Leeds University Library

LUBS5330M - Module Reading List

Human Resource Management, 2011/12, Semester 1, 2
Prof. Robert Mackenzie
rfm@lubs.leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Reading list for LUBS 5335 Human Resource Management

Course Texts

A number of textbooks are available which cover most of the substantive areas included in the core course. Stephen Bach’s edited collection provides the closest fit with the content and ethos of the course, although this course is not comprehensive:

Bach, S. (ed.) (2005) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition Blackwell Publishing

It is recommended that you should buy at least one other text. The following texts are recommended:

Beardwell, I. and Clayton, T. (2007) Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach Prentice Hall.

Boxall, P. and Purcell, J. (2008) Strategy and Human Resource Management, Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan.

Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A. (2008) Human resource management at work : people management and development London: CIPD.

Redman, T and Wilkinson, A. (2006) Contemporary Human Resource Management: Text and Cases, London: Prentice Hall

Storey, J. (2007) Human Resource Management a critical text, Thompson, London, 3rd edition

Harzing, A-W. and Pinnington, A.H. (2011) International Human Resource Management, London: Sage, 3rd edition

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Readings for individual lectures and classes

Introducing and theorizing HRM:

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Lecture 1: What is HRM?

This first lecture and class accounts for the emergence of HRM and place it within its broader social and economic context. The overall debate suggests that HRM is not a static thing and does not have a single meaning but historically and geographically contingent, its meanings and practices varying over time and space. The first lecture will ask: how can we account for the emergence of HRM? Are people really the company’s most valuable asset? How is HRM different from people management practices of the past? What are the defining characteristics of HRM?

Key Readings

Bach, S. (2005) (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition, London: Blackwell. (Chapter 1).

Storey, J. (2007) Human Resource Management a critical text, Thompson, London, 3rd edition (Chapter 1 and 2).

Bratton, J. and Gold, J. (2003) Human Resource Management: Theory and Practice, Basingstoke: Palgrave (Chapter 1 and 2).

Redman, T. and Wilkinson, A. (2006) Contemporary Human Resource Management: Text and Cases, Harlow: Prentice Hall (Chapter 1 and 2)

Sission, K. and Storey, J. (2000) The realities of human resource management : managing the employment relationship, Buckingham: Open University Press (Chapter 1)

Further Reading

Keenoy, T. (1990) ‘HRM: A Case of the Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing?’ Personnel review., 19(2): 3-9.

Leopold, J. Harris, L. and Watson, T. (1999) Strategic human resourcing : principles, perspectives and practice, London: Financial Times/ Pitman. (Chapter 1)

Noon, M. (1992) ‘HRM: A Map, Model or Theory?’, in P. Blyton & T. Turnbull (eds.), Reassessing human resource management, London: Sage (Chapter 2).

Schuler, R. and Jackson, S. (1999) Strategic Human Resource Management. Oxford: Blackwell. (Chapters1 and 6)

Walton, R. (1985) ‘From Control to Commitment in the Workplace’, Harvard business review., March/April

Legge, K. (1995) Human Resource Management: rhetorics and realities, Basingstoke: Palgrave (Chapters 3 and 9).

Redman, T. and Wilkinson, A. (2006) Contemporary Human Resource Management text and cases, London: Prentice Hall/FT (Chapter 8).

Ulrich, D. (1998) ‘A new mandate for human resources’, Harvard business review, January/February, pp 124-34.

Cooke, F., Shen, J. and McBride, A. (2005) ‘Outsourcing HR as competitive strategy’, Human resource management., 44, 4, pp 413-432.

Marchington, M., Grimshaw, D., Rubery, J. and Willmott, H. (2005) (eds.) Fragmenting work : blurring organizational boundaries and disordering hierarchies, Oxford: Oxford University Press (chapters 1 & 3)

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The HRM cycle

This section of the course will examine some of the key ‘levers’ of HRM, and their implementation in theory and practice. A number of themes are explored in this segment of the course notably: the divergence between the rhetoric of these practices, posited as objective and clearly linked to models of HRM, and reality; the fit (or lack of it) between these practices, other elements of HRM and performance; and the importance of giving consideration to the broader institutional context in which these HRM practices are implemented.

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Lecture 2: Training and development

This lecture will examine the importance of training to HRM. It will consider the relationship between training and competitive performance and examine why training practices and investment levels vary across nation states. The lecture will explore the extent to which new methods of work organisation and competitive pressures are encouraging firms to become ‘learning organisations’. The session will also consider the extent to which recent government initiatives been successful in promoting learning within the workplace? 

Key Readings

Ashton, D. (2004) ‘The political economy of workplace learning’ in Rainbird, H. Fuller, A. and Munro, A. (eds.) Workplace learning in context, London: Routledge.

Felstead, A., Fuller, A., Jewson, N., Kakavelakis, K. and Unwin, L. (2007) ’Grooving to the same tunes? Learning, training and productive systems in the aerobics studio’, Work, employment and society., 21, 2.

Keep, E. (2005) ‘Skills, Training and the Quest for the Holy Grail of Influence and Status’, Chapter 8 in Bach, S. (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition, Cambridge: Blackwell.

Grugulis, I. (2003) ‘Putting skills to work: learning and employment at the start of the century’, Human resource management journal., 13(2): 3-12.

NB All the readings in this special issue of the journal are also useful.  

Wallis, E., Stuart, M. and Greenwood, I. (2005) '”Learners of the workplace unite!" An empirical examination of the trade union learning representative initiative, Work, employment and society., 19(2): 283-304

Further Reading

Ashton, D. and Felstead, A. (2001) ‘Training and Development’, in J. Storey (ed.) Human Resource Management: A Critical Text, (second edition) London: Routledge.

Crouch, C., Finegold, D. and Sako, M. (2001) Are skills the answer? : the political economy of skill creation in advanced industrial countries, Oxford: OUP

Finegold, D. (1999) ‘Creating self-sustaining high-skill ecosystems’, Oxford review of economic policy. , 15(1): 60-81.

Finegold, D. and Soskice, D. (1988) ‘The Failure of Training in Britain: Analysis and Prescription’, Oxford review of economic policy. , 4(3): 21-52.

Rainbird, H. (ed) (2000) Training in the workplace : critical perspectives on learning at work : London: MacMillan (esp. chapters 8 and 10). 

Rainbird, H. Fuller, A. and Munro, A. (2004) (eds) Workplace learning in context, London, Routledge.

Stuart, M. (2001) ‘ Contesting Partnership: evaluating the demise of a national training agreement', Journal of vocational education & training. Vol.53, No.1: 5.

Wallis, E. and Stuart, M. (2007) A Collective Learning Culture: A Qualitative Study of Workplace Learning Agreements, Unionlearn Research Paper Number 3. Available online at : http://www.unionlearn.org.uk/files/publications/documents/101.pdf

Warhurst, C., Keep, E. and Grugulis, I. (2004) The skills that matter, Basingstoke: Palgrave

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Lecture 3: Recruitment and Selection

This lecture and seminar will examine the recruitment and selection cycle, beginning with a consideration of HR planning and its importance within HRM, before moving on to look at recruitment strategies and selection techniques. The session will consider the widely used ‘psychometric model’ of recruitment and selection and evaluate the usefulness of this approach for understanding recruitment and selection decisions. 

Key Readings

Greenwood, I. (2007) ‘Recruitment in the retail sector: a large supermarket’, Work and Employment Relations Division Teaching Case, University of Leeds.

Bach, S. (2005) (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition, London: Blackwell. (Chapters 5 and 10).

Callaghan, G. and Thompson, P. (2002) ‘We recruit attitude’: The selection and shaping of routine call centre labour, Journal of Management Studies., 39(2): 233-254.

Newell, S. (2005) ‘Recruitment and Selection’, Chapter 5 in Bach, S. (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition, Cambridge: Blackwell.

Redman, T. and Wilkinson, A. (2006) Contemporary Human Resource Management, London: Prentice Hall/FT (Chapter 3)

Ramsey, H. and Scholarios, S. (1999) ‘Selective Decisions: challenging orthodox analyses of the hiring process’, International journal of management reviews., 1(4): 63-89.

Wolf, A. and Jenkins, A. (2006) ‘Explaining greater test use for selection: the role of HR professionals in a world of expanding regulation’, Human resource management journal., 16(2): 193-213.

Further Reading

Branham, J. (1994) Human resource planning, London: Institute of Personnel and Development.

Forde, C. (2001) ‘Temporary arrangements: the activities of employment agencies in the UK’, Work, employment and society., 15(3): 633-644.

Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A. (2004) ‘Staffing and Resourcing the Organisation’ Chapter 6 in Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A. (eds.) Human Resource Management at Work, London: CIPD

Millmore, M. (2003) Just how extensive is the practice of strategic recruitment and selection’, Irish journal of management., 24(1): 87-108.

Morrell, K., Loan-Clarke, J. and Wilkinson, A. ‘Unweaving Leaving: the use of models in the management of employee turnover’, International journal of management reviews., 3(3): 5-22.

Smith, C., Daskalaki, M., Elger, T. And Brown, D. ’Labour turnover and management retention strategies in new manufacturing plants’, International journal of human resource management., 15(2): 371-396.

Searle, R. (2003) Selection and recruitment : a critical text, Milton Keynes: Open University Press.

Taylor, S. (2002) People Resourcing, London: CIPD.

Wilk, S. and Cappelli, P. (2003) Understanding the determinants of employer use of selection methods’, Personnel psychology., 56(1): 103-124.

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Lecture 4: Pay and reward systems

How far have payments systems been individualised, and with what effects on performance? What are the implications and consequences of ‘individualised’ payment systems for employees? What are the main preconditions for the development of PRP? This lecture will consider the changing nature of payment systems and explore the evolving role of reward management in the furtherance of HRM?

Key Readings

Bone, J. (2006) ‘‘The longest day’’ ‘flexible contracts, performance related pay and risk shifting in the direct selling sector in the UK’, Work, employment and society., 20, 1.

Corby; S. White, G. and Stanworth, C. (2005) ‘No news is good news? Evaluating new pay systems’, Human resource management journal. 15(1): 4-24. 

Kessler, I. (2005) ‘Remuneration systems’, in Bach, S. (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition, Oxford: Blackwell.

Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A. (2004) ‘Motivation and Pay Systems’, Chapter 12 in Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A. (eds.) Human Resource Management at Work, London: CIPD. 

Rubery, J. and Edwards, P. (2003) Low Pay and the National Minimum Wage’, in Edwards, P (ed.)Industrial Relations :Theory and Practice, Oxford: Blackwell.

Further Reading   

Bratton, J. and Gold, J. (2003) Human resource management : Theory and Practice. Basingstoke: Palgrave (Chapter 9).

Brown, M. (2001) ‘Merit pay preferences among public sector employees’, Human resource management journal., 11(4): 38-54.  

Conyon, M., Peck, S. and Read, L. (2001) Performance Pay and Corporate Structure in UK Firms’, European management journal. 19(1): 73-82.

Hendry, C., Woodward, S., Bradley, P. and Perkins, S. ‘Performance and Rewards: cleaning out the stables’, Human resource management journal, 10(3): 46-62.

Kelly, A. and Monks, K. (1998) ‘View from the bridge and life on the deck: contrasts and contradiction in performance-related pay’, in Mabey, C. Skinner, D. and Clarke, T. (eds.) Experiencing human resource management. London: Sage.

Sisson, K. and Storey, J. (2000) The realities of human resource management : managing the employment relationship. Buckingham: OUP. (Chapter 5)  

White, G. and Druker, J. (2000) Reward management : a critical text. Routledge. (Chapters 9 and 10).

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Lecture 5: Performance management

This lecture and seminar will consider evolving systems of performance management, focusing in particular on performance appraisal. What is the role of performance appraisal within the context of organisational change? What are the kinds of issues and problems that emerge in relation to performance appraisal? Does performance appraisal constitute a form of organisational control or is it part of the process of individualisation within the employment relation?

Key Readings

Vincent, S. (2007) ‘Performance Appraisal in a large manufacturing firm: The case of Kitchenco’, Work and Employment Relations Division Teaching Case, University of Leeds.

Bach, S. (2005) ‘New Directions in Performance Management’, Chapter 11 in Bach, S. (ed) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition, Oxford: Blackwell.

Brown, M and Benson, J. (2003) Rated to exhaustion? Reactions to performance appraisal processes. Industrial relations journal., 34(1): 67-81

Fletcher, C. (2001) ‘Performance appraisal and management: The developing research agenda’, Journal of occupational psychology., 74(4) 473-487.

White, M. et al (2004) Managing to change? : British workplaces and the future of work. London: Palgrave. (Chapters 4 and 6)

Further Reading

Boxall, P. and Purcell, J. (2003) Strategy and Human Resource Management. London: Palgrave. (Chapter 7)

Grint, K. (1993) ‘What is Wrong with Performance Appraisal’? a Critique and a Suggestion’, Human resource management journal., 3(3)

Lufhans, F. and Peterson, S. (2003) ‘360-degree feedback with systematic coaching: empirical analysis suggests a winning combination’, Human resource management., 42(3): 243-256.

Mabey, C. (2001) ‘Closing the Circle: Participant views of a 360 degree Feedback Programme'’. Human resource management journal., 11(1): 44-51.

Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A. ‘Performance Management’, Chapter 7 in Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A. (eds.) Human Resource Management at Work, London: CIPD

McGregor, D. (1957) ‘An Uneasy Look at Performance Appraisal’, Harvard business review. , 35: 89-94.

Newton, T. and Findlay, P. (1996) ‘Playing God? The Performance of Appraisal’, Human resource management journal., 1(2)

Pritchard, R. and Payne, S. (2003) ‘Performance management practices and motivation’, in D. Holman, T. Wall, C.Clegg., P. Sparrow and A Howard (eds.) The new workplace handbook : a guide to the human impact of modern technologies and working practices, London: Wiley.

Townley, B. (1993) ‘Performance Appraisal and the Emergence of Management’, Journal of Management Studies., 30(2)

Townley, B. (1999) ‘Practical reason and performance appraisal’, Journal of Management Studies, 36(3): 287-306.

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Lecture 6: Restructuring

This lecture and seminar will examine the nature of restructuring and redundancy, and its consequences. What is the extent of restructuring? Why do firms undertake restructuring and what are the effects? What are the social and economic consequences of redundancy for those experiencing it? What are the effects of redundancy on those remaining within ‘downsizing’ organisations? To what extent are restructuring decisions shaped by the institutional environment in which firms operate?

Key readings

Forde, C., Stuart, M., Gardiner, G. , Greenwood, I. MacKenzie, R. and Perrett, R. (2006) ‘Socially responsible restructuring in an era of mass redundancies’, Centre for Employment Relations innovation and Change Working Paper number 5.
Available at: http://lubswww2.leeds.ac.uk/CERIC/index.php?id=374

MacKenzie, R. Stuart, M., Forde, C., Greenwood, I., Perrett, R. and Gardiner, G. (2006) 'All that is Solid? Class, identity and the maintenance of occupational community amongst redundant Welsh steel workers', Sociology.. 40(5): 833-852.

Cooke, F.L. Earnshaw, J. Marchington, M. and Rubery, J. (2004) ‘For better and for worse: transfer of undertakings and the reshaping of employment relations’, International journal of human resource management., 15(2): 276-294.

Kets de Vries, M (1997) ‘The Downside of Downsizing’, Human relations. , 50(1) 11-50. 

Sahdev, K. (2003)  ‘Survivors' reactions to downsizing: the importance of contextual factors’, Human resource management journal., 13(4): 56-74.

Thornhill, A. and Saunders, M. (1998) ‘The Meanings, Consequences and Implications of the Management of Downsizing and Redundancy: A Review’, Personnel review., 27(4): 271-295.

Further reading

Clair, J.A and Dufresne, R.L. (2004) ‘Playing the grim reaper: How employees experience carrying out a downsizing’, Human relations., 57(12): 1597-1625.

Devine, K., Reay, T., Stainton, L. and Collins-Nakai, R. (2003) ‘Downsizing outcomes: Better a Victim than a Survivor?’, Human resource management. , 42(2): 109-124.

Flanagan, D.J. and O’Shaunessey, K. (2005) ‘The Effects of Layoffs on Firm Reputation’, Journal of management. 31(3) 445-463.

Forde, C., Stuart, M., Mackenzie, R. And Wallis, E. (2007) ‘The European Globalisation Adjustment Fund and the regulation of redundancy in Europe’, Paper presented at the World Congress of the International Industrial Relations Association, University of Sydney, August 2009

*Copy available from Chris Forde on request.

Gardiner, J. Stuart, M., Forde, C. Greenwood, I., Mackenzie, R. and Perrett, R. (2007) 'Work-Life Balance over the Life Course: Employees' perspectives on retirement transitions following redundancy' International journal of human resource management. 18:3, 476–489.

Thornhill, A. and Saunders, M. (1998) ‘The Meanings, Consequences and Implications of the Management of Downsizing and Redundancy: A Review’, Personnel review., 27(4): 271-295.

Turnbull, P. and Wass, V. (1997) Job Insecurity and Labour Market Lemons: The (Mis)management of Redundancy in Steel Making, Coal Mining and Port Transport’, Journal of Management Studies., 34(1): 27-50.

Westergaard, J., Noble, I. and Walker, A. (1989) After redundancy : the experience of economic insecurity. Oxford: Blackwell.

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Key issues in the future of work (Part I)

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Lecture 7: Equality and diversity

Why are equality and diversity policies and practice central to contemporary HRM? What different approaches do companies take in trying to achieve equality and diversity at work? For example, is there a business case for diversity? What evidence is there for effective implementation of policies? To what extent and how is awareness of equality and diversity embedded across the range of HRM practices?

Key readings

Dickens, L. (2005) ‘Walking the Talk? Equality and Diversity in Employment’, in Bach, S. (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition (4th edition). Oxford: Blackwell: 178-208.

Hoque, K. and Noon, M. (2004) ‘Equal opportunities policy and practice in Britain: evaluating the ‘empty shell’ hypothesis’ Work, employment and society., 18(3) 481-506.

Liff, S. (1999) ‘Diversity and equal opportunities: room for a constructive compromise?’ Human resource management journal., 9 (1): 65-75

Noon, M. (2007) ‘The Fatal Flaws of Diversity and the Business Case for Ethnic Minorities. Work, employment and society, 24, 4, 728-739.

Shen, J., Chanda, A., D’Netto, B. and Monga, M. (2009) ‘Managing diversity through human resource management: an international perspective and conceptual framework’. International journal of human resource management.. 20: 2, 235-51

Walby, S. (2005) Gender (in)equality and the future of work. Equal Opportunities Commission. Access at http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fass/sociology/papers/Walby-Gender(in)equalityandthefutureofwork.pdf

Further reading

Creegan, C. et al. (2003) ‘Race Equality Policies at Work: employee perceptions of the ‘implementation gap’ in a UK local authority’, Work, employment and society., 17 (4) pp. 617-40

CIPD (2006) Managing Diversity Measuring Success. London: CIPD Access at: http://resources.greatplacetowork.com/article/pdf/managing_diversity.pdf

Kersley, B. et al (2006) ‘Equality, Diversity and Work-Life Balance’, Inside the workplace : findings from the 2004 workplace employment relations survey. London: Routledge

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Lecture 8: Flexibility and working time

Why has there been a growth in non-standard working-time arrangements? How are new ‘flexible’ working time arrangements affecting the wage-effort bargain and the work-life balance of employees? Are popular perceptions of work intensification and ‘work-life imbalance’ matched by empirical evidence? To what extent is there a business case for flexible working and work-life balance policies and practice? What are the barriers to effective implementation of these policies? What are the implications for gender equity in the workplace? How do working time arrangements and patterns of control vary in different institutional and market contexts?

Key readings

Berg, P., Appelbaum, E., Bailey, T. and Kalleberg, A. L. (2004) ‘Contesting time: International comparisons of employee control of working time’ Industrial and labor relations review. 57(3): 331-49.

Durbin, S. and Tomlinson, J (2010) Female part-time workers: networks and career mobility. Work, employment and society, 24, (4): 621-640

Fagan, C., Hegewisch, A. and Pillager, J. (2006) Out of Time: Why Britain needs a new approach to working-time flexibility. London: TUC www.tuc.org.uk/extras/outoftime.pdf

McBride, A. (2003) ‘Reconciling competing pressures for working-time flexibility: an impossible task in the National Health Service (NHS)?’ Work, employment and society . 17(1): 159-70.

Rubery, J. Ward, K., Grimshaw, D. and Beynon, H. (2005) ‘Working time, industrial relations and the employment relationship’ Time & Society. 14(1) 89-111.

Walsh, J. (2005) ‘Work-Life Balance: Challenging the Overwork Culture’ in Bach, S. (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition (4th edition). Oxford: Blackwell: 148-77.

Further reading

Green, F. (2001) ‘It’s been a hard day’s night’, British Journal of Industrial Relations., 39(1): 53-80.

Haas, L. and Hwang, C. (2008) The impact of taking parental leave on fathers’ participation and relationship with children: some lessons from Sweden’ Community, Work & Family, 11 (1): 85-105.

Lewis, S. (2001), “Restructuring workplace cultures: the ultimate work-family challenge?” Women in management review., 16(1) 21-29.

Sheridan, A. and Conway, L. (2001), “Workplace flexibility: reconciling the needs of employers and employees.” Women in management review, 16(1): 5-11.

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Lecture 9: Emotional labour and HRM: the control of work in the new workplace

This session will explore issues of control and emotion management in the new workplace, focusing on the interactive services sector. What is emotion work and emotional labour? How do employees experience and respond to emotional rules? How does the type and size of workplace influence the monitoring and control of emotional labour? What is the role of formal training and informal socialisation in the acquisition of emotional skills?

Key readings

Bolton, S., C. and Boyd, C. (2003) ‘Trolley Dolly or Skilled Emotion Manager? Moving on from Hochschild’s Managed Heart’ Work, employment and society 17(2): 289-308

Callaghan, G. and Thompson, P. (2002) ‘”We recruit attitude”: the selection and shaping of routine call centre labour’. Journal of Management Studies. 39(2): 233-54.

Deery, S. (2005) ‘Customer Service Work, Emotional Labour and Performance’ in Bach, S. (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition (4th edition). Oxford: Blackwell: 346-71.

Hochschild, A. (1983) TThe managed heart : commercialization of human feeling , Berkeley: University of California Press (Chapters 1, 3 and 6)

Lopez, S. H. (2006) ‘Emotional Labor and Organized Emotional Care: Conceptualizing Nursing Home Care Work’. Work and occupations., 33, 2: 133-60

Seymour, D. and Sandiford, P. (2005) ‘Learning emotion rules in service organizations’ Work, employment and society,19(3): 547-64

Further reading:

Ashforth, B. E. and Humphrey, R. H. (1995) ‘Emotion in the Workplace: A Reappraisal’, Human relations., 48, 2, pp. 97-125.

Bolton, S. (2004) ‘Conceptual Confusion: Emotional Work as Skilled Work’ in Warhurst, C. Grugulis, I. and Keep, E. (Eds.) The skills that matter, Basingstoke: Palgrave

Brannan, M. J. (2005) ‘Once More With Feeling: Ethnographic Reflections on the Mediation of Tension in a Small Team of Call Centre Workers’ Gender, work and organization. 12(5): 420-39

Knights, D. and McCabe, D. (1998) ‘What Happens When the Phone Goes Wild? Staff, Stress and Spaces for Escape in a BPR Telephone Banking Regime’. Journal of Management Studies. 35(2).

Knights, D. and McCabe, D. (2000) ‘Ain’t Misbehavin? Opportunities for Resistance under New Forms of Quality Management’. Sociology. 34(3).

Noon, M and Blyton, P. (2002) in The Realities of Work. London. Macmillan. ‘Emotion Work’, (Chapter 7)

Taylor, P. and Bain, P. (1999) ‘An Assembly Line in Their Head: Work and Employee Relations in the Call Centre’. Industrial relations journal. 30(2).

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Lecture 10: Changing HRM roles and relationships

The second lecture then turns to the historical development of the HR profession and to current debates about the role and responsibilities of the HR function. Here the focus will be on trends towards HR outsourcing, the growing involvement of line manager and on attempts to transform the HR function to develop the role of ‘business partner’.

Key Readings

Bach, S. (2005) (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition, London: Blackwell. (Chapter 1).

Storey, J. (2007) Human Resource Management: a critical text Thompson, London, 3rd edition (Chapters 2, 3 and 13).

Redman, T. and Wilkinson, A. (2006) Contemporary Human Resource Management, London: Prentice Hall/FT (Chapter 8).

Bratton, J. and Gold, J. (2003) Human Resource Management theory and practice , London: Macmillan (Chapters 1-2) 

Torrington, D., Hall, L., and Taylor, S. (2005) Human Resource Management, London: FT/Prentice Hall. (Chapter 1)

Further reading

Ulrich, D. (1998) ‘A new mandate for human resources’, Harvard business review., January/February, pp 124-34.

Cooke, F., Shen, J. and McBride, A. (2005) ‘Outsourcing HR as competitive strategy’, Human resource management., 44, 4, pp 413-432.

Marchington, M., Grimshaw, D., Rubery, J. and Willmott, H. (2005) (eds.) Fragmenting work : blurring organizational boundaries and disordering hierarchies, Oxford: Oxford University Press (chapters 1 & 3)

Ordanini, A. and Silvestri, G. (2008) ‘Recruitment and selection services: efficiency and competitive reasons in the outsourcing of HR practices’, International journal of human resource management., 19, 2, pp 372-391.

Kosnik, T., Wong-Ming, and Hoover, K. (2006). Outsourcing versus insourcing in the human resource supply chain: a comparison of five generic models. Personnel review., 35 (6): 671-683.

Greer, C., Youngblood, A. and Gray, D. (1999) ‘Human resource management outsourcing: the make or buy decision’, The Academy of Management executive., 13, 3, pp 85-96.

SEMESTER 2

HRM strategy and work organization:

This segment of the Programme combines insights from historical and contemporary research on the impact of different methods of management control and labour responses to these methods in varying organizational contexts. It addresses competing theoretical explanations for the organization of work, which provides the foundations for exploring debates on various aspects of contemporary workplace organization. It looks at the effects of measures to promote team-working, enlarge the pattern of employee involvement in decision making at enterprise level, and shift the balance and influence of voice mechanisms in the workplace. The performance implications of HRM strategy is a major issue in contemporary policy and practitioner debates. Does HRM make a difference to the bottom line, and if so how and why? Is the context in which HRM practices are deployed – for example in more or less integrated organizations or highly fragmented networks –relevant to the magnitude of the performance gains from such initiatives? What theories and concepts can help illuminate the complex linkages between HRM, strategy and performance? What lessons can be derived from the classic historical studies of the relationships between strategy and structure? Does strategy or structure have priority or is the relationship more complex and historically contingent?

These questions are addressed through an intensive review of the relevant literatures and case studies of the performance of firms, industries and national economies.

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Lecture 11 Theoretical perspectives on work

The lecture and class tackles theories about the economy and political economy. It asks: why is work usually organized along hierarchical lines? How would you account for the emergence of the direct employment relationship, and what problems do managers face in writing and enforcing the employment contract? How and why do managers maintain control within the organizations that employ them?

Key Readings

Braverman, H. (1974) Labor and Monopoly Capital, New York: Free Press. (Introduction and Chapter 1)

Burawoy (1979) Manufacturing consent : changes in the labor process under monopoly capitalism, Chicago: University of Chicago Press

Nolan, P. (1992) ‘ Securing human resources : employer strategies and the labour market’, in E. Thorne (ed.) Challenge of the economic environment, Open University Press.

Marglin, S. (1976) ‘What do Bosses do?: The Origins and Functions of Hierarchy in Capitalist Production’, in A. Gorz (ed.) The Division of Labour, London: Harvester Press.

Williamson, O. (1975) Markets and hierarchies : analysis and antitrust implications : a study in the economics of internal organization, London: The Free Press (Chapter 4)

Further Reading

Cartier, K. (1994) ‘The transaction costs and benefits of the incomplete contract of employment’, Cambridge journal of economics., 18(2): 181-196.

Edwards, R. (1979) Contested Terrain: The Transformation of the Workplace in the Twentieth Century, London: Heinemann.

Brown, R.K. (1988) ‘The Employment Relationship in Sociological Theory’, in D. Gallie (ed.) Employment in Britain, Oxford: Blackwell,

Jacoby, S. (1985) Employing bureaucracy : managers, unions and the transformation of work in American industry 1900-1945, Columbia: Columbia University Press.

Marginson, P. (1993) ‘Power and Efficiency in the Firm: Understanding the Employment Relationship’, in Pitelis, C. (ed.) Transaction costs, markets and hierarchies, Cambridge: Blackwell.

Thompson, P. and McHugh, D. (2002) Work Organisations a critical introduction, Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Williamson, O. (1980) ‘The Organisation of Work’, Journal of economic behavior & organization., 1(1): 5-38.

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Lecture 12: Work Organization and Team-working

The development of teamwork is central to the evolving nature of HRM. The varied nature of teamworking and the factors that give rise to differences within team structures are widely debated issues. Is teamwork a form of workplace organisation likely to intensify employment within workplaces and undermine voice mechanisms at work or does it enhance the participation of employees? Why does teamworking vary across countries?

Key readings

Bacon, N. Blyton, and P. (2000) ‘High road and low road teamworking: Perceptions of management rationales and organisational and human resource outcomes.’ Human relations., 53:11 (1425-1458)

Belenger, J., Edwards, P.K. and Wright, M. (2003) ‘Commitment at Work and Independence from Management. A study of advanced teamwork,’ Work and occupations., 30:2 (234-252)

Buchanan, J. and Hall, R. (2002) ‘Teams and control on the job: insights from the Australian metal and engineering best practice case studies.The journal of industrial relations. , 44:3 (397-417)

Francis, H. (2003) ‘Teamworking and change: Managing the contradictions’, Human resource management journal, 13(3): 71-90

Greenwood, I. and Randle, H. (2007) ‘Team-working, Restructuring and Skills in the UK and Sweden, European journal of industrial relations., 13(3); 361-377

Harley, G. (2001) ‘Team Membership and the Experience of Work in Britain: an Analysis of the WERS98 Data, Work, employment and society , 15:4 (721-742)

Sewell, G. (2005) ‘Doing what comes naturally? Why we need a practical ethics of teamwork’ International journal of human resource management., 16(2): 202–218

Van Hootegem, G., Benders, J., Delarue, A. and Procter, S. (2005) ‘Teamworking: looking back and looking forward’, International journal of human resource management. , 16(2): 167-173

Further Reading

Barker, J.R. (1993). ‘Tightening the Iron Cage: Concertive Control in Self-Managing Teams’, Administrative science quarterly., 38(2): 408-437.

Martinez Lucio, M. et al. (1999). ‘The Question of Teamworking and Union Identity in the Royal Mail: Beyond Negotiation’, in Procter, S and Mueller, F (eds.) Teamworking, London: Macmillan

Baldry, C., Bain, P., and Taylor, P (1998). ‘Bright Satanic Offices: Intensification, Control and Team Taylorism’, in Thompson, P and Warhurst, C (eds.). Workplaces of the future, London: Macmillan

Bain, P., Watson, A., Mulvey, G., Taylor, P and Gall, G, (2002). ‘Taylorism targets and the pursuit and quantity by call centre management’, New technology, work and employment., 17(3): 170-185

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Lecture 13: Involvement, Voice and Representation

Involvement is a key element in HRM strategies to secure higher commitment, employee engagement and consummate rather than perfunctory participation in the processes of production and service provision. What are the key current forms of employee involvement in major companies, how successful are they in generating cooperation and commitment, and do they affect the bottom line? Is `voice’ dependent on the presence of a collective institution (trade union) in the workplace?

Key Readings

Freeman, R.and Medoff, J (1979). ‘The two faces of unionism’, The public interest., No. 57, Fall, pp 69-93

Sisson,K and Storey, J. (2000). The realities of human resource management : managing the employment relationship. Buckingham: OUP (chapter 4)

Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A., (2005). `Direct Participation and Involvement’ in Bach, S (ed.) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition Oxford: Blackwell (Chapter 15)

Hyman, J, and Mason, B. (1995). Managing employee involvement and participation, London: Sage (Chapters 1-3, 5,7 and 8)

White, M, Hill, S, Mills, C and Smeaton, D. (2004). Managing to change? : British workplaces and the future of work Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan (chapter 4)

Kochan, T and Ostermann, P. (1998). ‘The Mutual Gains Enterprise’, in Mabey, C et al (eds), Strategic human resource management : a reader. London: Sage

Ramsay, H, Scholarios ,D, and Harley, B. (2000). `Employees and high performance work systems: testing inside the black box’, British Journal of Industrial Relations., 38(4) 501-31

Further Reading

Ackers, P and Payne, J (1998). ‘British trade unions and social partnership: rhetoric, reality and strategy’, International journal of human resource management., 9(3): 529-550.

Oxenbridge, S., and Brown, W. (2004). ‘Achieving a new equilibrium? The stability of cooperative employer-union relationships’, Industrial relations journal., 35(5): 388-402.

Cully, M. et al. (1999). Britain at work : as depicted by the 1998 workplace employee relations survey, London: Routledge (Chapters 9,10).

Tailby, S., Richardson, M., Stewart, P ., Danford, A and Upchurch, M (2004). ‘Partnership at work and worker participation: an NHS case study’. Industrial relations journal., 35(5): 403-418.

Stuart, M and Martinez Lucio, M (eds) (2005). Partnership and modernisation in employment relations, London: Routledge (Chapters 1,4,14)

Marchington, M. (1998). ‘Partnership in context: towards a European model’. In Marchinton, M and Sparrow, P. (eds.) Human resource management : the new agenda, London: FT Pitman publishing.

Martines Lucio, M. and Stuart M. (2004). ‘Swimming against the tide: social partnership, mutual gains and the revival of “tired” HRM’. International journal of human resource management., 15(2): 410-424

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Lecture 14: Organizational forms and HRM

How does organisational form influence and constrain the effects of HRM?

Are integrated organisations more likely to pursue coherent HRM strategies than fragmented organisations? How does the nature and structure of stakeholder relationships within organisations affect HRM?

Key Readings

Konzelmann, S., Conway, N., Trenberth, L. and Wilkinson, F. (2006). `Corporate Governance and Human Resource Management’, British Journal of Industrial Relations., 44(3): 541-563

Marchington, M., Grimshaw, D., Rubery, J and Willmott, H. (eds.) (2005) Fragmenting work : blurring organizational boundaries and disordering hierarchies, Oxford: OUP (Chapters 1 – 7)

Rubery, J., Earnshaw, J., Marchington, M., Cooke, F. L. and Vincent, S. (2002). ‘Changing Organisational Forms and the Employment Relationship,’ Journal of Management Studies., 39(5), pp. 645- 672

Further Reading

Ackroyd, S. (2002) The organization of business : applying organizational theory to contemporary change, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hunter, L. Beaumont, P. and Sinclair, D. (1996) ‘A ‘Partnership’ Route to Human Resource Management’, Journal of Management Studies., 33(2), pp. 235-257.

Purcell, J. (1989). ‘The impact of corporate strategy on human resource management’, in Storey, J. (ed), New Perspectives on Human Resource Management, London: Routledge.

Purcell, J. and Ahlstrand, B. (1994). Human resource management in the multi-divisional company, Oxford: OUP (Chapters 2,3,4.)

Roper, I., Prabhu, V. and Van Zwandenberg, N. (1997) ‘Only Just-in-Time: Japanisation and the ‘Non-Learning’ Firm’, Work, employment and society 11(1), pp. 27-46.

Grimshaw, D., Cooke, Fange-Lee., Grugulis, I. and Vincent, S. (2002). ‘New technology and changing organisational forms: implications for managerial control and skills’,  New technology, work and employment., 17(3): 186-203.

HR in an internationalising political economy:

This group of lectures considers the view that HRM does not occur in a vacuum, and that HR outcomes are intimately tied to the contexts within which practices are adopted. The lectures will argue that specific characteristics of capitalism, local and international economic organisations and national systems each have effects on how HR systems operate and what HR actually is and does.

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Lecture 15: National Systems and HRM

To what extent is the management of people affected by national systems of governance? What are the distinctive characteristics of Anglo-Saxon (UK and USA, etc.), German and Japanese economies with regard to employment relations? How are international pressures impacting on these systems? Is greater flexibility in work and employment essential if firms are to gain a competitive advantage in the modern era?

Key Readings

Clarke, I. and Clayton, T (2007) ‘HRM trends and prospects: a comparative perspective’ in Beardwell, J. and Clayton, T. (eds.) Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, Harlow: Prentice Hall.

Godard, John (2004) ‘A Critical Assessment of the High-Performance Paradigm’ British Journal of Industrial Relations. vol. 42:2 pp. 349 – 78

Hollingshead, G. (2010)International and comparative human resource management, London: McGraw-Hill (Chapter 2)

Muller, M. (1999) ‘Human Resource Management under Institutional Constraints: The Case of Germany’, British journal of management., 10, S31–S44

Rubery, J. and Grimshaw, D. (2003) The organization of employment : an international perspective, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan (Chapter 2, 3 and 6)

Further Reading:

Belanger, J., Edwards, P.K. and Haiven, L. (1994) Workplace industrial relations and the global challenge , Ithaca NY: ILR Press (Chapter 2)

Coates, D. (2000) Models of capitalism : growth and stagnation in the modern era, Cambridge: Polity.

Dore, R. Lazinick, W. and O’Sullivan, M. (1999) ‘Varieties of capitalism in the twentieth century’, Oxford review of economic policy. 15(4): 102-120.

Eaton, J. (2000) Comparative employment relations : an introduction, Cambridge: Polity (Chapters 1 and 13)

Hyman. R. (1999) ‘National Industrial Relations Systems and Transnational Challenges: An Essay in Review’, European journal of industrial relations., 5(1): 89-110.

Lane, C. (1995)Industry and society in Europe : stability and change in Britain, Germany, and France , Eldershot: Edward Elgar (Chapter 5).

Lee, E. (1996) ‘Globalization and labour standards: a review of the issues’, International Labour Review. , 136(2): 173-189.

Legge, K. (1995) Human Resource Management, Basingstoke: Plagrave (Chapter 4)

Locke, R. Kochan, T. and Piore, M. (1995) Employment relations in a changing world economy. Cambridge MA: MIT Press. (Chapter 12)

Peck (1996) Work-place : the social regulation of labor markets, New York: Guilford Press (Chapter 8)

Porter, M. (1990) The Competitive Advantage of Nations, London: Macmillan.

Standing , G. (1997) ‘Globalisation, labour Flexibility and Insecurity’, European journal of industrial relations., 3(1): 7-37.

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Lecture 16: HRM in global organizations

Why do firms internationalize? What is distinctive about transnational corporations? Why are they perceived to be important with regard to the development and dissemination of models of HRM practice? To what extent are they affected by the country from which they emerge and the countries that they choose to locate in?

Key Readings:

Almond, P. and Tregaskis, O. (2007) ‘International HRM’ in Beardwell, J. and Clayton, I. (eds.) Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach, Harlow: Pearson Education Ltd.

Edwards, T. and Ferner, A. (2005) ‘Managing Human Resources in Multinational Companies’ in Bach, S. [Ed.] Managing human resources : personnel management in transition, Oxford: Blackwell.

Hollingshead, G. (2010)International and comparative human resource management, London: McGraw-Hill (Chapter 3)

Marginson, P. Edwards,P. Edwards, T. Ferner, A. and Tregaskis, O. (2010) ‘Employee Representation and Consultative Voice in Multinational Companies Operating in Britain’, British Journal of Industrial Relations., 48(1): 151-180.

Rubery, J. and Grimshaw, D. (2003) The organization of employment : an international perspective, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan (Chapter 8)

Further Readings:

Dickens, P. (2003) Global Shift: Reshaping the Global Economic Map in the 21st Century, London: Sage. (Chapter 7)

Edwards, T. and Ferner, A. (2005) ‘Managing Human Resources in Multinational Companies’ in Bach, S. (2005) Managing human resources : personnel management in transition , Oxford: Blackwell

Scullion, H. (2005) ‘International HRM: An introduction’ in Scullion, H and Linehan, M. (eds.) International human resource management : a critical text, Basingstoke: Palgrave

Scullion, H. and Paauwe, J. (2005) ‘Strategic HRM in multinational companies’ in Scullion, H and Linehan, M. (eds.) International human resource management : a critical text, Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Ferner, A. and Quintanilla, J. (1998) ‘Multinationals, National Business Systems, and HRM: the enduring influence of national identity or a process of “Anglo-Saxonisation”’ International journal of human resource management. 9(4): 710:731.

Ferner, A.and Varul, MZ (2000 ) ‘Internationalisation and the personnel function in German multinationals training’ Human resource management journal. , 10(3): 79-97.

Ferner, A. (1994) ‘Multinational Companies and Human Resource Management: An Overview of Research Issues’, Human resource management journal 4(2): 79-102.

Ferner, A and Edwards, P. (1995) ‘Power and Diffusion of Organizational Change within Multinational Enterprises,’ European journal of industrial relations., 1(2): 229-257.

Dunning, J.H. (1992) Multinational Enterprises and the Global Economy, Wokingham: Addison-Wesley.

Jensen, C. S., Madsen, J. S. and Due, J. (1999) ‘Phases and Dynamics in the Development of EU Industrial Relations Regulation’ Industrial relations journal. 30(2): 118-134.

Marginson, P. (2000) ‘The Eurocompany and Euro Industrial Relations’ European journal of industrial relations. 6(1): 9-34.

Smith, C. and Elger, T. (1997) ‘International Competition, Inward Investment and the Restructuring of European Work and Industrial Relations’ European journal of industrial relations. 3(3): 279-304.

Key issues in the future of work (Part II)

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Lecture 17: HRM Strategy and Performance

Does the application of HRM practices improve business performance? Is there a critical point at which such practices improve performance? What are the mechanisms through which HRM practices impact upon performance? Do individual practices or `bundles’ of practices make the difference? 

Key Readings

Wall, T. and Wood, S. (2005). `The romance of HRM and business performance, and the case for big science’, Human relations., 58(4): 429-462.

Michie, J. and Sheehan, M. (2005). `Business strategy, human resources, labour market flexibility and competive advantage’, International journal of human resource management., 15(3): 445-464

Nolan, P and O’Donnell, K. (2003) `Industrial relations, HRM and performance’ in Edwards, P. (ed.) Industrial Relations: Theory and Practice, Oxford: Blackwell (Chapter 19)

Hoque, K. (1999). ‘Human Resource Management and Performance in the UK Hotel Industry’. British Journal of Industrial Relations., 37(3): 419-443

Huselid, M. (1995). ‘The Impact of Human Resource Management on Turnover, Productivity and Corporate Financial Performance’.Academy of Management journal. 38 (3): 635-672

Further Reading

Guest, D., Michie, J., Sheehan, M and Conway, N. (2003). ‘Human Resource Management and Corporate Performance in the UK’, British Journal of Industrial Relations., 41(2): 291-314

Edwards, P and Wright, M. (2001). ‘High involvement work systems and performance outcomes: the strength of variable, contingent and context bound relationships’, International journal of human resource management., 12(4): 568-585

Guest, D. (2001). ‘Human Resource Management: when research confronts reality’, IInternational journal of human resource management, 12(7): 1092-1106.

Ichniowski, C et al (1996). ‘What Works at Work: Overview and Assessment’, Industrial relations., 35(3).

Ramsey, H., Scholarios, D and Harley, B (2000). ‘Employees and High Performance work systems: testing inside the black box’, British Journal of Industrial Relations., 38(4): 510-31

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Lecture 18: HRM and the Future of Work

 Readings to be confirmed.

This list was last updated on 20/09/2011