Google Books limits your viewing and read as much of the chapter as possible).

Group One: the early Franco regime

Campos Pérez, L., ‘Representing the Enemy: the iconography of the “Other” in history schoolbooks during the first years of Franco’s regime’, Contributions to the History of Concepts, 5, 2 (2009), pp. 140-161. (Available online thorugh the library catalogue). Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Cobo Romero, F., et al, ‘The Stability and Consolidation of the Francoist Regime. The Case of Eastern Andalusia, 1936-1950’, Contemporary European History, 20, 1 (2011), pp. 37-59. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Two: the middle and late Franco Regime

Richards, M., ‘Remembering Spain’s War: Violence, Social Change and Collective Identity since 1936’, in Anderson, P., and del Arco Blanco, M.A., (eds.), Mass Killings and Violence in Spain, 1936-1952 (London: Routledge, 2015), pp. 195-209. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Richards, M., “Stories for After a War: Social Memory and the Making of the Urban and Industrial Transition in 1960s Spain’, in Graham, H., (ed.), Interrogating Francoism: history and dictatorship in Twentieth-Century Spain (London: Bloomsbury, 2016), pp. 181-201). (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Three: explaining support for the regime

Cazorla Sánchez, A., ‘Beyond “The Shall not Pass”. How the Experience of Violence Reshaped Political Values in Franco’s Spain’, Journal of Contemporary History, 40, 3 (2005), pp. 503-520. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Hernández Burgos, C., ‘The Triumph of ‘Normality’. Social Attitudes, Popular Opinion and the Construction of the Franco Regime in Post-War Rural Spain (1936-1952), European History Quarterly, 46, 2, (2016), pp. 291-310. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Four: private resistance

How did some groups mourn for their dead despite the restrictions imposed by the Franco regime?

Aguilar, P., ‘From Mourning Severed to Mourning Recovered: tribute and remembrance strategies for families of the victims of Francoist repression’, Memory Studies, 13, 3 (2020), pp. 277-294.

Group Five: denial and genocidal practices

To what extent was Francoist denial a genocidal practice?

Miguez Macho, A., The Genocidal Genealogy of Francoism: violence, memory and impunity (Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2016), pp. 65-88. (Available online through the library catalogue).

10 The Transition to Democracy

Task

Read the newspaper article and assess the dangers faced during the transition to democracy

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/nov/07/prince-juan-carlos-franco-spain-democracy-1975

https://www.theguardian.com/world/from-the-archive-blog/2018/jun/01/spain-constitution-new-era-1978

Key Reading

Everyone

What was the Pact of Silence? How was it sustained? How long did it Last?

Boyd, C. P., ‘the Politics of History and Memory in Democratic Spain’, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 617, 1 (2008), pp. 133-148.

Group One: Was the Pact of Silence a force for good or ill?

Key Reading

Alija Fernández, R. A. & Martín-Ortega, O., ‘Silence and the Right to Justice: confronting Impunity in Spain’, The International Journal of Human Rights, 21, 5 (2017), pp. 531-549. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Encarnación, O., ‘Reconciliation after Democratization: coping with the past in Spain’, Political Science Quarterly, 123, 3 (2008), pp. 435-459.

Further Reading

Escudero, R., ‘Road to Impunity: the absence of transnational justice programs in Spain’, Human Rights Quarterly, 36, 1 (2014), pp. 123-146. (available online through the library catalogue).

Maxwell, K., ‘Spain’s Transition to Democracy: A Model for Eastern Europe?’, Proceedings of the Academy of Political Science, 38, 1 (1991), pp. 35-49. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Two: Why did so many people support political amnesty?

Aguilar, P., ‘Collective Memory of the Spanish Civil War: the case of political amnesty in the Spanish Transition to democracy’, Democratization, 4, 4 (1997), pp. 88-109. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Encarnación, O. G., ‘Justice in Times of Transition: lessons from the Iberian experience’, International Studies Quarterly, 56, 1 (2012), pp. 179-192. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Three: To what extent was the ‘Law of Historical Memory’ founded on denial?

Miguez Macho, A., The Genocidal Genealogy of Francoism: violence, memory and impunity (Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2016), pp. 89-112. (Available online through the library catalogue).

10 The Left and the Transition

Task

Start by reading this newspaper article to gain an insight into the exhumations

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/aug/21/spain?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487

Group One

To what extent did fear and guilt shape the transition?

Aguilar, P., ‘Unwilling to Forget: local memory initiatives in post-Franco Spain’, South European Society and Politics, 22, 4 (2017), pp. 405-426. (Available online though the library catalogue).

Davis, A., ‘Enforcing the Transition: the demoblization of collective memory in Spain, 1979-1982, Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, 92, 6 (2015), pp. 667-689. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Smith, G., ‘Formal Culture, Practical Sense and the Structures of Fear in Spain’, Anthropologica, 51, 2 (2009), pp. 279-288. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Two

How did the way the left forged memory change over time after Franco’s death?

Marco, J., and Anderson, P., ‘Legitimacy by Proxy: searching for a usable past through the International Brigades in Spain’s post-Franco democracy, 1975-2015’, Journal of Modern European History, 14, 3 (2016), pp. 391-410. (Available online through the library catalogue – JSTOR).

Narotzky, S., and Smith, G., “Being Político” in Spain: an Ethnographic Account of Memories, Silences and Public Politics’, History and Memory, 14, 1-2 (2002), pp. 189-228.

11 Exhuming the Past

Task

Watch the video and assess the importance of the exhumations.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lt5TjriDj8c

Watch the video. Was it a good idea to exhume Franco?

https://english.elpais.com/elpais/2019/10/24/inenglish/1571900395_914719.html

Group One: Exhumation

What is the value of exhuming bodies from mass graves?

Ferrándiz, F., ‘Cries and Whispers: exhuming and narrating defeat in Spain today’, Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, 9, 2, (2008), pp. 177-192. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Renshaw, L., ‘The Scientific and Affective Identification of Republican Civilian Victims from the Spanish Civil War’, Journal of Material Culture, 15, 4 (2010), pp. 449-463. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Two: Commemoration

What is the value of commemoration?

Brown, Iris, ‘Commemoration as Symbolic Reparation: new narratives or spaces of conflict?’ Human Rights Review, 14, (2013), pp. 273-289. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Why has the Valley of the Fallen proved such a contested site?

Hepworth, A., ‘Site of Memory and dismemory: the Valley of the Fallen in Spain’, Journal of Genocide Research, 16, 4 (2014), pp. 463-485. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Group Three: the role of journalism and documentaries

To what extent journalism help Spanish society come to terms with the past?

Armengou Martín, M., ‘Investigative Journalism as a Tool for Recovering Historical Memory’, in Jerez-Ferrán, C. and Amago, S., (eds.), Unearthing Franco’s Legacy: mass graves and the recovery of historical memory in Spain (Indiana: University of Notre Dame press, 2015) , pp. 156-167. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Herrmann, G., ‘Mass Graves on Spanish TV: A Tale of Two Documentaries’, in Carlos Jerez-Farrán and Samuel Amago, eds, Unearthing Franco’s Legacy: Mass Graves and the Recovery of Historical Memory in Spain (Notre Dame, University of Notre Dame Press, 2010), pp. 168-91. (Available online through the library catalogue.

Castelló, Enric, Disrupting ‘Wills to Truth’. How Catalan TV Documentary Contributed to the Democratization of Spanish Civil War Narratives’, Memory Studies, 7, 2 (2014), pp. 223-238.

Group 4: creating a political memory through exhumation

To what extent are exhumations a left-wing or humanitarian issue?

Gassiot Balbé, ‘the Political, Social and Scientific Contexts of Archaeological Investigations of Mass Graves in Spain’, Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, 4, 3 (2008), pp. 429-444. (Available online through the library catalogue).

Samoui, S. and Raillard, S.L., ‘Resolving the Conflict or Continuing the Struggle? Unearthing and Establishing “Republican Victims” in Spain’, Revue française de science politique (English Edition), 64, 3 (204), pp. 51-76. (Available online though the library catalogue – JSTOR).

This list was last updated on 16/07/2021