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GEOG2062
GEOG 2062 Reading List Weeks 1-5

Sustainability: Living Within Limits, 2021/22, Semester 1, 2
Prof Jon Lovett
j.lovett@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

School of Geography 2021/22 Level 2, Semester 1

University of Leeds Dr Alan Grainger

GEOG 2062 LIVING WITHIN LIMITS

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Reading List for Dr Alan Grainger’s Lectures in Weeks 1-5

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INTRODUCTION

This course of lectures provides an introduction to human-environment geography and the insights it offers into the challenges of living within planetary limits. It covers both the basic principles of human-environment geography and recent innovations.

It first introduces the main types of human environment relationships, and the difficulties of controlling these by government policies. It then contrasts biophysical and economic approaches to evaluating natural resource scarcity, and closes by exploring different political and economic approaches to integrating the environment  and development to achieve "sustainable development".

This Reading List contains a list of the classic research publications which are referred to in lectures, as well as recent perspectives on these. It is intended to meet the needs of students who are unable to visit the Library in person in present conditions. For each lecture Core Reading is suggested, based on material which is available online.  Human-environment geography suffers from a lack of overview textbooks, and since many of those that are published are only available on library shelves, and not online,  the classic research publications which are listed in these books are listed here too, together with appropriate overviews in journal papers where are these are available. Overview books that would normally be recommended are retained, but if these are only available on Library shelves, and not online, this is indicated. Core reading includes two unpublished texts written especially for these lectures, "Grainger 1" and "Grainger 2", which can be downloaded from Minerva.

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CORE TEXTS

Grainger 1. Grainger A., 2001. Managing the Environment. School of Geography, University of Leeds, Leeds. (Available in Grainger Readings on Minerva).

Grainger 2. Grainger A., 2003. Natural Resources for Sustainable Development. School of Geography, University of Leeds, Leeds. (Available in Grainger Readings on Minerva).

Castree N., Demeritt D., Liverman D. and Rhoads B., 2009. A Companion to Environmental Geography. Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester. (Available online via the Library Catalogue).

Perman R., Ma Y., Common M., Maddison D.  and McGilvray J., 2011. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics. 4th Edn. Longman, Harlow. (Available online via the Library Catalogue).

Purvis M. and Grainger A. (eds.), 2004. Exploring Sustainable Development: Geographical Perspectives. Earthscan Publications, London. (Available online via the Library Catalogue).

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LECTURE 1: INTRODUCTION

This lecture introduces the basic concepts used in the course, the 'environmental revolution' of the 1960s which began this new era of human endeavour, and relevant papers on human geography, physical geography and human-environment geography.

Core Reading

Grainger 1, pp 5-23.

Grainger 2, pp 27-30.

Purvis, Ch 1, pp 18-20.

Castree, pp 1-15, 385-399.

Pearce D.W and Turner R.K., 1990. Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment. Harvester Wheatsheaf, London, pp 29-42. (Available through Library Core Reading).

Economic Growth & Economic Development

Sloman J., Guest J., Garratt D. and Wride A., 2018. Economics. 10th Edn. Pearson, London, pp 445-446, 716-718, 838-844. (Available online via the Library Catalogue).

The Environmental Critique of Economic Growth: Classic Texts

Boulding K., 1966. The economics of the coming spaceship earth. In Jarrett H. (ed.) 1966. Environmental Quality in a Growing Economy: 3-14. Resources for the Future, Washington DC. (Download through Google).

Carson R., 1962. Silent Spring. Houghton Mifflin, Boston. (Download through Google).

Ehrlich P.R., 1968. The Population Bomb. Ballantine Books, New York. (Download through Google).

Hardin G., 1968. The tragedy of the commons. Science 162: 1243-1248.

Mishan E., 1967. The Costs of Economic Growth. Penguin, London. (Not available online).

Reappraisals of the Environmental Critique of Economic Growth

Collins P., 2002. Population growth the scapegoat? Rethinking the Neo-Malthusian debate. Energy and Environment 13: 401-422.

Ehrlich P.R. and Ehrlich A., 2009. The population bomb revisited. Electronic Journal of Sustainable Development 1(3).  

Daly H.E., 2008. Growth and development: critique of a credo. Population and Development Review 34: 511-518.

Ostrom E.,Burger J., Field C.B.,Norgaard R.B. and Policansky D., 1999. Revisiting the commons: local lessons, global challenges. Science 284: 278-282.

Classic Reviews of the Limitations of Human Geography and Physical Geography

Kates R.W., 1987. The human environment: the road not taken, the road still beckoning. Annals of the Association of American Geographers  77: 525-534.

Nir D., 1990. Region as a Socio-Environmental System. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht. (Not available online).

Simmons I.G., 1990. No rush to grow green? Area 22: 384-387. Available online here.

Stoddart D.R., 1987. To claim the high ground: geography for the end of the century.Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 12: 327-336.

Taylor J.A., 1984. Biogeography. Progress in Physical Geography 8: 94-101.

Models of the Human-Environment Interface 

Black Box model:

Purvis, Ch 1, pp 18-20.

Pearce D.W and Turner R.K., 1990. Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment. Harvester Wheatsheaf, London, pp 29-42. (Available through Library Core Reading).

Ecosystem model:

Stoddart D.R., 1965. Geography and the ecological approach. Geography   50: 242-51;

Daly H.E., 1990. Operational principles of sustainable development. Ecological Economics 2: 1-6.

Recent Perspectives on Human-Environment Geography

Harden C.P., 2012. Framing and reframing questions of human–environment interactions. Annals of the Association of American Geographers  102: 737-747.

Malanson G.P., 2014. Physical geography on the methodological fence: David Stoddart (1965), Geography and the ecological approach: the ecosystem as a geographic principle and method. Progress in Physical Geography 38: 251 -258.

Moran E.F. and Lopez M.C., 2016. Future directions in human-environment research. Environmental Research 144: 1–7.

Rasmussen K. and Arler F., 2010. Interdisciplinarity at the human-environment interface. Danish Journal of Geography 110:3745.

Simon G.L. and Graybill J.K., 2010. Geography in interdisciplinarity: towards a third conversation. Geoforum 41: 356–363.

Zimmerer K.S., 2010. Retrospective on nature–society geography: tracing trajectories (1911–2010) and reflecting on translations, Annals of the Association of American Geographers 100:1076-1094.

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LECTURE 2. LIMITS IN HUMAN-ENVIRONMENT RELATIONSHIPS

This lecture shows how all human impacts on the environment, and environmental impacts on humanity, can be analysed in a generic way through a compact taxonomy of human environment relationships. It also highlights the existence of limits in these relationships which have been shown by recent research.

Core Reading

Grainger 1, pp 51-67, 71-72, 74-90.

Castree, pp 109-122, 168-180, 253-265, 461-474.

Montz B. and Tobin G.A., 2011. Natural hazards: an evolving tradition in applied geography. Applied Geography 31: 1-4.

Pearce D. and Turner R. K., 1990. Economics of Natural Resources and Environment. Harvester, London: 61-62. (Available through Library Core Reading).

Flooding

Cohen M., 2006. The roots of sustainability science: a tribute to Gilbert F. White. Sustainability: Science, Practice and Policy 2(2):1-3.

Kates R.W., Colten C.E., Laska S. and Leatherman S.P., 2006. Reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: a research perspective. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 103: 14653-14660.  

Kates R.W. and Burton I., 2008. Gilbert F. White, 1911–2006: local legacies, national achievements, and global visions. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 98: 479-486.

White G.F., 1974. Natural Hazards: Local, National, Global. Oxford University Press, Oxford. (Not available online).

Burton I., Kates R. and White G.F., 1993. The Environment as Hazard. 2nd edn. Guilford Press, New York. (Not available online).

Mitchell B., 1989. Geography and Resource Analysis. 2nd Edn. Longman, Harlow, pp 176-181. (Not available online).

Short Term Forest Area Change

Grainger A., 1993. Controlling Tropical Deforestation. Earthscan Publications, London, pp. 104-110. (Available online via the Library Catalogue).

Lambin E.F., 1997. Modelling and monitoring land-cover change processes in tropical regions. Progress in Physical Geography 21: 375-393.  

Long Term Forest Area Change

Mather A.S., 1992. The forest transition. Area 30: 117-124. Available online here

Grainger A., 1995. The forest transition: an alternative approach. Area  27: 242-251. Available online here

Barbier E.B., Burgess J.C. and Grainger A., 2010. The forest transition: towards a more comprehensive theoretical framework. Land Use Policy 27: 98–107.

Atmospheric Pollution and Global Climate Change

Selden T.M. and Song, D., 1994. Environmental quality and development: is there a Kuznets curve for air pollution emissions? Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 27: 147-162.

Stern D.I., Common M.S. and Barbier E.B., 1996. Economic growth and environmental degradation: the Environmental Kuznets Curve and sustainable development. World Development 24: 1151-l160.

Itkonen J.V.A., 2012. Problems estimating the carbon Kuznets curve. Energy 39: 274-280.

Apergis N. and Ozturk I., 2015. Testing Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis in Asian countries. Ecological Indicators 52: 16–22.

Stern D. I., 2017.The environmental Kuznets curve after 25 years. Journal of Bioeconomics 19:7–28.

External Costs of Pollution

Pearce D. and Turner R. K., 1990. Economics of Natural Resources and Environment. Harvester, London: 61-62. (Available through Library Core Reading).

Rees J., 1990. Natural Resources. Allocation, Economics and Policy. 2nd Edn. Routledge, London, pp 268-272. (Not available online).

Ecological Modernization

Anderson M.S. and Massa I., 2000. Ecological modernization: origins, dilemmas and future directions. Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning 2: 337-345. (Critical appraisal).

Buttel F.H., 2000.Ecological modernization as social theory. Geoforum 31:57-65.

Gibbs D., 2000. Ecological modernization, regional economic development and regional development agencies Geoforum 31: 9-19. (Compares it with sustainable development).

Murphy J., 2000. Ecological modernization. Geoforum 31: 1-8.

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LECTURE 3. LIMITS IN THE POLICY PROCESS

This lecture shows how repeated human activities (or "institutions"), which are crucial to damaging the environment but also managing it sustainably, and so determine whether human-environment relationships are controlled, are influenced by government policies and market forces. It also shows how academics explain how policy is formulated and implemented, and whether this is effective or ineffective.

Core Reading

Grainger 1, 132-152, 125-127.

Purvis, Ch 12, pp 281-284.

The Role of Institutions

Crawford S. E. S. and Ostrom E., 1995. A grammar of institutions. American Political Science Review 89: 582-600.

Hall P.A., and Taylor R.C.R., 1996. Political science and the three new institutionalisms. Political Studies 44: 936-957.  

Ostrom E., 2011. Background on the Institutional Analysis and Development Framework. Policy Studies Journal 39:7-27.

Policy Process

Rose R., 1973. Comparing public policy: an overview. European Journal of Political Research 1: 67-94.

Policy and Politics

Policy defined:

Jordan A. and O'Riordan T., 2014. Environmental politics and policy processes. In O'Riordan T. (ed.). Environmental Science for Environmental Management. Pearson, London, pp 63-92. (Available online via the Library Catalogue).

Stated and actual policies:

Rees J., 1990. Natural Resources. Allocation, Economics and Policy. 2nd Edn. Routledge, London, pp 413-418. (Not available online).

Interest Groups

Jordan A. and O'Riordan T., 2014. Environmental politics and policy processes. In O'Riordan T. (ed.). Environmental Science for Environmental Management. Pearson, London, pp 63-92. (Available online via the Library Catalogue).

Kasperson R.E., 1969. Environmental stress and the municipal political system. In Kasperson R.E and Minghi J.E. (eds.), The Structure of Political Geography: 481-496. University of London Press, London. (Not available online).

Hodge T., 1997. Toward a conceptual framework for assessing progress toward sustainability. Social Indicators Research 40: 5–98. (Reviews Kasperson's environmental stress model).

Classic Papers on Regulatory Environmental Policy Models for Elitist/Pluralist Societies

Simon H.A., 1955. A behavioral model of rational choice. Quarterly Journal of Economics 69: 99–118.

Lindblom C.E., 1959. The science of "muddling through". Public Administration Review 19: 79-88.

Mitchell B., 1989. Geography and Resource Analysis. 2nd Edn. Longman, Harlow, Ch 12. (Not available online).

Rees J., 1990. Natural Resources. Allocation, Economics and Policy. 2nd Edn. Routledge, London, pp 397-413. (Not available online).

Reappraisals of Regulatory Environmental Policy Models for Elitist/Pluralist Societies

Forester J., 1984. Bounded rationality and the politics of muddling through. Public Administration Review 44: 23-31.

Gunnell J.G., 1996. The genealogy of American pluralism: from Madison to Behavioralism. International Political Science Review 17: 253-265. (Good overview of Bentley's political bargaining model.)

Simon H.A., 1991. Bounded rationality and organizational learning. Organization Science 2: 125-134.

Recent Regulatory Environmental Policy Models for Mixed Societies

Elliott C. and Schlaepfer R., 2001. Understanding forest certification using the Advocacy Coalition Framework. Forest Policy and Economics 2: 257-266.

Szarka J., 2004. Wind power, discourse coalitions and climate change: breaking the stalemate? European Environment 14: 317-330.

Studies of Market-Based Environmental Policies for Controlling Atmospheric Pollution

Ervine K., 2018. How low can it go? Analysing the political economy of carbon market design and low carbon prices. New Political Economy 23: 690-710.

Hansjürgens B., 1998. The sulfur dioxide allowance-trading program in the USA: recent developments and lessons to be learned. Environment and Planning C 16S: 341-361. Available online here

Zhong Xiang Z., 2000. The design and implementation of an international trading scheme for greenhouse gas emissions. Environment and Planning C 18: 321-337.

The Implementation Problem

Saetren H., 2014. Implementation research: an empirical assessment. Implementing the third generation research paradigm in policy. Public Policy and Administration 29: 84-105.

Schofield J., 2001. Time for a revival? Public policy implementation: a review of the literature and an agenda for future research. International Journal of Management Reviews 3: 245-263.

Overviews of Classic Models of International Relations

Purvis, Ch 12, pp 281-284.

Mearsheimer J.J., 1994.The false promise of international institutions. International Security 19: 5-49.

Powell R., 1994. Anarchy in international relations theory: The neorealist-neoliberal debate. International Organization 48: 313-344.

Dunne T., Kurki M. and Smith S., 2013. International Relations Theories. 4th Edn. Oxford University Press, Oxford. (Not available online).

Recent International Relations Models and  Global Climate Change Policy

Bulkeley H., 2000. Discourse coalitions and the Australian climate change policy network. Environment and Planning C 18: 727-748.

Demeritt D., 2001. The construction of global warming and the politics of science. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 91: 307-337.

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LECTURE 4. THE LIMITS TO INTEGRATING ENVIRONMENT AND ECONOMY

This lecture compares the consequences of taking account of market controls on human-environment relationships or ignoring them. It introduces the Limits to Growth study: the first systematic global attempt to transcend critiques of economic growth and economic development by a computer model of their impacts on natural resources and the environment. It then contrasts the biophysical approach of this model with critiques by economists of the model's assumptions and approaches used by economists to evaluate natural resource scarcity.

Core Reading

Grainger 2, pp 4-23.

Perman, Ch 2 (Section 2.4, depending on the book edition) and Ch 15.

Sloman J., Guest J., Garratt D. and Wride A., 2018. Economics. 10th Edn. Pearson, London, pp. 34-56. (Available online via the Library Catalogue).

Beckerman W., 1992. Economic growth and the environment: Whose growth? Whose environment? World Development 20: 481-496.

Turner G.M., 2008. A comparison of The Limits to Growth with 30 years of reality. Global Environmental Change 18: 397–411.

Classic Publications on The Limits to Growth 

Meadows D.H., Meadows D.L. and Randers K., 1972. The Limits to Growth. Earth Island Books, New York. Available online at:http://donellameadows.org/the-limits-to-growth-now-available-to-read-online/. (Sequels in 1992 and 2004 confirm the original simulations.)

Forrester J.W., 1995. The beginning of system dynamics. McKinsey Quarterly 1995 (4): 4-16.

Janstch E., 1971. World dynamics. Futures 3: 162-169.

Classic Criticisms of The Limits to Growth

Boyd R., 1972. World dynamics: a note. Science 177: 516-519.

Cole H. S. D., 1973. Thinking About The Future : A Critique Of The Limits To Growth. Chatto and Windus for Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex, Brighton. (Not available online).

Mikesell R.F., 1995. The limits to growth. Resources Policy 21: 127-131.

Simon J., 1981. The Ultimate Resource. Princeton University Press, Princeton. (Not available online).

Retrospectives on The Limits to Growth

Aligică P.D., 2009. Julian Simon and the "Limits to Growth" Neo-Malthusianism. Electronic Journal of Sustainable Development 1(3).  

Cole M.A., 1999. Limits to growth, sustainable development and environmental Kuznets curves: an examination of the environmental impact of economic development. Sustainable Development 7: 87–97.

Eastin J., Grundmann R. and Prakash A., 2011. The two limits debates: ‘‘Limits to Growth’’ and Climate Change. Futures 43: 16-26. (Also refers to sustainable development).

Gardner T., 2003. Limits to Growth? - a perspective on the perpetual debate. Environmental Sciences 1:121-138.  

Meadows D.H. and Meadows D.L., 2007. The history and conclusions of The Limits to Growth. System Dynamics Review 23: 191–197.

Mather A.S. and Chapman K., 1995. Environmental Resources. Longman, Harlow, pp 232-240. (Not available online).

Classic Economic Evaluations of Resource Scarcity

Barnett H.J. and Morse C., 1963. Scarcity and Growth: The Economics of Natural Resources Availability. Resources for the Future/Johns Hopkins Press (not in University Library).  

Summaries of the Barnett and Morse study:

Barnett H.J., 1979. Scarcity and Growth revisited. In Smith V. K., 1979. Scarcity and Growth Reconsidered. Resources for the Future, pp. 163-212. Download through Google Scholar at H.Barnett opac.lib.idu.ac.id.

Fisher A., 1981. Resource and Environmental Economics: 100-107. Cambridge University Press (the best summary, but not available online).

Mather A.S. and Chapman K., 1995. Environmental Resources. Longman, Harlow, pp 231-232. (Not available online).

Economic Evaluations of Long-Term Trends in Resources, Reserves and Production

Mudd G.M. and Jowitt S.M., 2018.Growing global copper resources, reserves and production: discovery is not the only control on supply. Economic Geology 113:1235-1267.

Tilton J., 2003. On Borrowed Time? Assessing the Threat of Mineral Depletion. Resources for the Future. (Available online via the Library Catalogue).

Tilton J. and Lagos G., 2007. Assessing the long run availability of copper. Resources Policy 32:19-23.

Economic Methods for Natural Resource Appraisal

Original description of the McKelvey Box model:

Falkie T.V. and McKelvey J.E., 1975. Principles of the mineral resource classification system of the US. Bureau of Mines and US Geological Survey. USGS Bulletin 1450A.  

Overviews of the McKelvey Box model:

Backman C.M., 2008. Global supply and demand of metals in the future. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health 71: 1244-1253.

Mather A.S. and Chapman K., 1995. Environmental Resources. Longman, Harlow, pp 163-170. (Not available online).

Applications of the McKelvey Box model:

McGlade C., Speirs J. and Sorrell S., 2013. Unconventional gas–a review of regional and global resource estimates. Energy 55: 571-584 (shale gas).

Rogner H.H., 1997. An assessment of world hydrocarbon resources. Annual Review of Energy and the Environment 22: 217-262.

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LECTURE 5. THE LIMITS TO INTEGRATING ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT A

This lecture shows how in the 1980s a "middle way" was sought between environmental conservation and unrestrained economic growth or development. Called "sustainable development", this concept originated in the political sphere of the United Nations, and was developed further by UN and other intergovernmental organisations, as well as by governments, together with sets of indicators to determine if development is sustainable. In parallel to this "political process" of sustainable development, whose latest initiative is the 2015 set of Sustainable Development Goals, a "scientific process" also emerged, led by two new branches of economics - ecological economics (introduced in this lecture) and environmental economics (introduced in the next lecture). The ecological economics approach, based on the ecosystem model outlined in Lecture 1, proposes that humanity should stay within the crucial limit of ultimate carrying capacity if it is to be sustainable.

Core Reading

Grainger 2, pp 27-35.

Pearce D. and Barbier E.B., 2000. Blueprint for a Sustainable Economy. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 2. Available through Library Core Reading).

Perman, Chs 1 and 2.

Purvis, Ch 1, pp 1-22; Ch 12,  284-301.

Stafford-Smith M., 2017. Integration: the key to implementing the Sustainable Development Goals. Sustainability Science 12: 911–919.

Alternative Perspectives on Sustainable Development

Williams C.C. and Millington A.C., 2004. The diverse and contested meanings of sustainable development. Geographical Journal 170: 99-104.

Applying the Political Process Approach at Regional, National and Local Scales

Bruff G.E. and Wood A.P., 2000. Making sense of sustainable development: politicians, professionals, and policies in local planning. Environment and Planning C 18: 593-607 (local scale).

DEFRA, 2013. Sustainable Development Indicators. UK Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, London.  

DOE, 1996. Indicators of Sustainable Development. UK Department of Environment, London.  

O'Riordan T., 2004. Environmental science, sustainability and politics. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers NS 29: 234-247 (multiple scales).

Rinne J., Lyytimaki J. and Kautto P., 2013. From sustainability to well-being: Lessons learned from the use of sustainable development indicators at national and EU level. Ecological Indicators 35: 35-42.

Lyytimaki J. et al., 2013. The use, non-use and misuse of indicators in sustainability assessment and communication. International Journal of Sustainable Development 20: 385-392.

The 2015 Sustainable Development Goals

Griggs D. et al., 2013. Sustainable development goals for people and planet. Nature  495: 305-307.

Hajer M. et al., 2015. Beyond cockpitism: four insights to enhance the transformative potential of the Sustainable Development Goals. Sustainability 7: 1651-1660.

Hák T. et al., 2016. Sustainable Development Goals: A need for relevant indicators. Ecological Indicators 60: 565–573.

Nilsson N., Griggs D. and Visbeck M., 2016. Map the interactions between Sustainable Development Goals. Nature 534: 320-322.

Sachs J.D., 2012. From Millennium Development Goals to Sustainable Development Goals. Lancet 379: 2206–2211.

Stafford-Smith M., 2017. Integration: the key to implementing the Sustainable Development Goals. Sustainability Science 12: 911–919.

Retrospectives on Sustainable Development

Ali S. et al., 2017. Mineral supply for sustainable development requires resource governance. Nature 543: 36 7-372.

Berke P. and Conroy M.M., 2000. Are we planning for sustainable development? Journal of the American Planning Association 66: 21-33.

Bertinelli L. et al., 2012. Sustainable economic development and the environment: theory and evidence. Energy Economics 34: 1105–1114.

Holden E. et al., 2014. Sustainable development: Our Common Future revisited. Global Environmental Change 26: 130–139. 

Murphy K., 2012. The social pillar of sustainable development: a literature review and framework for policy analysis. Sustainability: Science, Practice and Policy 8: 15-29.

Pesqueux Y., 2009. Sustainable development: a vague and ambiguous “theory”. Society and Business Review 4 :231-245.

Waas T. et al., 2014. Sustainability assessment and indicators: tools in a decision-making strategy for sustainable development. Sustainability 6: 5512-5534.

Ecological Economics Theory

Conditions for sustainable development:

Daly H.E., 1990. Operational principles of sustainable development. Ecological Economics 2: 1-6.

Daly H.E., 1990. Sustainable development: from concept and theory to operational principles. Population and Development Review 16: 25-43.

Evaluations of ecological economics:

Pearce D. and Barbier E.B., 2000. Blueprint for a Sustainable Economy. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 2. (Available through Library Core Reading). Also Ch 10. (This is not available through Library Core Reading).

Perman, Ch 1 (Section 1.2.4, depending on the book edition).

Purvis Ch 1, pp 16-18.

Green Gross Domestic Product and Related Indices

Pearce D. and Barbier E.B., 2000. Blueprint for a Sustainable Economy. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 4. (Not available through Library Core Reading).

Daly H. and Cobb J., 1989. For the Common Good. Beacon Press, Boston.

Lawn P. 2003. A theoretical foundation to support the Index of Sustainable Economic Welfare (ISEW), Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI), and other related indexes. Ecological Economics 44: 105-118.

Li V, Lang G. 2010. China's “Green GDP” experiment and the struggle for ecological modernization. Journal of Contemporary Asia 40: 44-62.

Repetto R., Wells M., Beer C. and Rossini F., 1987. Natural Resource Accounting for Indonesia. World Resources Institute, Washington DC.  

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LECTURE 6. THE LIMITS TO INTEGRATING ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT B

This lecture introduces the environmental economics model of sustainable development, and indices derived from it and the ecological economics model to measure the sustainability of development. The ecological economics model, framed by the black box model outlined in Lecture 1, proposes that if humanity is to be sustainable its activities should stay within the limits imposed by the need to keep total capital constant. The lecture ends by discussing the most recent limit on human impacts: carbon neutrality.

Core Reading

Purvis, Ch 1, pp 1-22.

Perman, Ch 4.

Pearce D.W., Markandya A. and Barbier E.B., 1989. Blueprint for a Green Economy. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 2. Available through Library Core Reading).

Pearce D., 1993. Blueprint 3. Measuring Sustainable Development. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 2. Available through Library Core Reading).

Pearce D. and Barbier E.B., 2000. Blueprint for a Sustainable Economy. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 2. Available through Library Core Reading).

Linear and circular economic models

Pearce D. and Turner R. K., 1990. Economics of Natural Resources and Environment. Harvester, London: 61-62. (Available through Library Core Reading).

Pearce D.W., Markandya A. and Barbier E.B., 1989. Blueprint for a Green Economy. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 2.

Keynes J.M., 1936. The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money. Macmillan.

Environmental Economics Definition and Constant Capital Conditions

Overviews

Pearce D.W., Markandya A. and Barbier E.B., 1989. Blueprint for a Green Economy. Earthscan Publications, Ch 2. Available through Library Core Reading).

Pearce D., 1993. Blueprint 3. Measuring Sustainable Development. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 2. Available through Library Core Reading).

Pearce D. and Barbier E.B., 2000. Blueprint for a Sustainable Economy. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 2. Available through Library Core Reading).

Purvis, Ch 1.

Origin of the Very Weak Condition in the Hartwick-Solow Rule

Solow R., 1993. An almost practical step toward sustainability. Resources Policy 19:162-172.

Perman, Ch 4.

Environmental Economics Index of Sustainable Development: Genuine Savings Index

Pearce D.W. and Atkinson G.D., 1993. Capital theory and the measurement of sustainable development: an indicator of “weak” sustainability. Ecological Economics 8: 103- 108.

Pearce D. and Barbier E.B., 2000. Blueprint for a Sustainable Economy. Earthscan Publications, London, Ch 4. (Not available through Library Core Reading).

Hess P., 2010. Determinants of the adjusted net saving rate in developing economies. International Review of Applied Economics 24: 591-608.

Gnègnè Y., 2009. Adjusted net saving and welfare change. Ecological Economics 68: 1127–1139.

Victor P.A., 1991. Indicators of sustainable development: some lessons from capital theory. Ecological Economics 4: 191-213.

Applying Constant Capital Conditions to Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources

Mikesell R.F., 1994. Sustainable development and mineral resources. Resources Policy 20: 83-86.

Naidoo R., 2004. Economic growth and liquidation of natural capital: the case of forest clearance. Land Economics 80: 194-208.

Sabour S.A.A., 2005. Quantifying the external cost of oil consumption within the context of  sustainable development. Energy Policy 33:809-813.

Ecological Economics Index of Sustainable Development: Ecological Footprint

Costanza R., 2000. The dynamics of the ecological footprint concept. Ecological Economics 32: 341–345.

Ayres R.U., 2000. Commentary on the utility of the ecological footprint. Ecological Economics 32: 347–349.

Fiala N., 2008. Measuring sustainability: Why the ecological footprint is bad economics and bad environmental science. Ecological Economics 67: 519-525.

Galli A. et al., 2016. Questioning the Ecological Footprint. Ecological Indicators 69: 224–232.

Lenzen M. and Murray S.A., 2001. A modified ecological footprint method and its application to Australia. Ecological Economics 37: 229–255.

Moffatt I., 2000. Ecological footprints and sustainable development. Ecological Economics 32: 359–362.

Rees W., 1992. Ecological footprints and appropriated carrying capacity: what urban economics leaves out. Environment and Urbanization 4: 121-130.

Van den Bergh J. C. J. M. and Verbruggen H., 1999. Spatial sustainability, trade and indicators: An evaluation of the 'ecological footprint'. Ecological Economics 29: 61-72.

Wackernagel M. and Rees W.E., 1997. Perceptual and structural barriers to investing in natural capital: Economics from an ecological footprint perspective. Ecological Economics 20: 3-24.

Wackernagel M. et al., 1999. National natural capital accounting with the ecological footprint concept. Ecological Economics 29: 375–390.

Wackernagel M., et al., 2004. Calculating national and global ecological footprint time series: resolving conceptual challenges. Land Use Policy 21: 271–278.

The Latest Limit: Carbon Neutrality

Grainger A. and Smith G., 2021. The role of low carbon and high carbon materials in carbon neutrality science and carbon economics. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 49: 164-189.

Mancinia M.S. et al., 2016. Refining the carbon footprint calculation. Ecological Indicators 61: 390–403.

This list was last updated on 03/09/2021