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LUBS5326M
Module Reading List

Digitalization, Automation and the Future of Work, 2021/22, Semester 1
Charles Umney
c.r.umney@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Please note: lecture materials often include a lengthy reference list. This is to support and evidence the points made in the lectures. Below is the smaller set of sources we see as most relevant to each class. 

Digitalization and automation: Towards a jobless future?  

PRIMARY READING

Brynjolfsson, E. and McAfee, A., 2014. The second machine age: Work, progress, and prosperity in a time of brilliant technologies. WW Norton & Company. Chapter 2   Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Howcroft, D. and Rubery, J., 2019. ‘Bias in, Bias out’: gender equality and the future of work debate. Labour & Industry: a journal of the social and economic relations of work, 29(2), pp.213-227.    

Lazonick, W., 1979. Industrial relations and technical change: the case of the self-acting mule. Cambridge Journal of Economics, 3(3), pp.231-262.    

SECONDARY READING

Frey, C. B. and Osborne, M. A. (2017) ‘The future of employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?’, Technological Forecasting & Social Change, 114(C), pp. 254–280. doi: 10.1016/j.techfore.2016.08.019.

Autor, David H. 2015. "Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation." Journal of Economic Perspectives, 29 (3): 3-30?

Benanav, A., 2019. Automation and the Future of Work- Pt1. New Left Review, (119), pp.5-38.

Arntz, M., Gregory, Terry and Zierahn, Ulrich (2019) Digitalization and the Future of Work: Macroeconomic Consequences. Discussion paper 19–024. ZEW. Available at: http://ftp.zew.de/pub/zew-docs/dp/dp19024.pdf.

Spencer, D. and Slater, G. (2020) ‘No automation please, we’re British: technology and the prospects for work’, Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society. doi: 10.1093/cjres/rsaa003.

Shestakofsky, B., 2017. Working algorithms: Software automation and the future of work. Work and Occupations44(4), pp.376-423.

Neufeind, M., O’Reilly, J. and Ranft, F. (2018) Work in the digital age: challenges of the fourth industrial revolution Identifying the challenges for work in the digital age. London: Rowman & Littlefield International Ltd. Available at: https://policynetwork.org/features/work-digital-age/.

Cole, M., Radice, H. and Umney, C. (2021) ‘The Political Economy of Datafication and Work: A New Digital Taylorism?’, in Socialist Register 2021: Beyond Digital Capitalism: New Ways of Living. New York, New York: Monthly Review Press.

 

Moore, P. V., Upchurch, M. and Whittaker, X. (2017) Humans and Machines at Work : Monitoring, Surveillance and Automation in Contemporary Capitalism. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan US (Book, Whole). doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-58232-0.

 

AI and platform work

CORE READING FOR THIS SEMINAR

Wood, A. J., Graham, M., Lehdonvirta, V., & Hjorth, I. (2019). Good gig, bad gig: autonomy and algorithmic control in the global gig economy. Work, Employment and Society33(1), 56-75.

OTHER RELEVANT READING

Forde, C. Stuart, M., Joyce, S. Oliver, L.,Valizade, Alberti, G., Hardy, K., Trappman, V. Umney, C., Carson, C. (2017) The Platform economy: definitions and typologies; Platform work and Platform workers, definitions and typologies (Chapter 2 and 3 of p. 19-59;). In Forde et al. The social protection of workers in the platform economy. Employment and Social Affair Committee, European Parliament. Available at https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2017/614184/IPOL_STU(2017)614184_EN.pdf

De Stefano, V. (2015). The rise of the just-in-time workforce: On-demand work, crowdwork, and labor protection in the gig-economy. Comp. Lab. L. & Pol'y J.37, 471.

Huws, U., Spencer, N. H., & Syrdal, D. S. (2018). Online, on call: the spread of digitally organised just‐in‐time working and its implications for standard employment models. New Technology, Work and Employment33(2), 113-129.

Huws, U., Spencer, N., Syrdal, D. S., & Holts, K. (2017). Work in the European gig economy: Research results from the UK, Sweden, Germany, Austria, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Italy. Esp. pp. 9-11 and 39- 49  (The experiences, perceptions and opinions of crowd workers)

Neufeind, M., O'Reilly, J., & Ranft, F. (2018). Work in the digital age: challenges of the fourth industrial revolution. Rowan & Littlefield. (Especially chapters by Huws et al.; De Stefano and Berg; Schor, Palier, Doellgast)

Graham, M., Lehdonvirta, V., Wood, A., Barnard, H., & Hjorth, I. (2018). Could online gig work drive development in lower-income countries?. In The Future of Work in the Global South Eds Galperin, H and Alarcon, A.

Moore, P. V., Upchurch, M., & Whittaker, X. (2018). Humans and machines at work: monitoring, surveillance and automation in contemporary capitalism. In Humans and Machines at Work (pp. 1-16). Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

Schor, J. (2020). After the Gig: How the Sharing Economy Got Hijacked and How to Win It Back. Univ of California Press.

Vallas, S., & Schor, J. B. (2020). What Do Platforms Do? Understanding the Gig Economy. Annual Review of Sociology46.

Vandaele, K. (2018). Will trade unions survive in the platform economy? Emerging patterns of platform workers’ collective voice and representation in EuropeEmerging Patterns of Platform Workers’ Collective Voice and Representation in Europe (June 19, 2018). ETUI Research Paper-Working Paper.

Wu, Q., Zhang, H., Li, Z., & Liu, K. (2019). Labor control in the gig economy: Evidence from Uber in China. Journal of Industrial Relations61(4), 574-596.

 

Digitalization and work quality

PRIMARY READING

 Frey, C. B. and Osborne, M. A. (2017) ‘The future of employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?’, Technological Forecasting & Social Change, 114(C), pp. 254–280. doi: 10.1016/j.techfore.2016.08.019.

 

Forde et al. (2017) Social Protection of Workers in the Platform Economy. Brussels: European Parliament. Available at: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2017/614184/IPOL_STU(2017)614184_EN.pdf.

 

Mullan K, Wajcman J. Have Mobile Devices Changed Working Patterns in the 21st Century? A Time-diary Analysis of Work Extension in the UK. Work, Employment and Society. 2019;33(1):3-20. doi:10.1177/0950017017730529.

 

Holman D. Job types and job quality in Europe. Human Relations. 2013;66(4):475-502. doi:10.1177/0018726712456407

 

Autor, David H., Frank Levy, and Richard J. Murnane. 2003. “The Skill Content of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 118(4): 1279–1333.

 

OECD (2019) Preparing for the changing nature of work in the digital era, OECD Going Digital Policy Note, OECD, Paris, https://www.oecd.org/going-digital/changing-nature-of-work-in-the-digital-era.pdf

 

Bisello et al (2019) How computerisation is transforming jobs: Evidence from Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey, JRC Working Paper Series on Labour, Education and Technology, No. 2019/02, European Commission, Joint Research Center (JRC), Seville, https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/202319/1/jrc-wplet201902.pdf

 

Deloitte (2017) The connected workers, Available at: https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/tr/Documents/human-capital/deloitte-the-connected-worker.pdf

 

Visual capitalist: https://www.visualcapitalist.com/connected-workers-digital-transformation-future/

 

SECONDARY READING

 

Wajcman, J, Rose, E (2011) Constant connectivity: Rethinking interruptions at work. Organization Studies 32(7): 941–961.

 

Autor, David H. 2015. "Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation." Journal of Economic Perspectives, 29 (3): 3-30.

 

Ailani, D. & Peña-Casas, Ramón & Coster, Stephanie. (2018). The impact of digitalisation on job quality in European public services the case of homecare and employment service workers, European Social Observatory, Available at:

https://www.epsu.org/sites/default/files/article/files/THE%20IMPACT%20OF%20DIGITALISATION%20ON%20JOB%20QUALITY%20-%20annexes.pdf

 

 

Digitalization and HRM Functions

CORE READING

Tambe, P., Cappelli, P., & Yakubovich, V. (2019). Artificial intelligence in human resources management: Challenges and a path forward. California Management Review, 61(4), 15-42.

OTHER RELEVANT READING

Angrave, D., Charlwood, A., Kirkpatrick, I., Lawrence, M., & Stuart, M. (2016). HR and analytics: why HR is set to fail the big data challenge. Human Resource Management Journal, 26(1), 1-11. 

Bondarouk, T., Parry, E., & Furtmueller, E. (2017). Electronic HRM: four decades of research on adoption and consequences. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 28(1), 98-131.

Dubey, R., Gunasekaran, A., Childe, S. J., Blome, C., & Papadopoulos, T. (2019). Big data and predictive analytics and manufacturing performance: integrating institutional theory, resource‐based view and big data culture. British Journal of Management, 30(2), 341-361.

Lepak, D. P., & Snell, S. A. (1998). Virtual HR: Strategic human resource management in the 21st century. Human resource management review, 8(3), 215-234.

Moore, P., & Robinson, A. (2016). The quantified self: What counts in the neoliberal workplace. new media & society, 18(11), 2774-2792

Strohmeier, S. and Piazza, F., 2015. Artificial intelligence techniques in human resource management—a conceptual exploration. In Intelligent techniques in engineering management (pp. 149-172). Springer, Cham. 

 

Digitalization, Equality and Diversity

CORE READING FOR THIS SEMINAR

West, S.M., Whittaker, M. and Crawford, K. (2019) Discriminating Systems: Gender, Race and Power in AI. New York: AI Now Institute.

OTHER RELEVANT READING

Bogen, M. (2018) ‘Help wanted: an examination of hiring algorithms, equity, and bias’, Upturn (December). Available at:

https://www.upturn.org/static/reports/2018/hiring-algorithms/files/Upturn%20--%20Help%20Wanted%20-%20An%20Exploration%20of%20Hiring%20Algorithms,%20Equity%20and%20Bias.pdf

Eubanks, V. (2018) Automating Inequality. New York: St Martin’s Press.

European Commission (2020) White Paper: On Artificial Intelligence: A European Approach to Excellence and Trust. (Brussels, 19.2.2020 COM(2020) 65 final).

Howcroft, D. and Rubery, J. (2017) Gender Equality prospect and the Fourth Industrial Revolution in Neufeind, M., O'Reilly, J., & Ranft, F. (2018). Work in the digital age: challenges of the fourth industrial revolution. Rowan & Littlefield

Piasna, A. and Drahokoupil, J. (2017) Gender inequalities in the new world of work, Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, 23(3). pp. 249-52.

Schor, J. “The Platform Economy: consequences for labour, inequality and the environment,” 2018, The Fourth Industrial Revolution: Opportunities and Threats to Work and Welfare, eds. Jacqueline O’Reilly, Max Neufeind, and Florian Ranft (London: Roman and Littlefield International).

 Schor J 2017, "Does the Sharing Economy Increase Inequality Within the Eighty Percent?: Findings from a Qualitative Study of Platform Providers," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, available at: https://academic.oup.com/cjres/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/cjres/rsw047/2982086/Does-the-sharing-economy-increase-inequality?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Rennie, J. (2019) ‘Can an algorithm eradicate bias in our decision making?’ Personnel Today, 29 August.

DAUGHERTY, P.R., WILSON, H.J. and CHOWDHURY, R. (2019) Using artificial intelligence to promote diversity. MIT Sloan Management Review. Vol 80, No 2, Winter. Reviewed in In a Nutshell, issue 84.

Leicht-Deobald, U., Busch, T., Schank, C., Weibel, A., Schafheitle, S., Wildhaber, I., & Kasper, G. (2019). The challenges of algorithm-based HR decision-making for personal integrity. Journal of Business Ethics160(2), 377-392.

Holmes, A (2015) Has ‘Diversity’ Lost Its Meaning?, The New York Times Magazine, October 27, 2015, https://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/01/magazine/has-diversity-lost-its-meaning.html.

Digitalization, work-life balance and quality of working life 

 

Primary Reading

 Mullan K, Wajcman J. Have Mobile Devices Changed Working Patterns in the 21st Century? A Time-diary Analysis of Work Extension in the UK. Work, Employment and Society. 2019;33(1):3-20. doi:10.1177/0950017017730529.

Wajcman, J, Bittman, M, Brown, JE (2008) Families without borders: Mobile phones, connectedness and work-home divisions. Sociology 42(4): 635–652.

Mazmanian, M, Orlikowski, WJ, Yates, J (2013) The autonomy paradox: The implications of mobile email devices for knowledge professionals. Organization Science 24(5): 1337–1357.

Duxbury, L, Higgins, C, Smart, R. (2014) Mobile technology and boundary permeability. British Journal of Management 25(3): 570–588.

Chesley, N (2005) Blurring boundaries? Linking technology use, spillover, individual distress, and family satisfaction. Journal of Marriage and Family 67(5): 1237–1248.

Wajcman, J, Rose, E (2011) Constant connectivity: Rethinking interruptions at work. Organization Studies 32(7): 941–961.

Secondary Reading

 Davies, AR, Frink, B (2014) The origins of the ideal worker: The separation of work and home in the United States from the market revolution to 1950. Work and Occupations 41(1): 18–39.

Barley, SR, Meyerson, DE, Grodal, S (2011) E-mail as a source and symbol of stress. Organization Science 22(4): 887–906.

Perlow, L (2012) Sleeping with Your Smartphone. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press.

Wajcman, J (2015) Pressed for Time: The Acceleration of Life in Digital Capitalism. Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press

 

Green jobs and the "just transition"

CORE READING FOR THIS SEMINAR

Mazzucato, M., & McPherson, M. (2019). What the Green Revolution Can Learn from the IT Revolution. IIPP Policy Brief. Available here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/public-purpose/publications/2019/aug/what-green-revolution-can-learn-it-revolution

OTHER RELEVANT READING

Clarke, Linda, and Carla Lipsig-Mummé. "Future conditional: From just transition to radical transformation?." European Journal of Industrial Relations 26.4 (2020): 351-366.

Consoli, D., Marin, G., Marzucchi, A., & Vona, F. (2016). Do green jobs differ from non-green jobs in terms of skills and human capital?. Research Policy45(5), 1046-1060.

Goods, C. (2017). Climate change and employment relations. Journal of Industrial Relations59(5), 670-679.

Iskander, N., & Lowe, N. (2020). Climate Change and Work: Politics and Power. Annual Review of Political Science, 23, 111-131.

Jackson, S. E., Renwick, D. W., Jabbour, C. J., & Muller-Camen, M. (2011). State-of-the-art and future directions for green human resource management: Introduction to the special issue. German Journal of Human Resource Management, 25(2), 99-116.

Mazzucato, M., & McPherson, M. (2019). What the Green Revolution Can Learn from the IT Revolution. IIPP Policy Brief. Available here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/public-purpose/publications/2019/aug/what-green-revolution-can-learn-it-revolution

Newell, P., & Mulvaney, D. (2013). The political economy of the ‘just transition’. The Geographical Journal179(2), 132-140.

Renwick, D., Redman, T., & Maguire, S. (2008). Green HRM: A review, process model, and research agenda. University of Sheffield Management School Discussion Paper1, 1-46.

Renwick, D. W., Redman, T., & Maguire, S. (2013). Green human resource management: A review and research agenda. International Journal of Management Reviews15(1), 1-14.

Stevis, D., & Felli, R. (2015). Global labour unions and just transition to a green economy. International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics15(1), 29-43.

Social protection and welfare in a context of digitalisation and automation

PRIMARY READING

van Doorn, N. (2017) ‘Platform labor: on the gendered and racialized exploitation of low-income service work in the “on-demand” economy’, Information, Communication & Society, 20(6), pp. 898–914. doi: 10.1080/1369118X.2017.1294194.

Cottom, T. M. (2020) ‘Where Platform Capitalism and Racial Capitalism Meet: The Sociology of Race and Racism in the Digital Society’, Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, 6(4), pp. 441–449. doi: 10.1177/2332649220949473.

Fairwork (2020) Fairwork 2020 Annual Report. Fairwork: Oxford Internet Institute. Available at: https://fair.work/wp-content/uploads/sites/131/2020/12/Fairwork-2020-Annual-Report.pdf.

SECONDARY READING

Moore, S. and Hayes, L. J. B. (2017) ‘Taking worker productivity to a new level? Electronic Monitoring in homecare—the (re)production of unpaid labour’, New Technology, Work and Employment, 32(2), pp. 101–114. doi: 10.1111/ntwe.12087.

Forde et al. (2017) Social Protection of Workers in the Platform Economy. Brussels: European Parliament. Available at: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2017/614184/IPOL_STU(2017)614184_EN.pdf.

Berg, J. et al. (2018) Digital labour platforms and the future of work: Towards decent work in the online world. Brussels: International Labour Organization. Available at: https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---dcomm/---publ/documents/publication/wcms_645337.pdf.

Stanford, J. (2017) ‘The resurgence of gig work: Historical and theoretical perspectives’, The Economic and Labour Relations Review, 28(3), pp. 382–401. doi: 10.1177/1035304617724303.

Gandini, A. (2018) ‘Labour process theory and the gig economy’, Human Relations, 72(6), pp. 1039–1056. doi: 10.1177/0018726718790002.

Srnicek, N. (2016) Platform Capitalism. GB: Polity.

Moore, P. (2019) The Threat of Physical and Psychosocial Violence and Harassment in Digitalized Work. Brussels: International Labour Organization. Available at: https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_dialogue/---actrav/documents/publication/wcms_617062.pdf.

 

This list was last updated on 26/10/2021