Skip to main content

PIED3342
Module Reading List

Gender and Security in Global Politics, 2021/22, Semester 2
Dr Sahla Aroussi
s.aroussi@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

For each week pick 2 texts from the required reading list and one text from the additional reading list

Week One: Lecture: Women’s rights in Global Context

 Required reading:

Additional Reading

Week 2: Towards Emancipatory Approaches to Women’s rights

Required reading:

Additional readings

  • Balibar, E. 1989. Racism as Universalism. New Political Science 8(1–2): 9–22.
  • Bronwyn W. 2006. Religion, culture, and women's human rights: Some general political and theoretical considerations. Women's Studies International Forum. 29, pp. 381–393.
  • Clement, V. 2019. Beyond the sham of the emancipatory Enlightenment: Rethinking the relationship of Indigenous epistemologies, knowledges, and geography through decolonizing paths. Progress in Human Geography. Vol 43(2): 276-294.
  • Donnelly, J. 1984. Cultural relativism and universal human rights. Human Rights Quarterly. Vol 6(4), pp. 400-419.
  • Guimei, B. 2019. Women's Rights are Human Rights: A Response to Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin from a Chinese Perspective. In:  Fassbender, B. and Knut, T. (eds.) The Limits of Human Rights.Oxford: OUP, pp. 223-229.
  • Grewal, I. 1999. Women's rights as human rights’: Feminist practices, global feminism, and human rights regimes in transnationality. Citizenship Studies. Vol 3(3), pp. 337-354.
  • Knuckey, S., Hoffman, B., Perelman, J., Reddy, G., Ancheita, A., & Jain, M. 2020. Power in Human Rights Advocate and Rightsholder Relationships: Critiques, Reforms, and Challenges. Harvard Human Rights Journal. Vol 33, pp. 1-56.
  • Mclaren M. A. 2021. Decolonizing Feminism Through Intersectional Praxis on Serene Khader’s Decolonizing Universalism. Metaphilosophy. Vol 52 (1), pp 93-110.
  • Mohanty C.T. 2002. Under Western Eyes” Revisited: Feminist Solidarity through Anticapitalist Struggles. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. Vol 28(2), pp 499-535.
  • Okin, S. M.1998. Feminism, Women's Human Rights, and Cultural Differences. Hypatia. 13, (2), pp. 32-52.
  • Penna D. R & Campbell P. J. 1998. Human rights and culture: Beyond universality and relativism. Third World Quarterly. Vol 19(1), pp. 7-27.

Week 3: Gender based violence from the global to the local

Required Reading:

Additional Reading

Week 4: Gender and War from Feminist, Queer, and Decolonial perspectives

Required Reading:

Additional Reading

  • Ahall, Linda, 'The Writing of Heroines: Motherhood and Female Agency in Political Violence', Security Dialogue, Vol. 43, No. 4 (2012), pp. 287-303.
  • MacKenzie, Megan H. (2012),, 'Let Women Fight: Ending the US Military's Female Combat Ban', Foreign Affairs. Vol 91(6), pp. 32-42.

Week Five: Women, Peace and Security’ in Global Politics

Required Reading

  • Aroussi, S. 2017. National Action Plans as foreign policy tools: Rethinking women’s security in the Global North. In Aroussi, S. (ed.) Rethinking National Action Plans (NAPS) on Women, Peace and Security, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series, IOS press.
  • Hagen, J. J. 2016. “Queering women, peace and security.” International Affairs, 92(2), 313-332.
  • Goetz, A. M. and Jenkins, R. (2018) “Participation and Protection: Security Council Dynamics, Bureaucratic Politics, and the Evolution of the Women, Peace, and Security Agenda” in Ní Aoláin, F. et al. The Oxford Handbook of Gender and Conflict. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Otto, D (2010) “Power and Danger: Feminist Engagement with International Law Through the UN Security Council” Australian Feminist Law Journal, Volume 32, pp. 97-121.

Additional Reading

  • Aroussi, S. 2020. ‘Strange bedfellows: Interrogating the unintended consequences of integrating countering violent extremism with the UN’s Women, Peace and Security agenda in Kenya. Politics and Gender. pp 1-31.
  • Ní Aoláin, F. and Valji, N. 2019. Scholarly Debates and Contested Meanings of WPS.  In Davies, S. E. and True, J. (eds)The Oxford Handbook of Women, Peace, and Security. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 53-66.
  • Ní Aoláin, F. (2020) “What Does Post-conflict Security Mean for Women?” in Ewig, C. Tripp, A. M., and M. M. Ferree (eds.) Gender, Violence, and Human Security. New York: New York University Press, p.33-49.
  • Pratt, N. (2013) “Reconceptualizing Gender, Reinscribing Racial—Sexual Boundaries in International Security: The Case of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on "Women, Peace and Security" International Studies Quarterly Vol.57 (4) p.772-783.
  • Shepherd, L (2016) “Making war safe for women? National Action Plans and the militarisation of the women, peace and security agenda” International Political Science Review, Vol 37 (3) pp. 324-335.
  • Shepherd, L. 2021. Narrating women, Peace and Security: logics of Global Governance. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Swaine, A. and O’Rourke, C. 2015. Guidebook On CEDAW General Recommendation No. 30 and the UN Security Council Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security. Available online

Lecture Six: Gender in Peace-making and Peace Settlements

Required Reading

Additional Reading

Week Eight: Sexual Violence in Armed Conflicts

Required Reading

  • Aroussi, Sahla (2018) ‘Perceptions of justice and hierarchies of rape: Rethinking approaches to sexual violence in Eastern Congo from the ground up’, The International Journal of Transitional Justice. DOI: 10.1093/ijtj/ijy005

Additional Reading

  • Autesserre, S. 2012. Dangerous Tales: Dominant Narratives on the Congo and Their Unintended Consequences.  African Affairs. Vol 111(443), pp. 202–222.
  • Baaz, M. E. and Stern, M. 2009. Why Do Soldiers Rape? Masculinity, Violence, and Sexuality in the Armed Forces in the Congo (DRC). International Studies Quarterly. Vol 53(2), pp. 495-518.
  • Oosterveld, V. 2014. Sexual Violence Directed against Men and Boys in Armed Conflict or Mass Atrocity: Addressing a Gendered Harm in International Criminal Tribunals, Journal of International Law and International Relations. Vol10, pp. 107- 128.
  • Palermo, T. and Peterman A. 2011. Undercounting, overcounting and the longevity of flawed estimates: statistics on sexual violence in conflict” Bulletin of the World Health Organization. Vol 89, pp. 924-925.
  • Peterman, A., Palermo, T. and Bredenkamp, C. 2011. Estimates and Determinants of Sexual Violence against Women in the Democratic Republic of Congo. American Journal of Public Health. Vol 101(6), pp. 1060–1067.

Week Nine: Transitional Justice

Required Reading

Additional Reading

Week 10: Lecture: Gender, Terrorism and Violent Extremism

Required Reading

Additional Reading

  • Puar, J.K. and Rai, A., 2002. Monster, terrorist, fag: The war on terrorism and the production of docile patriots. Social Text, 20(3), 117-148.
  • Rao, R. 2010. 'Queer in the Time of Terror', in Third World Protest: Between Home and the World. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, pp. 173-195.
  • Um, J. Y. 2012. Citizen and Terrorist, Citizen as Terrorist: Military, Citizenship, and Race in the Age of War on Terror. Postmodern Culture, 22(3).

This list was last updated on 06/12/2021