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PIED5738M
PIED5738M Tech,Media&Politics Reading List

Technology, Media and Politics: Research and Real World Cases, 2021/22, Semester 2
Dr Gillian Bolsover
g.bolsover@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Lecture and Workshop Readings, Course Textbook

Each week you are assigned readings for both the lecture and workshop section. These readings are a compulsory part of course content. Each week for lectures, you will read two journal articles and one short media report. These are accessible online via the Library or Module reading list. Each week for workshops, you will read sections from the the core course textbook Programming with Python for Social Scientists by Phillip D. Brooker.

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Week 1: Introduction to Research in Technology, Media and Politics

Lecture Required Reading:

Mayer-Schönberger, V., and Cuiker, K. (2013). Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and ThinkCore

      - Chapter One: Now (pp. 1 18) 

      - And Chapter Seven: Implications (pp. 123 – 149)    

Chadwick, A. (2017). Donald Trump, the 2016 U.S. Presidential Campaign, and the Intensification of the Hybrid Media System. In The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (pp. 240–284). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Core  

The Economist. (2018, 22 December). How to think about data in 2019: Le stats, c'est moi. https://www.economist.com/leaders/2018/12/22/how-to-think-about-data-in-2019
 

Workshop Required Reading:

Brooker, P. (2020). Programming with Python for Social Scientists.  

      - Chapter One: What is programming? And what could it mean for social science research? (p 19 – 36)  

      - Chapter Three: Setting up to start coding (p 51 – 56)  

      - Chapter Four: Core Concepts/Objects (p 57 – 78)  

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Week 2: Hashtags for Change: The Role of New Media in Politics

Lecture Required Reading:

Rinke, E. M., & Röder, M. (2011). Media ecologies, communication culture, and temporal-spatial unfolding: Three components in a communication model of the Egyptian regime change. International Journal of Communication, 5, 1273–1285. http://ijoc.org/index.php/ijoc/article/view/1173
 

Wolfsfeld, G., Segev, E., & Sheafer, T. (2013). Social media and the Arab Spring: Politics comes first. International Journal of Press/Politics, 18(2), 115–137. https://doi.org/10.1177/1940161212471716
 

The Economist. (2016, January 9). The Arab winter. The Economist. Retrieved from https://www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2016/01/09/the-arab-winter
 

The Economist. (2016, January 11). The Arab spring, five years on: Daily chart. The Economist. Retrieved from https://www.economist.com/graphic-detail/2016/01/11/the-arab-spring-five-years-on  

Workshop Required Reading:

Brooker, P. (2020). Programming with Python for Social Scientists.  

      - Chapter Five: Structuring Objects (p 79 – 107)  

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Week 3: Fake News, Bots and Online Opinion Manipulation in Recent Political Events

Lecture Required Reading:

Bond, R. M., Fariss, C. J., Jones, J. J., Kramer, A. D. I., Marlow, C., Settle, J. E., & Fowler, J. H. (2012). A 61-million-person experiment in social influence and political mobilization. Nature, 489(7415), 295–298. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature11421 Core  

King, G., Pan, J., & Roberts, M. E. (2017). How the Chinese Government Fabricates Social Media Posts for Strategic Distraction, not Engaged Argument. American Political Science Review, 111(3), 484–501. 

Cadwalladr, C. (2017, 7 May). The great British Brexit robbery: how our democracy was hijacked. The Guardian/The Observer. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/07/the-great-british-brexit-robbery-hijacked-democracy
 

Workshop Required Reading:

Brooker, P. (2020). Programming with Python for Social Scientists.  

      - Chapter Six: Building Better Code with (Slightly) More Complex Concepts/Objects (p 109 – 125)  

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Week 4: 'Big Data' Research in Media and Politics – Potentials, Limitations and Ethics of Research in the Area of Technology, Media and Politics

Lecture Required Reading:

boyd, d., & Crawford, K. (2012). Critical questions for big data: Provocations for a cultural, technological, and scholarly phenomenon. Information, Communication & Society, 15(5), 662–679. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2012.678878 
 

Lazer, D., & Radford, J. (2017). Data ex machina: Introduction to big data. Annual Review of Sociology, 43, 19–39. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-soc-060116- 053457 
 

The Economist. (2010, February 25). New rules for big data. The Economist. Retrieved from https://www.economist.com/special-report/2010/02/25/new-rules-for-big-data
 

Workshop Required Reading:

One of the three example research proposals uploaded in the assessments section of Minerva

Brooker, P. (2020). Programming with Python for Social Scientists.  

      - Chapter Two: Programming as Social Science (Critical Coding) (p 37 – 46)  

      - Chapter Nine: Designing Research that Features Programming (p 176 – 183)

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Week 5: Research Proposal Development Week

No lectures, seminars or assigned readings this week. Use this time to prepare your one-page draft research proposal.

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Week 6: Corporate and State Technological Surveillance

Lecture Required Reading:

Kumar, P. (2017). Corporate Privacy Policy Changes during PRISM and the Rise of Surveillance Capitalism. Media and Communication, 5(1), pp. 63 – 75.
 

Liang, F., Das, V., Kostyuk, N., & Hussain, M. M. (2018). Constructing a Data-Driven Society: China's Social Credit System as a State Surveillance Infrastructure. Policy & Internet.
 

Courtland, R. (2018, 20 June). Bias detectives: the researchers striving to make algorithms fair. Nature News Feature. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586- 018-05469-3
 

Workshop Required Reading:

Brooker, P. (2020). Programming with Python for Social Scientists.  

      - Chapter 8. Useful Extra Concepts/Practices (p 141 – 169)  

      - Chapter 14: Visualising Data (p 255 – 284) 

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Week 7: Understanding Connections Online – Network Analysis & News Sharing

Lecture Required Reading:

Adamic, L. A., & Glance, N. (2005). The political blogosphere and the 2004 U.S. election: Divided they blog. In LinkKDD ’05: Proceedings of the 3rd international workshop on Link discovery (pp. 36–43). Chicago, IL. Retrieved from http://www.ramb.ethz.ch/CDstore/www2005-ws/workshop/wf10/AdamicGlanceBlogWWW.pdf 
 

Bright, J. (2016). The social news gap: How news reading and news sharing diverge. Journal of Communication, 66(3), 343–365. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcom.12232
 

Economist. (2010, September 2). Untangling the social web: Mining social networks. The Economist. Retrieved from https://www.economist.com/technology-quarterly/2010/09/04/untangling-the-social-web
 

Workshop Required Reading:

Brooker, P. (2020). Programming with Python for Social Scientists.  

      - Chapter 10: Working with text files (p 185 – 194)  

      - Chapter 12: Data Decoding/Encoding in Popular Formats (p 226 – 239)  

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Week 8: Reserach Proposal Peer Review

There is no lecture this week. You will be placed in small peer review groups based on your draft reserach proposals. Instead of the lecture and required readings for the lecture, you should read and draft feedback on the reserach propoals of other members of your group. In the workshops, you will engage in peer-review exercises with your group. You should come to the workshop having thought carefully about the tutor feedback on your proposal so that you can draw from the guidance of your peers to help you integrate and execute this feedback.

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Week 9: Agent-based modelling, smart cities and ethical considerations

Lecture Required Reading:

Jackson, Rand, D., Lewis, K., Norton, M. I., & Gray, K. (2017). Agent-Based Modeling: A Guide for Social Psychologists. Social Psychological & Personality Science, 8(4), 387–395. https://doi.org/10.1177/1948550617691100  

Levy, Martens, C. J. C. ., & Heijden, R. E. C. M. van der. (2016). Agent-based models and self-organisation: addressing common criticisms and the role of agent-based modelling in urban planning. Town Planning Review, 87(3), 321–338. https://doi.org/10.3828/tpr.2016.22  

Farmer, & Foley, D. (2009). The economy needs agent-based modelling. Nature (London), 460(7256), 685–686. https://doi.org/10.1038/460685a  

Workshop Required Reading:

To be confirmed

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Week 10: What Texts Can Tell Us about the Quality of Political Debate

Lecture Required Reading:

Gold, V., El-Assady, M., Hautli-Janisz, A., Bögel, T., Rohrdantz, C., Butt, M., ... Keim, D. (2017). Visual linguistic analysis of political discussions: Measuring deliberative quality. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, 32(1), 141–158. https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqv033  

Nithyanand, R., Schaffner, B., & Gill, P. (2017). Online political discourse in the Trump era. Retrieved from http://arxiv.org/abs/1711.05303  

Davis, J. (2017, November 29). Political comments on Reddit have dropped to the level of 6-year-olds. IFLScience. Retrieved from https://www.iflscience.com/technology/political-comments-on-reddit-have-dropped-to-the-level-of-6yearolds/  

Workshop Required Reading:

Brooker, P. (2020). Programming with Python for Social Scientists.  

      - Chapter 11: Data Collection: Using Social Media APIs (195 – 214) 

      - Chapter 13: Data collection: Web Scraping (p 241 – 254)  

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Week 11: Future Directions in Technology, Media and Politics

Lecture Required Reading:

Bolsover, G and Howard, P. N. (2017). Computational Propaganda and Political Big Data: Moving Toward a More Critical Research Agenda. Big Data, 5 (4). pp. 273- 276. ISSN 2167-6461  
 

Shen, H. (2018). Building a Digital Silk Road? Situating the Internet in China’s Belt and Road Initiative. International Journal of Communication12(2018),2683–2701.
 

Skelton, S. (2020). Surveillance capitalism in the age of Covid-19. https://www.computerweekly.com/feature/Surveillance-capitalism-in-the-age-of-Covid-19
 

Workshop Required Reading:

Read and explore the information on https://www.privacytools.io, which "provides knowledge and tools to protect your privacy against global mass surveillance" and in particular lists and evaluates privacy-focused software alternatives and solutions.Core

Think about what you might change in your interactions with technology based on what you have learnt in this course.

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Relevant Journals for this Module

Information, Communication and Society

New Media and Society

Political Communication

Policy and Internet

Journal of Communication

Journal of Information, Technology and Politics

International Journal of Communication

Social Media and Society

Computational Communication Research

Social Science Computer Review

EPJ Data Science

Journal of Computer Mediated Communication

Digital Journalism 

This list was last updated on 20/01/2022