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HIST3360
HIST3360 Module Reading List

Body, Mind and Senses: The Social and Cultural History of Disability in Britain, 1833-1998, 2021/22, Semester 1, 2
Jessica Meyer
j.k.meyer@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

GENERAL HISTORIES & BACKGROUND READINGS

You may find the following readings useful to get a sense of the context and some key themes developments throughout the period as we progress through the module.

Borsay, Anne, Disability and Social Policy in Britain Since 1750 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005).

Campbell, J. and Oliver, M., Disability Politics: Understanding Our Past, Changing Our Future (Routledge, 1996).

Finlayson, G. Citizen, State and Social Welfare in Britain, 1830-1990 (Clarendon Press, 1994)   

Gerber, D. Disabled Veterans in History (University of Michigan Press, 2000).   

Hampton, Jameel, Disability and the welfare state in Britain : changes in perception and policy 1948-1979 (Policy Press, 2016).

Humphries, S. and Gordon, P., Out of Sight: The Experience of Disability, 1900-1950 (Northcote Hose, 1992)

Melling, J. and Forsythe, B. (eds) Insanity, Institutions and Society: A Social History of Madness in Comparative Perspective (Routledge, 1999)

Oliver, M. and Barnes, C. The New Politics of Disablement (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)

Pelling, M, and Smith, R. M. (eds) Life, Death and the Elderly: Historical Perspectives (Routledge, 1991)

Striker, Henri-Jacques, A History of Disability (University of Michigan Press, 1999).
 

Rose, Sarah F. No Right to Be Idle: The Invention of Disability 1840s-1930s (University of North Carolina Press, 2017)
 

Shah, Sonali, & Priestley, Mark, Disability and social change private lives and public policies (Policy Press, 2011).

WEEK 1: What is disability?

Set readings

Ernst, Waltraud, ‘The Normal and Abnormal: Historical and Conceptual Perspectives in Norms and Normativity’ in Histories of the Normal and the Abnormal: Social and Cultural Histories of Norms and Normativity (Routledge, 2007), pp.1-25

Kudlick, Catherine J., ‘Comment: On the Borderlands of Medical and Disability History’, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 87:4 (2013), 540-59. 

Linker, Beth, ‘On the Borderland of Medical and Disability History: A Survey of the Fields’, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 87:4 (2013), 499-535.

Further readings

Anderson, J. and A. Carden-Coyne, ‘Enabling the Past: New Perspectives in the History of Disability’, European Review of History: Revue européenne d’histoire 13:4 (2006), 447-457

Barnes, Colin, ‘Theories of disability and the origins of the oppression of disabled people in western society’ in Disability and Society: Emerging Issues and Insights, ed. by Len Barton (Routledge, 1996), pp.43-60.
  Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Blaxter, Mildred, The Meaning of Disability: A Sociological Study of Impairment (Heinemann, 1976).

Bourke, Joanna, What it Means to Be Human: Reflections from 1791 to the Present (Virago, 2011).

Davis, Lennard J. Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness and the Body (Verso, 1995).

Hennock, Ernest P., The Origins of the Welfare State in England and Germany 1850-1914: Social Policies Compared(Cambridge University Press, 2007), Part II.   

Esmail, Jennifer and Christopher Keep, ‘Victorian Disability: Introduction’, Victorian Review, 35:2 (2009), 45-51.

Marks, Deborah, Disability: Controversial Debates and Psychosocial Perspectives (Routledge, 1999).

McGuire, C. Measuring difference, numbering normal : setting the standards for disability in the interwar period (Manchester University Press, 2020).

Mitchell, David T. and Sharon Snyder, Narrative Prosthesis: Disability and Dependencies of Discourse (University of Michigan Press, 2000)

________. ‘Introduction: Disability studies and the double bind of representation’ in The Body and Physical Difference: Discourses of Disability (University of Michigan Press, 1997), pp.1-34 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Quinn, Michael, ‘Jeremy Bentham on Physical Disability: A Problem for Whom?’, Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 8:4 (2012), 19-32. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58541

Wilson, James C. and Cynthia Lewieki-Wilson (eds), Embodied Rhetorics: Disability in Language and Culture (Southern Illinois Press, 2001).   

WEEK 2: The Politics of Disability

Set readings

Brundage, Anthony, The English Poor Laws, 1700-1930 (Palgrave, 2002), Chapter 5.   Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Flinn, M. W., ‘Medical Services under the New Poor Law’ in Derek Fraser (ed.), The New Poor Law in the Nineteenth Century (Macmillan, 1976), pp.45-66.
 
 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Levine-Clark, M., ‘”The Entombment of Thomas Shaw”: Mining Accidents and the Politics of Workers’ Bodies’, Victorian Review, 40:2 (2014), 22-26.

Further readings

Bartlett, Peter, The Poor Law of Lunacy: The Administration of Pauper Lunatics in Mid-Nineteenth-Century England (PhD thesis, Univesity of London, 1993) https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1317954/.

Bartrip, P. W. J. The Home Office and the Dangerous Trades: Regulating Occupational Disease in Victorian and Edwardian Britain (Brill, 2002)
  

Bartrip, P. W. J. and S. B. Burnam, The Wounded Soldiers of Industry: Industrial Compensation Policy 1833-1897 (Clarendon Press, 1983)

Fennel, P., Treatment Without Consent: Law, Psychiatry and the Treatment of Mentally Disordered People Since 1845 (Routledge, 1996)

Freeden, M., ‘Eugenics and Progressive Though: A Study in Ideological Affinity’, Historical Journal, 22: 3 (1979), 645-671.

Giles, Audrey C., ‘Railway Accidents and Nineteenth-Century Legislation: “Misconduct, Want of Caution or Causes beyond their Control”’, Labour History Review, 76:2 (2011), 121-42.

Gooding, C., ‘Disability Discrimination Act: From Statute to Practice’, Critical Social Policy 20:4 (2000), 533-549.

Hollen Lees, Lynn, The Solidarities of Strangers: The English Poor Laws and the People, 1700-1948 (Cambridge University Press, 1998)

Jones, Greta, ‘Eugenics and Social Policy Between the Wars’, The Historical Journal 25:3 (1982), 717-728.

Thomson, Mathew, The Problem of Mental Deficiency: Eugenics, Democracy, and Social Policy in Britain c. 1870-1959 (Clarendon Press, 2001).
 

Turner, David M. and Daniel Blackie, Disability in the Industrial Revolution: Physical Impairment in British Coalmining, 1780-1880 (Manchester University Press, 2018), Chapter 5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK513198/

Wright, D., ‘Learning Disability and the New Poor Law in England, 1834-1867’, Disability & Society 15:5 (2000), 731-745

WEEK 3: Disabled Economies

Set readings

Gorsky, Martin, ‘The Growth and Distribution of English Friendly Societies in the Early Nineteenth Century’, Economic History Review, 52 (1998), 489-511

Schneider, J., K. Simons and G. Everatt, ‘Impact of the National Minimum Wage on Disabled People’, Disability & Society 16:5 (2001), 729-747.

Whiteside, N. ‘Counting the Cost: Sickness and Disability Among Working People in an Era of Industrial Recession, 1920-1939’, Economic History Review 40:2 (1987), 228-246.

Further readings

Benson, John, ‘Coalminers, Accidents and Insurance in Late Nineteenth-Century England’ in Bernard Harris, ed., Welfare and Old Age in Europe and North America (Pickering & Chatto, 2012), pp.9-26.
  

Bolderson, Helen, ‘The Origins of the Disabled Persons Employment Quota and its Symbolic Significance’, Journal of Social Policy 9 (1980), 169-186.

Broten, Nicholas, ‘From Sickness to Death: Revisiting the Financial Viability of English Friendly Societies, 1875-1908’ in Bernard Harris, ed., Welfare and Old Age in Europe and North America (Pickering & Chatto, 2012), pp.107-120.

Quick, Michael, ‘Mid-Victorian Compensation Culture’, Journal of the Railway and Canal History Society, 192 (2005), 110-17. https://rchs.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/Journal-192-Jul-2005.pdf

Rose, Sarah F., ‘”Crippled” Hands: Disability in Labor and Working-Class History, Labor 2:1 (2005), 27-54.

Sharpe, Pamela, ‘Explaining the Short Stature of the Poor: Chronic Childhood Disease and Growth in Nineteenth-Century England’, Economic History Review 65:4 (2012), 1475-94.

Szreter, Simon, Health and Wealth: Studies in History and Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2012)
 

Walton, J. K., ‘Lunacy in the Industrial Revolution’, Journal of Social History 13: 1 (1979), 1-22.

WEEK 4: The Medicalization of Disabilities

Set readings

Conrad, Peter, The Medicalization of Society: On the Transformation of Human Conditions into Treatable Disorders (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007), Chapter 1.   OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (MH 29/09/2021) 

Hewitt, Rachel, ‘Social Stigma, Stress and Enforced Transition in Specialist Epilepsy Services 1905-1965’ in Steven J. Taylor and Alice Brumby, eds., Healthy Minds in the Twentieth Century: In and Beyond the Asylum (Springer, 2020), pp.53-72. https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-030-27275-3
 

Virdi, Jaipreet, ‘Medicalizing deafness in Victorian London: the Royal Ear Hospital, 1816-1916’ in Iain Hutchison, Martin Atherton and Jaipreet Virdi, eds., Disability and the Victorians: Attitudes, Interventions, Legacies (Manchester University Press, 2020), unpaginated.
   Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Further readings

Armstrong, D., Political Anatomy of the Body: Medical Knowledge in Britain in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press, 1983) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328560727_Political_Anatomy_of_the_Body_Medical_knowledge_in_Britain_in_the_twentieth_century

Conrad, Peter, ‘Medicalization as Social Control’, Annual Review of Sociology 18 (1992), 209-232.

Jackson, Mark, The Borderland of Imbecility: Medicine, Society and the Fabrication of the Feeble Mind in Late Victorian and Edwardian England (Manchester University Press, 2000)
  

________. ‘Institutional provision for the feeble-minded in Edwardian England: Sandlebridge and the scientific morality of permanent care’ in D. Wright and A. Digby, From Idiocy to Mental Deficiency: Historical Perspectives on People with Learning Disabilities (Routledge, 1996), pp.161-183.

Lane, H. The Mask of Benevolence: Disabling the Deaf Community (Vintage, 1993)

Sutherland, Gillian, Ability, Merit and Measurement: Mental Testing and English Education, 1880-1940 (Clarendon Press, 1984)

Scull, Andrew, The Most Solitary of Afflictions: Madness and Society in Britain, 1700-1900 (Yale University Press, 1993)

WEEK 5: War and Violence

Set Reading:

Anderson, J., M. Salvante and P. Verstraete (eds.), ‘Commemorating the Disabled Soldier’, First World War Studies Special Issue 6, 1 (2015), 1-7.

Edgerton, D., ‘War and the Development of the British Welfare State’ in H. Obinger, K. Petersen and P. Starke, eds., Warfare and Welfare: Military Conflict and Welfare State Development in Western Countries, (Oxford University Press, 2018), p.200-229

Gerber, D.A., ‘Disabled Veterans, the State, and the Experience of Disability in Western Societies, 1914-1950’, Journal of Social History 34 (2003), pp.899-916 

Further Reading:

Anderson, Julie, ‘”Jumpy Stump”: amputation and trauma in the First World War’, First World War Studies, 6:1(2015), 9-19, DOI: 10.1080/19475020.2015.1016581

________, ‘Separating the Surgical and Commercial: Space, Prosthetics and the First World War’ in Claire Jones (ed.), Rethinking Modern Prostheses in Anglo-American Commodity Cultures 1820-1939 (Manchester University Press), pp.158-178

________, War, Disability and Rehabilitation in Britain: ‘Soul of a Nation’ (2011).

Anderson, Julie and Neil Pemberton, ‘Walking Alone: Aiding the War and Civilian Blind in the Inter-war Period’, European Review of History: Revue européenne d’histoire 14:4 (2007), 459-479.

Biernoff, S., ‘The Rhetoric of Disfigurement in First World War Britain’, Social History of Medicine 24, (2011), pp.666-685

Bourke, Joanna. Dismembering the Male: Men’s Bodies, Britain and the Great War (Reaktion, 1996), pp.31-75
 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

________. ‘Effeminacy, Ethnicity and the End of Trauma: The Sufferings of ‘Shell-shocked’ Men in Great Britain and Ireland, 1914-1929, Journal of Contemporary History 35:1 (2000), 57-69.

Cohen, D., The War Come Home: Disabled Veterans in Britain and Germany, 1914-1939 (1999)

Cooter, R. Surgery and Society in Peace and War: Orthopaedics and the Organization of Modern Medicine, 1880-1948 (Palgrave Macmillan, 1993)

Elsey, Ena, ‘Disabled Ex-Servicemen’s Experiences of Rehabilitation and Employment After the First World War’, Oral History 25: 2 (1997), 49-58.

Gerber, David A., ‘Disabled Veterans and the Wounds of War’ in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (Oxford University Press, 2018), unpaginated.

Jones, E., et. al., ‘Post-combat syndromes from the Boer War to the Gulf: a cluster analysis of their nature and attribution’ British Medical Journal (Clinical Research Ed.), 324 (2002), pp.321-324

Larsson, M., ‘Restoring the Spirit: The Rehabilitation of Disable Soldiers in Australia after the Great War’, Health and Society, 6 (2004), pp.52-3. https://doi.org/10.2307/40111483

________. Shattered Anzacs: Living with the Scars of War (2009)

Meyer, J. ‘”A Blind Man’s Homecoming”: Masculinity, Disability, and Male Caregiving in First World War Britain’ in Phallacies: Historical Intersections of Disability and Masculinity, ed. by Kathleen M. Brian and James W. Trent, Jr. (2017), pp.153-170.

________. Men of War: Masculinity and the First World War in Britain (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), Chapter 4.

________. ‘Wounded in a Mentionable Place: The (In)visibility of the Disabled Ex-serviceman in Interwar Britain’ in Veterans of the First World War: Ex-Servicemen and Ex-Servicewomen in Post-War Britain and Ireland, ed. by David Swift and Oliver Wilkinson (2019), pp,158-171 .

Malone, C., ‘A job fit for heroes? Disabled veterans, the Arts and Crafts Movement and Social Reconstruction in post-World War I Britain’, First World War Studies 4 (2013), pp.201-18

Purdy, M., ‘Paternalism and Prosthetics: Life for Disabled Veterans and their Families on a Post-war Settlement’ in Veterans of the First World War: Ex-Servicemen and Ex-Servicewomen in Post-War Britain and Ireland, ed. by David Swift and Oliver Wilkinson (2019), 142-157.

WEEK 6:

Set readings

Jack, Raymond, ‘Introduction’ in Raymond Jack (ed.), Residential Versus Community Care: The Role of Institutions in Welfare Provision (Macmillan, 1998), pp.1-9.   Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Hampton, Jameel, Disability and the welfare state in Britain: Changes in perception and policy 1948-1979 (Policy Press, 2016), Introduction. 

Harris, Bernard, et al., ‘Sickness Insurance and Welfare Reform in England and Wales, 1870-1914’ in Bernard Harris, ed., Welfare and Old Age in Europe and North America (Pickering & Chatto, 2012), pp.89-106.   Available online 

Further readings

Boyer, George, The Winding Road to the Welfare State: Economic Insecurity and Social Welfare Policy in Britain (Princeton University Press, 2018)
  

Crowther, M. A. ‘Family Responsibility and State Responsibility in Britain before the Welfare State’, Historical Journal25 (1982), 131-45.

Cronin, James, The Politics of State Expansion: War, State and Society in Twentieth-Century Britain (Routledge, 1991)

Fraser, Derek, The Evolution of the British Welfare State: A History of Social Policy Since the Industrial Revolution (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009)

Hennock, Ernest P., The Origins of the Welfare State in England and Germany 1850-1914: Social Policies Compared (Cambridge University Press, 2007), Part III.  

Hughes, Gordon and Ross Fergusson, eds., Ordering Lives: Family, Work and Welfare (Routledge, 2000)

Laybourn, Keith, The Evolution of British Social Policy and the Welfare State: c.1800-1993 (Keele University Press, 1995)

Means, R. and R. Smith, From Poor Law to Community Care: The Development of Welfare Services for Elderly People, 1939-1971

(Policy Press, 1998)

Mommsen, W. J., and W. Mock, The emergence of the welfare state in Britain and Germany 1850-1950 (Croom Helm, 1981), Chapters 1 and 3.
 

Moses, Julia, The First Modern Risk: Workplace Accidents and the Origins of European Social States (Cambridge University Press, 2018)  

Stone, Deborah, Disabled State (Macmillan, 1985)  

Thomson, D., ‘The Decline of Social Welfare: Falling State Support for the Elderly Since Early Victorian Times’, Ageing and Society, 4:4 (1984), 451-482.

Townsend, P., ‘The Structured Dependency of the Elderly: A Creation of Social Policy in the Twentieth Century’, Ageing and Society1:1 (1981), 5-28.

WEEK 7: Disability and the Workplace

Set readings

Blackie, Daniel, ‘Disability and Work in the Industrial Revolution in Britain’ in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen, The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (Oxford University Press, 2018), unpaginated.
 

Holroyde, Andy, ‘Sheltered Employment and Mental Health in Britain: Remploy c.1945-1981’ in Steven J. Taylor and Alice Brumby, eds., Healthy Minds in the Twentieth Century: In and Beyond the Asylum (Springer, 2020), pp.113-135. https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-030-27275-3
 

Morris, Rosa, ‘Disabled People and Employment: A UK Perspective’ in Nick Watson, Alan Roultone and Carol Thomas (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies (Routledge, 2012), pp.250-264.
 

Further readings

Bartrip, P. W. J. and P. T. Fenn, ‘The Measurement of Safety: Factory Accident Statistics in Victorian and Edwardian Britain’, Historical Research 63 (1999), pp. 58-72.

Benson, John, ‘English Coal-Miners’ Trade-Union Accident Funds, 1850-1900’, Economic History Review 28:3 (1975), 401-12.

Bronstein, Jamie L. Caught in the Machinery: Workplace Accidents and Injured Workers in Nineteenth-Century Britain (Stanford University Press, 2008).
    

________. 'The Hartley Colliery Disaster', Victorian Review 40:2 (2014), 9-13.

Farnbach Pearson, Amy W., ‘Restoring to Usefulness: Victorian middle-class attitudes towards the healthcare of the working poor’ in Iain Hutchison, Martin Atherton and Jaipreet Virdi, eds., Disability and the Victorians: Attitudes, Interventions, Legacies (Manchester University Press, 2020), unpaginated.

Kirby, Peter, Child Workers and Industrial Health in Britain, 1780-1850 (Boydell Press, 2013).

McIvor, Arthur and Ronal Johnston, Miners’ Lung: A History of Dust Disease in British Coal Mining (Ashgate, 2007)
 

Mantin, Mike, ‘Coalmining and the National Scheme for Disabled Ex-Servicemen after the First World War’, Social History, 41:2 (2016), 155-70.

Sturdy, Steve, ‘The Industrial Body’ in Roger Cooter and John Pickstone (eds), Companion to Medicine in the Twentieth Century (Routledge, 2003), pp.217-34.
 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

WEEK 8: Disability in the Home

Set readings

Curtis, Ben and Steven Thompson, ‘Disability and the Family in South Wales Coalfield Society, c.1920-1939’, Family & Community History 20:1 (2017), 25-44.

King, Steven, ‘Constructing the Disabled Child in England, 1800-1860’, Family & Community History18 (2015), 104-21.

Thomson, D., ‘”I am not my father’s keeper”: Families and the Elderly in Nineteenth-Century England’, Law and History Review, 2:2 (1984), 265-286.

Further readings

Bartlett, P. and Wright, D. (eds.) Outside the Walls of the Asylum: A History of Care in the Community, 1750-2000 (Athlone, 1999), Chapters 3 and 6.

Koven, Seth and Sonya Michel, Mothers of a New World: Maternalist Politics and the Origins of the Welfare State (Routledge, 1993)

Larsen, Marina, ‘Families and Institutions for Shell-Shocked Soldiers in Australia after the First World War’, Social History of Medicine, 22 (2009), pp.97-114

McLaughlin, Janice, ‘Understanding Disabled Families: Replacing Tales of Burden with Ties of Interdependency’ in Nick Watson, Alan Roultone and Carol Thomas (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies (Routledge, 2012), pp.479-491

Peretz, Elizabeth, “The Costs of Modern Motherhood to Low Income Families in Interwar Britain”, in Valerie Fildes, Lara Marks and Hilary Marland (eds.), Women and Children First: International Maternal and Infant Welfare, 1870-1945 (London: Routledge, 1992), pp.257-281
 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Purdy, Martin, ‘Paternalism and prosthetics: life for disabled veterans and their families on a post-war settlement’ in David Swift and Oliver Wilkinson, eds., Veterans of the First World War: Ex-Servicemen and Ex-Servicewomen in Post-War Britain and Ireland (Routledge, 2019), pp142-157.

Tarr, Joel A. and Mark Tebeau, ‘Housewives as Home Safety Managers: The Changing Perception of the Home as a Place of Hazard and Risk, 1870-1940’ in Roger Cooter and Bill Luckin (eds), Accidents in History: Injuries, Fatalities and Social Relations (Brill, 1997), pp.196-233  

Wright, David, ‘Familial Care of ‘Idiot’ Children in Victorian England’ in Peregrine Horden and Richard Smith, eds., The Locus of Care: Families, Communities, Institutions and the Provision of Welfare Since Antiquity (Routledge, 1997), 176-197.
 

WEEK 9: Institutions and Institutionalisation

Set readings

Gittins, D. Madness in its Place: Narratives of Severalls Hospital 1913-1997 (Routledge, 1998), pp.1-28.
 Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Melling, Joseph, ‘Accommodating madness: new research in the social history of insanity and institutions’ in J. Melling and B. Forsythe (eds), Insanity, Institutions and Society: A Social History of Madness in Comparative Perspective (Routledge, 1999), pp.1-30. 

Scull, Andrew, ‘Museums of Madness Revisited’, Social History of Medicine 6:1 (1993), 3-23. 

Further readings

Adair, R., B. Forsythe and J. Melling, ‘A Danger to the Public?: Disposing of Pauper Lunatics in Late-Victorian and Edwardian England: Plympton St Mary Union and the Devon County Asylum, 1867-1914’, Medical History, 42 (1998), 1-25.

Bartlett, P. and Wright, D. (eds.) Outside the Walls of the Asylum: A History of Care in the Community, 1750-2000 (Athlone, 1999), Chapters 5 and 8

Beresford, P., ‘What Have Madness and Psychiatric System Survivors Got to Do with Disability and Disability Studies?’, Disability and Society, 15:1 (2000), pp.167-172.

Cox, Catherine, and Hilary Marland., ‘”A Burden on the County”: Madness, Institutions of Confinement, and the Irish Patient in Victorian Lancashire,” Social History of Medicine28 (2015), 263-287.

Digby, Anne, Madness, Morality and Medicine: A Study of the York Retreat, 1796-1914 (Cambridge University Press, 1985)

Holland, Sarah, ‘Narrating and Navigating Patient Experiences of Farm Work in English Psychiatric Institutions, 1845-1914’ in Anne Hanley and Jessica Meyer (eds.), Patient Voices in Britain, 1840-1948 (Manchester University Press, 2021), pp.125-153.

Hunter, R. and I. Macalpine, Psychiatry for the Poor: 1851 Colney Hatch Asylum – Friern Hospital 1973: A Medical and Social History (W. Dawson, 1974)

Jones, K. Asylums and After: A Revised History of the Mental Health Services: From the Early Eighteenth Century to the 1990s (Athlone, 1993)

Melling, J. and B. Forsythe (eds), Insanity, Institutions and Society: A Social History of Madness in Comparative Perspective (Routledge, 1999).

McKenzie, C., Psychiatry for the Rich: A History of Ticehurst Private Asylum, 1792-1917 (Routledge, 1992)
 

Parry-Jones, W. L., The Trade in Lunacy: A Study of Private Madhouses in England in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1972).

Phillips, G., ‘Scottish and English Institutions for the Blind, 1792-1860’, Scottish Historical Review, 198 (1995), 178-209. Also available online through JSTOR here  

Smith, L. D., ‘Cure, Comfort and Safe Custody’: Public Lunatic Asylums in Early Nineteenth-Century England (Leicester University Press, 1999)
  

Trieman, Noam and Julian Leff, ‘Closing Psychiatric Hospitals: Some Lessons from the Taps Project’ in Raymond Jack (ed.), Residential Versus Community Care: The Role of Institutions in Welfare Provision (Macmillan, 1998), pp.41-52. https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-1-349-14135-7

Reid, Fred, ‘The Panopticon: Towards an intimate history of special schools for the blind’ in Iain Hutchison, Martin Atherton and Jaipreet Virdi, eds., Disability and the Victorians: Attitudes, Interventions, Legacies (Manchester University Press, 2020), unpaginated.

Wright, D., ‘Getting out of the Asylum: Understanding the Confinement of the Insane in the Nineteenth Century’, Social History of Medicine 10:1 (1997), 137-155.

Wright, D. Mental Disability in Victorian England: The Earlswood Asylum 1847-1901 (Clarendon Press, 2001)
  

WEEK 10: Assistive Technologies

Set readings

Curtis, Ben and Steven Thompson, ‘”A plentiful Crop of Cripples Made by All This Progress”: Disability, Artificial Limbs and Working-Class Mutualism in the South Wales Coalfield, 1890-1948’, Social History of Medicine 27 (2014), 708-27. 

Feo, Katherine, ‘Invisibility: Memory, Masks and Masculinities in the Great War’, Journal of Design History 20:1 (2007), 17-28. 

Rubery, Matthew, ‘From Shell Shock to Shellac: The Great War, Blindness, and Britain’s Talking Book Library,’ Twentieth Century British History 26:1 (2015), 1-25. 

Further readings

Fallon, Cara Kiernan, ‘Walking Cane Style and Medicalized Mobility’ in Bess Williamson & Elizabeth Guffey, eds., Making Disability Modern: Design Histories (Bloomsbury, 2000),pp.43-59

Guyatt, Mary, ‘Better Legs: Artificial Limbs for British Veterans of the First World War’, Journal of Design History, 14:4 (2001), 307-326.

Jones, Claire, ‘Modern Prostheses in Anglo-American Commodity Cultures: An Introduction’ in Claire Jones (ed.), Rethinking Modern Prostheses in Anglo-American Commodity Cultures 1820-1939 (Manchester University Press), pp.1-24.

Kirkup, John, A History of Limb Amputation (Springer, 2007), 155-172.
 

Lieffers, Caroline, ‘”Happiness and usefulness increased”: Consuming ability in the antebellum artificial limb market’ in Iain Hutchison, Martin Atherton and Jaipreet Virdi, eds., Disability and the Victorians: Attitudes, Interventions, Legacies (Manchester University Press, 2020), unpaginated.

McGuire, C. A. ‘The categorisation of hearing loss through telephony in inter-war Britain’ History and Technology, 35:2 (2019), 138–155. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2019.1652435

McGuire, Coreen, Jaipreet Virdi and Jenny Hutton, ‘Respiratory technologies and the co-production of breathing in the twentieth century’ in Anne Hanley and Jessica Meyer (eds.), Patient Voices in Britain, 1840-1948 (Manchester University Press, 2021), pp.183-222.

Katherine Ott, David Serlin, and Stephen Mihn, eds., Artificial Parts, Practical Lives: Modern Histories of Prosthetics (New York University Press, 2002)
  

Sweet, Ryan, ‘Get The Best Article In The Market’: Prostheses For Women In Nineteenth-Century Literature And Commerce’ in Claire L. Jones (ed,) Rethinking Modern Prostheses in Anglo-American Commodity Cultures, 1820-1939, (Manchester University Press, 2017), pp.114-136.

Virdi, Jaipreet, "Curtis's Cephaloscope: Deafness and the Making of Surgical Authority in London, 1815-1845," Bulletin of the History of Medicine87.3 (2013): 349-379.

WEEK 11: Disability Activism

Set readings

Kudlick, Catherine J., ‘Disability History: Why We Need Another “Other”’, American Historical Review 108 (2003), 763-93.

Murray, Joseph J., ‘Transnational Interconnections in Nineteenth-Century Western Deaf Communities’ in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (Oxford University Press, 2018), unpaginated.

Sabatello, Maya, ‘A Short History of the International Disability Rights Movement’ in Maya Sabatello and Marianne Schulze, eds., Human Rights and Disability Advocacy (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014), pp.13-24

 Further readings

Brückner, Burghart, ‘Lunatics’ Rights Activism in Britain and the German Empire: A European perspective’ in Anne Hanley and Jessica Meyer (eds.), Patient Voices in Britain, 1840-1948 (Manchester University Press, 2021), pp.91-124.

Drake, R. ‘What Am I Doing Here?: “Non-Disabled” People and the Disability Movement’, Disability and Society 12 (1997), 143-144.

Dyck, Erika and Ginny Russell, ‘Challenging Psychiatric Classification: Healthy Autistic Diversity and the Neurodiversity Movement’ in Stephen J. Taylor and Alice Brumby, eds, Healthy Minds in the Twentieth Century: In and Beyond the Asylum (Springer, 2020), pp.167-187. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-27275-3_8

Hutchison, Iain, ‘Oralism: A Sign of the Times? The Contest for Deaf Communication in Education Provision in Late Nineteenth-century Scotland’, European Review of History: Revue européenne d’histoire 14:4 92007), 481-501.

Lewis, Bradley, 'A Mad Fight: Psychiatry and Disabilty Activism' in L. Davis, ed., The Disability Studies Reader Fifth Edition (Routledge, 2016), pp.102-118.

Peers, Danielle, ‘Sport and Social Movements by and for Disabled and Deaf Communities’ in Ian Brittain and Aaron Beacom, eds. The Palgrave Handbook of Paralympic Studies (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), pp.71-98.

Rée, Jonathan, I See A Voice: Language, Deafness and the Senses – A Philosophical History (HarperCollins, 1999), Chapters 20 and 21 
  

Shakespeare, Tom and Nick Watson, ‘Making the Difference: Disability, Politics and Recognition’ in Gary L. Albrecht, Katherine D. Seelman and Michael Bury, eds., Handbook of Disability Studies (Sage, 2001), pp.546-564.

Swain, J., V. Finkelstein, S. French and M. Oliver, eds., Disabling Barriers - Enabling Environments (Sage, 2013), unpaginated

WEEK 12: Body, Mind and Senses

Set readings

Gagen, Wendy Jane, ‘Remastering the Body, Renegotiating Gender: Physical Disability and Masculinity During the First World War, the Case of J. B. Middlebrook’, European Review of History: Revue européenne d’histoire 14:4 (2007), 525-541.

O’Reilly, Michelle, Jessica Nina Lester and Nikki Kiyimba, ‘Autism in the Twentieth Century: An Evolution of a Controversial Condition’ in Stephen J. Taylor and Alice Brumby, eds, Healthy Minds in the Twentieth Century: In and Beyond the Asylum (Springer, 2020), pp.137-165 https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-27275-3_7

Virdi, Jaipreet, "Prevention & Conservation: Historicizing the Stigma of Hearing Loss, 1910-1940," Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 45:4 (2017), 531-544. 

Further readings

Anderson, J., ‘“Turned into Taxpayers”: Paraplegia, Rehabilitation and Sport at Stoke Mandeville, 1944-56’, Journal of Contemporary History, 38:3 (2003), 461–475. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022009403038003007

Atkinson, D., M. Jackson and J. Walmsley (eds.) Forgotten Lives: Exploring the History of Learning Disability (British Institute of Learning Disabilities, 1997).

Bynum, Helen, Spitting Blood: The History of Tuberculosis (Oxford University Press, 2012)
 

Davis, Lennard J. Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness, and the Body (Verso, 1995)

De Veirman, Sofie. ‘Deaf and Disabled? (Un)Employment of Deaf People in Belgium: A Comparison of Eighteenth-Century and Nineteenth-Century Cohorts’, Disability & Society 30 (2015), 460-74.

Donnelly, M., Managing the Mind: A Study of Medical Psychology in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain (Tavistock, 1983)

Gould, T. A Summer Plague: Polio and Its Survivors (Yale University Press, 1995)

Grant, B. The Deaf Advance: A History of the British Deaf Association (Pentland Press, 1990) Available via the Internet Archive: https://archive.org/details/deafadvancehisto0000gran/mode/2up  

McGuire, C. “X-rays don”t tell lies’: the Medical Research Council and the measurement of respiratory disability, 1936–1945’, British Journal for the History of Science, 52:3 (2019), 447–465. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007087419000232

Mellett, D. J., ‘Bureaucracy and Mental Illness: The Commissioners in Lunacy, 1845-90’, Medical History 25:3 (1981), 221-250.

Silver, J. R., ‘Ludwig Guttmann (1899–1980), Stoke Mandeville Hospital and the Paralympic Games. Journal of Medical Biography, 20:3 (2012), 101–105. https://doi.org/10.1258/jmb.2012.012055

Watson, Nick, Alan Roulstone and Carol Thomas (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies (Routledge, 2012), Part II.

WEEK 13: Age and Life Cycle

Set readings

Curtis, Ben and Steven Thompson, ‘”This is the Country of Premature Old Men”: Ageing and Aged Miners in the South Wales Coalfield, c. 1880-1947’, Cultural and Social History, 12:4 (2015), 587-606.
 

Hutchison, Iain, ‘The Disabled Child in an Industrial Metropolis: Glasgow Children’s Hospital, Scottish convalescent homes “in the country,” and East Park Home for Infirm Children’ in Iain Hutchison, Martin Atherton and Jaipreet Virdi, eds., Disability and the Victorians: Attitudes, Interventions, Legacies (Manchester University Press, 2020), unpaginated.
 

Welshman, J., ‘Growing Old in the City: Public Health and the Elderly in Leicester, 1948-1974’, Medical History 40: 1 (1996), 74-89.

Further readings

Bigby, Christine, ‘”I Hope He Dies Before Me”: Unraveling the Debates about Aging and People with Intellectual Disability’ in Nick Watson, Alan Roultone and Carol Thomas (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies (Routledge, 2012), pp.492-506.

Blaikie, Andrew, Aging and Popular Culture (Cambridge University Press, 1999).
 

Bridgen, P. ‘Hospitals, Geriatric Medicine, and the Long-Term Care of Elderly People, 1946-1976’, Social History of Medicine 14: 3 (2001), pp.507-523.

Davis, John M., ‘Disability and Childhood: A Journey Towards Inclusion’ in J. Swain, V. Finkelstein, S. French and M. Olivers, eds., Disabling Barriers - Enabling Environments (Sage, 2013), unpaginated.

Hunt, E. H., ‘Paupers and Pensioners: Past and Present’, Ageing and Society 9:4 (1989), 407-430

Hurt, J. S. Outside the Mainstream: A History of Special Education (Batsford, 1988)

Koven, Seth, ‘Remembering and Dismemberment: Crippled Children, Wounded Soldiers and the Great War in Great Britain’, American Historical Review 99:4 (1994), 1167-1203.

Macfarlane, Anne, ‘Disability and Aging’ in J. Swain, V. Finkelstein, S. French and M. Olivers, eds., Disabling Barriers - Enabling Environments (Sage, 2013), unpaginated

Martin, M. ‘Medical Knowledge and Medical Practice: Geriatric Medicine in the 1950s’, Social History of Medicine, 8:3 (1995), 443-461

Means, R. and R. Smith, ‘From Public Assistance Instituions to “Sunshine Hotels”: Changing State Perceptions about Residential Care for Elderly People, 1939-1948’, Ageing and Society, 3:2 (1983), 157-181.

Philips, Deborah, ‘Embodied Narratives: Control, Regulation and Bodily Resistance in the Life Course of Older Women with Learning Difficulties’, European Review of History: Revue européenne d’histoire 14:4 (2007), 503-524

Shemmings, Yvonne, ‘Death and Dying in Residential Homes for Older People’ in Raymond Jack (ed.), Residential Versus Community Care: The Role of Institutions in Welfare Provision (Macmillan, 1998), pp.154-165.

Taylor, Stephen J., ‘Planning for the Future: Special Education and the Creation of “Healthy Minds”’ in Stephen J. Taylor and Alice Brumby, eds, Healthy Minds in the Twentieth Century: In and Beyond the Asylum (Springer, 2020), pp. 73-93. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-27275-3_4

Thane, Pat, Old Age in English History: Past Experiences, Present Issues (Oxford University Press, 2000)

Thomson, D., ‘Workhouse to Nursing Home: Residential Care of Elderly People in England Since 1840’, Ageing and Society, 3:1 (1983), 43-69. 

WEEK 14: Sex and Gender

Set readings

Bourke, Joanna, ‘Love and Limblessness: Male Heterosexuality, Disability and the Great War’, Journal of War & Culture Studies (2015), pp.1-17 

Cox, Pamela, ‘Girls, deficiency and delinquency’ in D. Wright and A. Digby, From Idiocy to Mental Deficiency: Historical Perspectives on People with Learning Disabilities (Routledge, 1996), pp.184-206.
 

Parker, Alison M. ‘Intersecting Histories of Gender, Race and Disability’, Journal of Women’s History 27:1 (2015), 178-186. 

Further readings

Bê, Ana, ‘Feminism and Disability: A Cartography of Multiplicity’ in Nick Watson, Alan Roultone and Carol Thomas (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies (Routledge, 2012), pp.421-435

Bonnie, Selina, ‘Disabled People, Disability and Sexuality’ in J. Swain, V. Finkelstein, S. French and M. Oliver, eds., Disabling Barriers - Enabling Environments (Sage, 2013), unpaginated.

Hide, Louise, Gender and Class in English Asylums, 1890-1914 (Palgrave Macmillam 2014)

Hunt, Xanthe, ‘Disability and Sexuality’ in Nick Watson, Alan Roultone and Carol Thomas (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies (Routledge, 2012), pp.436-452.

Loach, I. and R. Lister, Second Class Disabled: A Report on the Non-Contributory Invalidity Pension for Married Women (Equal Rights for Disabled Women Campaign, 1978)
 

Meyer, Jessica, ‘Separating the Men from the Boys: Masculinity and Maturity in Understandings of Shell Shock in Britain’, Twentieth Century British History 20:1 (2009), 1-22.

Robertson, Steve and Brett Smith, ‘Men, Masculinities and Disabilty’ in J. Swain, V. Finkelstein, S. French and M. Olivers, eds., Disabling Barriers - Enabling Environments (Sage, 2013), unpaginated

Saxton, Marsha, 'Disability Rights and Selective Abortion' in L. Davis, ed., The Disability Studies Reader. Fifth Edition (Routledge, 2016), pp.73-86.

Sheldon, Alison, ‘Women and Disability’ in J. Swain, V. Finkelstein, S. French and M. Olivers, eds., Disabling Barriers - Enabling Environments (Sage, 2013), unpaginated.

Soloway, Richard, Demography and Degeneration: Eugenics and the Declining Birthrate in Twentieth-Century Britain (University of North Carolina Press, 1995)
 

St. Pierre, Joshua, ‘Distending Straight-Masculine Time: A Phenomenology of the Disabled Speaking Body’, Hypatia 30:1 (2015), 49-65.

Virdi, Jaipreet and Coreen McGuire, ‘Phyllis M. Tookey Kerridge and the science of audiometric standardization in Britain’ The British Journal for the History of Science, 51(1) (2018), 123–146. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007087417000929

WEEK 15: Intersections with Race

Set readings

Cleal, Esme, ‘Imperial Lives: confronting the legacies of empire, disability and the Victorians’ in Iain Hutchison, Martin Atherton and Jaipreet Virdi, eds., Disability and the Victorians: Attitudes, Interventions, Legacies (Manchester University Press, 2020), unpaginated. 

Stienstra, Deborah, ‘Race/ethnicity and disability studies: towards an explicitly intersectional approach’ in Nick Watson, Alan Roultone and Carol Thomas (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies (Routledge, 2012), pp.453-466. 

Virdi, Jaipreet, ‘Materializing User Identities and Digital Humanities’ in Bess Williamson & Elizabeth Guffey, eds., Making Disability Modern: Design Histories (Bloomsbury, 2000), 225-241.

Further readings

Brunton, Warwick, ‘”At Variance with the Most Elementary Principles”: The State of British Colonial Lunatic Asylums in 1863’, History of Psychiatry 26:2 (2015), 147-165.

Cleall, Esme, ‘Deaf Connections and Global Conversations: Deafness and Education in and Beyond the British Empire, ca. 1800-1900’, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History 16:1 (2015), doi:10.1353/cch.2015.0006.

Coleborne, Catharine, ‘White Men and Weak Masculinity: Men in the Public Asylums inVictoria, Australia, and New Zealand, 1860s-1900s,’ History of Psychiatry 25 (2014), 468-476.

Ernst, Waltraud, ‘Out of sight and out of mind: insanity in early-nineteenth-century British India’ in J. Melling and B. Forsythe (eds), Insanity, Institutions and Society: A Social History of Madness in Comparative Perspective (Routledge, 1999), pp.245-267.

Garland Thomas, Rosemarie, Freakery: Cultural Spectacles of the Extraordinary Body (New York University Press, 1996), Part IV.

Grischow, Jeff, ‘Disability and Work in British West Africa’ in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick and Kim E. Nielsen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Disability Historyy (Oxford University Press, 2018), unpaginated.

Hussain, Yasmin, ‘”Race”, Ethnicity and Disability’ in J. Swain, V. Finkelstein, S. French and M. Olivers, eds., Disabling Barriers - Enabling Environments (Sage, 2013), unpaginated.

Marks, Shula, ‘”Every facility that modern science and enlightened humanity have devised”: race and progress in a colonial hospital, Valkenberg Mental Asylum, Cape Colony, 1894-1910’ in J. Melling and B. Forsythe (eds), Insanity, Institutions and Society: A Social History of Madness in Comparative Perspective (Routledge, 1999), pp.268-292.

Nair, Aparna, ‘Technologies for the Deaf in British India, 1850-1950’ in Bess Williamson & Elizabeth Guffey, eds., Making Disability Modern: Design Histories(Bloomsbury, 2000), 77-99

________. ‘”These Curly-Bearded, Olive-Skinned Warriors”: Medicine, Prosthetics, Rehabilitation and the Disabled Sepoy in the First World War, 1914-1920’, Social History of Medicine 33:3 (2019), 798-818.

WEEK 16: Communities of Care

Set readings

Borsay, Anne, ‘Returning Patients to the Community: Disability, Medicine and Economic Rationality Before the Industrial Revolution’, Disability and Society 13:5 (1998), pp.645-663.

Payne, Sarah, ‘Outside the Walls of the Asylum? Psychiatric Treatment in the 1980s and 1990s’ in P. Bartlett and D. Wright, (eds.) Outside the Walls of the Asylum: A History of Care in the Community, 1750-2000 (Athlone, 1999), 244-265.

Walmsley, J. and S. Rolph, ‘Development of Community Care for People with Learning Difficulties, 1913-1945’, Critical Social Policy, 21: 1 (2001), 59-80.

Further readings

Borsay, Anne, Disabled People in the Community: A Study of Housing, Health and Welfare Services (Bedford Square Press, 1986)
   

Brumby, Alice, ‘The National Schizophrenia Fellowship: Charity, Caregiving and Strategies of Coping, 1960-1980’ in Stephen J. Taylor and Alice Brumby, eds, Healthy Minds in the Twentieth Century: In and Beyond the Asylum (Springer, 2020), pp.189-209. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-27275-3_9

Gorsky, Martin, ‘Mutual Aid and Civil Society: Friendly Societies in Nineteenth-Century Bristol’, Urban History 25 (1998), 302-22.

Green, David G. Working-Class Patients and the Medical Establishment: Self-Help in Britain from the Mid-Nineteenth Century to 1948 (Gower, 1985).

Horden, Peregrine, ‘Household Care and Informal Networks: Comparisons and continuities from antiquity to the present’ in Peregrine Horden and Richard Smith, eds., The Locus of Care: Families, Communities, Institutions and the Provision of Welfare Since Antiquity (Routledge, 1997), 21-69.  Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Thomson, Mathew, ‘Community Care and the Control of Mental Defectives in Inter-War Britain’ in Peregrine Horden and Richard Smith, eds, The Locus of Care: Families, Communities, Institutions and the Provision of Welfare Since Antiquity (Routledge, 1997), 198-217.

________. ‘Family, community and the state: The micro-politics of mental deficiency’ in in D. Wright and A. Digby, From Idiocy to Mental Deficiency: Historical Perspectives on People with Learning Disabilities (Routledge, 1996), pp.207-230.

Wright, David, ‘”Childlike in his innocence”: Lay attitudes to “idiots” and “imbeciles” in Victorian England’ in in D. Wright and A. Digby, From Idiocy to Mental Deficiency: Historical Perspectives on People with Learning Disabilities (Routledge, 1996), pp. 118-133.

WEEK 17: Representing Disability

Set readings

Borsay, Anne, ‘Disability in British Poetry of the First World War’, Disability & Society 30:4 (2015), 499-512.

Jackson, M., ‘Images of Deviance: Visual Representations of Mental Defectives in Early Twentieth-Century Medical Texts’, British Journal for the History of Science, 28:3 (1995), 319-337.

Rawling, Katherine, ‘‘She sits all day in the attitude depicted in the photo’: photography and the psychiatric patient in the late nineteenth century’, Medical Humanities, 43:2 (2017), 99-110 

Further readings

Barker C.F. and S.F. Murray, ‘Introduction: On Reading Disability in Literature’ in C.F. Barker and S.F. Murray, eds., The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Disability , (Cambridge University Press, 2017), pp.1-16

Carden-Coyne, A., Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism, and the First World War (2009)

Esmail, Jennifer and Christopher Keep, ‘Victorian Disability: Introduction’, Victorian Review, 35:2 (2009), 45-51.

Fratz, Deborah M., ‘Disabling the Author in Mid-Victorian Realist Fiction: Case studies of George Eliot and Harriet Martineau’ in Iain Hutchison, Martin Atherton and Jaipreet Virdi, eds., Disability and the Victorians: Attitudes, Interventions, Legacies (Manchester University Press, 2020), unpaginated.

Garland Thomas, Rosemarie, ‘Introduction: From Wonder to Error – A Genealogy of Freak Discourse in Modernity’ in Rosemarie Garland Thomas (ed.), Freakery: Cultural Spectacles of the Extraordinary Body (New York University Press, 1996), pp.1-19.

Holmes, Martha Stoddard, Fictions of Affliction: Physical Disability in Victorian Culture (University of Michigan Press, 2004).

Meyer, Jessica, ‘”Not Septimus Now”: Wives of Disabled Veterans and Cultural Memory of the First World War in Britain’, Women’s History Review 13:1 (2004), 117-138.

McDonald, Kate, ‘The Woman’s Body as Compensation for the Disabled First World War Soldier’, Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies 10:1 (2016).

O’Brien, Gerald V. Framing the Moron: The Social Construction of Feeble-Mindedness in the American Eugenic Era (Manchester University Press, 2013)

Rawling, Katherine, ‘‘The Annexed Photos were Taken Today’: Photographing Patients in the Late-Nineteenth-century Asylum’, Social History of Medicine, 34:1 (2021), 256-284

Wiltshire, Imogen, ‘”(Un)healthy Minds” and Visual and Tactile Arts, c.1900-1950’ in Stephen J. Taylor and Alice Brumby, eds, Healthy Minds in the Twentieth Century: In and Beyond the Asylum (Springer, 2020), pp.211-238. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-27275-3_10

WEEK 18: The Medical Model v. The Social Model

Set readings

Barnes, Colin, ‘Understanding the Social Model of Disability: Past, Present and Future’ in Nick Watson, Alan Roultone and Carol Thomas (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies (Routledge, 2012), pp.14-31

Bone, Kirsten Marie, ‘Trapped Behind the Glass: Crip Theory and Disability Identity’, Disability & Society 32:9 (2017), 1297-1314. 

Goodley, Dan ‘Who is Disabled’ Exploring the Scope of the Social Model of Disability’ in J. Swain, V. Finkelstein, S. French and M. Olivers, eds., Disabling Barriers - Enabling Environments (Sage, 2013), unpaginated.

Further readings

Goodley, D. ‘Dis/entangling critical disability studies’, Disability and Society28:5 (2013), 631-644.

Goodley, D., R. Lawthom and C.K. Runswick, ‘Posthuman disability studies’, Subjectivity, 7 (2014), 342-361. https://doi.org/10.1057/sub.2014.15

Marks, Deborah, Disability: Controversial Debates and Psychosocial Perspectives (Routledge, 1999), pp.77-94.
 I 

Meekosha, H. and R. Shuttleworth, ‘What’s so “critical” about critical disability studies?’, Australian Journal of Human Rights 15:1 (2009), 47-76.

Oliver, Michael, and Colin Barnes, The New Politics of Disablement (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).

Rembis, Michael, ‘Challenging the Impairment/Disability Divide: Disability History and the Social Model of Disability’ in Nick Watson, Alan Roultone and Carol Thomas (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies (Routledge, 2012), pp.377-390.

Siebers, T., ‘Disability in theory: From social constructionism to the new realism of the body’ in L. Davis, ed., The Disability Studies Reader. Fifth Edition (Routledge, 2016), pp.313-332.

Smith, Brett and Andrea Bundon, ‘Disability Models: Explaining and Understanding Sport in Different Ways’ in Ian Britten an Aaron Beacom, eds., The Palgrave Handbook of Paralympic Studies (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), pp.15-34.

Tregaskis, C. ‘Social Model Theory: The Story So Far’, Disability and Society 17:4 (2002), 457-470

WEEK 19: Patient Voices

Set readings

Bredburg, Elizabeth, ‘Writing Disability History: Problems, perspectives and sources’, Disability & Society 14:2 (1999), 189-201. 

Kudlick, Catherine, ‘Social History of Medicine and Disability History’ in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (Oxford University Press, 2018), unpaginated.

Further readings

Carter, Paul and Steve King, ‘The Patient’s View as History from Below: Evidence from the Victorian poor, 1834-71 in Anne Hanley and Jessica Meyer (eds.), Patient Voices in Britain, 1840-1948 (Manchester University Press, 2021), pp.154-180

Davies, Kerry, ‘”Silent and Censured Travellers”? Patients’ Narratives and Patients’ Voices: Perspectives on the History of Mental Illness Since 1948’, Social History of Medicine 14:2 (2001), 267-292.

Hirsch, Jerrold and Karen Hirsch, ‘Disability in the Family?: New Questions About the Southern Mill Village’, Journal of Social History, 35:4 (2002), 919-33.

King, S.A. and P. Jones, ‘Fragments of Fury? Lunacy, Agency and Contestation in the Great Yarmouth Workhouse, 1890s-1900s’, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 52:2 (2020), 235-265

WEEK 20: Material Histories

Set readings

Gleeson, B., ‘Disability Studies: A Historical Materialist View’, Disability and Society 12:2 (1997), 179-202.

Ott, Katherine, ‘Material Culture, Technology and the Body in Disability History’ in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (Oxford University Press, 2018), unpaginated.

Further readings

Abberley, P. ‘Disabled people and “normality”’ in J. Swain et al., eds., Disabling Barriers – Enabling Environments (Sage, 1993), unpaginated.

Burch, Susan, ‘Access as Practice: Disability, Accessible Design, and History’, Reviews in American History 48:4 (2020), 618-624.

Gleeson, Brendon J. Geographies of Disability (Routledge, 1999), pp.99-126.

Guffey, Elizabeth and Bess Williamson, ‘Introduction: Rethinking Design History through Disability, Rethinking Disability through Design’ in Bess Williamson and Elizabeth Guffey, eds., Making Disability Modern: Design Histories (Bloomsbury, 2020), 1-17.

Leneman, Leah, ‘Lives and Limbs: Company Records as a Source for the History of Industrial Injury’, Social History of Medicine, 6:3 (1993), 405-27.

Williamson, Bess, ‘Designing Objects and Spaces: A Modern Disability History’ in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (Oxford University Press, 2018), unpaginated

WEEK 21: The Ethics of Doing Disability Histories

Set readings

Meyer, Jessica and Alexia Moncrieff, ‘Family Not to Be Informed? The ethical use of historical medical documentation’ in Anne Hanley and Jessica Meyer (eds.), Patient Voices in Britain, 1840-1948 (Manchester University Press, 2021), pp.61-87. (9781526154880)
 
   Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Richards, Penny and Susan Burch, ‘Documents, Ethics, and the Disability Historian’ in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (Oxford University Press, 2018), unpaginated.

Further readings

Carlson, Elof Axel, The Unfit: A history of a bad idea (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 2001).

De Baets, A., Responsible History (New York: Berghahn Books, 2008), Chapter 6.

Rembis, Michael, ‘Disability and the History of Eugenics’ in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (Oxford University Press, 2018), unpaginated

Richardson, J.C. and B.S. Godfrey, ‘Towards ethical practice in the use of archived transcripted interviews,International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 6:4, 347-355

Sangha, L., ‘The Living, the Dead and the Very, Very Dead’, Storying the Past, 22nd May, 2018, https://storyingthepast.wordpress.com/2018/05/22/the-living-the-dead-and-the-very-very-dead-ethics-for-historians-by-laura-sangha/.

Scates, B., ‘How War Came Home: Reflections on the Digitisation of Australia’s Repatriation Files’, History Australia, vol. 16, no. 1.

This list was last updated on 14/09/2021