Leeds University Library

GERM1060
Seminar Reading List (Semester 1)

Introduction to Modern Germany, 2017/18, Semester 1, 2
Dr Stephan Petzold
s.petzold@leeds.ac.uk
Tutor information is taken from the Module Catalogue

Core module textbook:

Mary Fulbrook (2015), A history of Germany, 1918-2008 : the divided nation, 4th edition, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.  

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SEMESTER 1: GERMANY 1870-1945

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Week 1: Introduction

Required reading

Neil MacGregor (2015), Deutschland : Erinnerungen einer Nation ISBN: 9783406679209, München: CH Beck, introduction.

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Week 2: The creation of a German nation-state, 1815-1871

Lecture research tasks

What were the main decisions of the Congress of Vienna and how did it affect Germany?

What was the Hambach festival and why did it matter?

Why did revolution break out in 1848 and what is the revolution’s historical significance?

Seminar questions

Wie kam es zur Gründung des deutschen Nationalstaats?

Welche Rolle spielte die Nationalbewegung bei der Reichsgründung?

War die Reichsgründung die Folge des preußischen Strebens nach mehr Macht?

Required reading

John Breuilly (2001), ‘Revolution to unification’, in: John Breuilly, ed, Nineteenth-century Germany : politics, culture and society 1780-1918, London: Bloomsbury, 138-158. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Further reading

Berger, Stefan (2004), Germany: Inventing the Nation, London: Arnold, ch. 2, 47-76. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Andreas Biefang (2017), 'The German National Association 1859-1867: Rise and Fall of a Proto-Party', in: Henk te Velde and Maartje Janse, eds, Organizing democracy : reflections on the rise of political organizations in the nineteenth century, Palgrave, 165-184.   

David Blackbourn (2003), History of Germany, 1780-1918 : the long nineteenth century, Oxford: Blackwell, 171-194.

Berit Elisabeth Dencker (2001), ‘Popular gymnastics and the military spirit in Germany, 1848-1871’, Central European history. ISSN: 0008-9389 34:4, 503-530.

Dieter Düding (1987), ‘The Nineteenth-Century German Nationalist Movement as a Movement of Societies’, in: Hagen Schulze, ed, Nation-building in Central Europe, Oxford: Berg, 19-50. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva  

Abigail Green (2004), ‘Political and diplomatic movements, 1850-1870. National movement, liberal movement, great-power struggles and the creation of the German Empire’, in: Jonathan Sperber, ed, Germany, 1800-1870 ISBN: 0199258376 (alk. paper); 0199258384 (pbk. : alk. paper), Oxford UP, 69-90. 

William Hagen (2012), German history in modern times : four lives of the nation, Cambridge University Press, ch. 8, 129-152. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Mark Hewitson (2010), ‘”The Old Forms Are Breaking Up,… Our New Germany Is Rebuilding Itself”: Constitutionalism, Nationalism and the Creation of a German Polity during the Revolutions of 1848-49’, English historical review. 125, 1173-1214.

Matthew Jefferies (2008), Contesting the German Empire, 1871-1918, Blackwell, 51-61.

Wolfgang Kruse (2012), ‚Äußere und innere Reichsgründung‘, Dossier Das Deutsche Kaiserreich, http://www.bpb.de/geschichte/deutsche-geschichte/kaiserreich/138914/aeussere-und-innere-reichsgruendung

Gordon Mork (1971), ‘Bismarck and the “Capitulation” of German Liberalism’, The journal of modern history. 43:1, 59-75.

Frank Lorenz Müller (2007), ‘The spectre of a people in arms: The Prussian government and the militarisation of German nationalism, 1859-1864’, English historical review. ISSN: 0013-8266 122, 82–103.

James Retallack (2017), ‘After the “German civil war” of 1866: building the state, embracing the nation’, in: Ute Planert and James Retallack, eds, Decades of reconstruction : postwar societies, state-building, and international relations from the Seven Years' War to the Cold War ISBN: 9781107165748 (hardback); 1107165741 (hardback); 9781316617083 (paperback); 1316617084 (paperback), Oxford UP. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva  

Hans-Ulrich Wehler (1975), Das deutsche Kaiserreich, 1871-1918, Oxford: Berg, ch. 1. OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (SRJ 13/10/2017)  

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Week 3: Imperial Germany: an authoritarian or a democratic political culture?

Lecture research tasks

What were the key institutions and characteristics of the constitution of 1871?

Who appointed the Reich Chancellor? Who is represented in the Bundestag?

What were the main parties in the Reichstag and who did they represent?

Seminar questions

Wie autoritär bzw. demokratisch war die Verfassung des Deutschen Reiches von 1981?

Wie versuchte das Kaiserreich die innere Einheit der neuen Nation herzustellen?

Inwieweit veränderte sich die politische Kultur des Kaiserreichs zwischen 1871 und 1900?

Required reading

Thomas Kühne (2008), ‘Political Culture and Democratization’, in: James Retallack, ed, Imperial Germany, 1871-1918, Oxford University Press, 174-195.

Further reading

Margaret Lavinia Anderson (1993), ‘Voter, Junker, Landrat, Priest: The Old Authorities and the New Franchise in Imperial Germany’, The American historical review. 98:5, 1448-1474.

Stefan Berger (2004), Germany: Inventing the Nation, London: Arnold, ch. 3.

David Blackbourn (2003), History of Germany, 1780-1918 : the long nineteenth century, Oxford: Blackwell, ch. 5, 195-203.

James Brophy (2016), '“The Modernity of Tradition”: Popular Culture and Protest in Nineteenth-Century Germany', in: Ilaria Favretto and Xabier Itcaina, eds, Protest, popular culture and tradition in modern and contemporary Western Europe ISBN: 1137507365 hardcover; 9781137507365 hardcover; 9781137507372 electronic book, Palgrave. 

Matthew Jefferies, ed (2015), The Ashgate research companion to imperial Germany, Ashgate, esp. part I and II.

Marcus Kreuzer (2003), ‘Parliamentarization and the Question of German Exceptionalism: 1867–1918’, Central European history. ISSN: 0008-9389 36:3, 327-357.

Thomas Kühne (2015), 'From Electoral Campaigning to the Politics of Togetherness: Localism and Democracy', in: David Blackbourn and James Retallack, eds, Localism, landscape, and the ambiguities of place : German-speaking central Europe, 1860-1930, University of Toronto Press, 101–123.   

Katherine Lerman (2001), ‘Bismarckian Germany and the structure of the German Empire’, in: John Breuilly, ed, Nineteenth-century Germany : politics, culture, and society 1780-1918, London: Bloomsbury, 163-184.

Wolfgang J. Mommsen (1995), ‘A Delaying Compromise? The Division of Authority in the German Constitution of 1871’, in: Imperial Germany 1867-1918 : politics, culture, and society in an authoritarian state, London: Arnold, 20-40.

James Retallack (2016), 'Mapping the Red Threat: The Politics of Exclusion in Leipzig before 1914', Central European history. ISSN: 0008-9389 49:3-4, 341-382.

James Retallack (2015), Germany's Second Reich : portraits and pathways ISBN: 9781442628526 (pbk.); 9781442650572 (bound : alk. paper); 1442650575 (bound : alk. paper); 1442628529 (pbk.), University of Toronto Press, ‘Get out the vote! Electioneering without democracy’, 237-257 Available online 

James Retallack (2017), Red Saxony : election battles and the spectre of democracy in Germany 1860-1918, Cambridge UP.

Helmut Walser Smith (1994), German nationalism and religious conflict : culture, ideology, politics, 1870-1914, Princeton University Press.

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Week 4: Germany's colonial empire: global entanglements and German identities

Lecture research tasks

What was Bismarck’s alliance system and what purposes did it serve?

Why did Germany seek an overseas colonial empire and what colonies did it have?

What was the Herero uprising?

Seminar questions

Warum versuchte das Kaiserreich ein Kolonialreich zu schaffen?

Wie beeinflusste das Kolonialreich das Selbstverständnis der deutschen Nation?

Required reading

Nancy Reagin (2001), ‘The Imagined Hausfrau: National Identity, Domesticity, and Colonialism in Imperial Germany’, The journal of modern history. 73, 54-86.

Further reading

Shelley Baranoskwi (2010), Nazi empire : German colonialism and imperialism from Bismarck to Hitler, Cambridge University Press.

Stefan Berger (2015), 'Building the Nation among Visions of German Empire', in: Stefan Berger and Alexei Miller, eds, Nationalizing empires ISBN: 9789633860168 (hardbound); 9633860164 (hardbound), Central European University Press, 247-308. OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (SRJ 13/10/2017) 

David Blackbourn (2003), History of Germany, 1780-1918 : the long nineteenth century, 249-254, 321-334 .

Sebastian Conrad (2013), ‘Rethinking German Colonialism in a Global Age’, The journal of imperial and commonwealth history. ISSN: 0308-6534 41:4, 543-566.

Sebastian Conrad (2011), German colonialism : a short history, Cambridge University Press, 21-35. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Bernhard Gissibl (2011), ‘Imagination and beyond: cultures and geographies of imperialism in Germany, 1848-1918’, in: John MacKenzie (ed): European empires and the people : popular responses to imperialism in France, Britain, the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and Italy, Manchester University Press, 158-187. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Janne Lahti (2016), ‘German Colonialism and the Age of Global Empires’, Journal of colonialism and colonial history. ISSN: 1532-5768 17:1.

Bradley Naranch and Geoff Eley, eds (2014), German colonialism in a global age, Duke University Press.

Michael Perraudin and Jürgen Zimmerer, eds (2010), German colonialism and national identity, London: Routledge.

John Short (2012), Magic lantern empire : colonialism and society in Germany, Cornell UP.

‘Forum: The German Colonial Imagination’, German history. 26:2 (2008), 251-271.

Thomas Kühne (2013), ‘Colonialism and the Holocaust: continuities, causations and complexities’, Journal of genocide research. ISSN: 1462-3528 15:3, 339-62.

Jürgen Zimmerer (2015), ‘Colonialism and Genocide’, in: Matthew Jefferies, ed (2015), The Ashgate research companion to imperial Germany, Ashgate, 433-453.   

Jürgen Zimmerer (2008), ‘War, Concentration Camps and Genocide in South-West Africa: The First German Genocide’, in: Jürgen Zimmerer and Joachim Zeller, eds, Genocide in German South-West Africa : the Colonial War (1904-1908) in Namibia and its aftermath, Monmouth: Merlin Press, 41-63. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva  

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Week 5: Defending of German Kultur? Mobilising for and experiencing World War I

Lecture research tasks

What was the Schlieffen Plan?

What were the main developments during the July Crisis 1914 that escalated into World War I?

What were the main battles of the war, who won them and how many died?

Seminar questions

Welche Verantwortung trug Deutschland für den Ausbruch des Ersten Weltkriegs?

Wie versuchten die Eliten die deutsche Gesellschaft für den Krieg zu mobilisieren?

Welchen Einfluss hatte der Krieg auf das Alltagsleben?

Required reading

Oliver Janz (2007), ‘Der Krieg als Opfergang und Katharsis: Gefallenenbriefe aus dem Ersten Weltkrieg’, in: Themenportal Europäische Geschichte, http://www.europa.clio-online.de/essay/id/artikel-3182 .

Belinda Davis (2002), ‘Food, Politics and Women’s Everyday Life during World War I’, in: Karen Hagemann and Stefanie Schüler-Springorum, eds, Home/front : the military, war, and gender in twentieth-century Germany, Oxford: Berg, 115-32.   

Further reading

Jeffrey Verhey (2008), ‘War and Revolution’, in: James Retallack, ed, Imperial Germany, 1871-1918, Oxford University Press, 242-263. 

David Blackbourn (2003), History of Germany, 1780-1918 : the long nineteenth century, 334-368.

Roger Chickering (2001), ‘The First World War’, in: John Breuilly, ed, Nineteenth-century Germany : politics, culture, and society 1780-1918, London: Bloomsbury, 248-267.

Roger Chickering (2004), Imperial Germany and the Great War, 1914-1918, Cambridge University Press.

Chris Clark, ‘Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914’, lecture at Gresham College, Oct 2014, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6snYQFcyiyg

Wilhelm Deist (1996), ‘The Military Collapse of the German Empire: The Reality Behind the Stab-in-the-Back Myth’, War in history. 3:2, 186-207.

Richard Hamilton and Holger Herwig (2005), Decisions for war, 1914-1917, Cambridge University Press, ch. 4.

Gerhard Hirschfeld (2011), ‘”The Spirit of 1914”: A Critical Examination of War Enthusiasm in German Society’, in: Lothar Kettenacker, Torsten Riotte, eds, The legacies of two World Wars : European societies in the twentieth century, Berghahn Books.

Robert L. Nelson (2004). ‘“Ordinary Men” in the First World War? German Soldiers as Victims and Participants’, Journal of contemporary history. ISSN: 0022-0094, 39:3, 425-435.

Erik Ringmar (2017), ‘The “spirit of 1914”: A redefinition and a defence’, War in history. ISSN: 0968-3445, online first.

Jeffrey Verhey (2008), ‘War and Revolution’, in: James Retallack, ed, Imperial Germany, 1871-1918 Oxford University Press, 242-263.

Jeffrey Verhey (2000), The spirit of 1914 : militarism, myth and mobilization in Germany, Cambridge UP.

Benjamin Ziemann (2007), War experiences in rural Germany, 1914-1923 ISBN: 9781845202453 (pbk.); 9781845202446 (cloth); 1845202449 (cloth); 1845202457 (pbk.), Berg.

Benjamin Ziemann (2017), Violence and the German soldier in the Great War : killing, dying, surviving, London: Bloomsbury.

Benjamin Ziemann (2011), ‘Germany 1914-1918: Total War as a Catalyst of Change’, in: Helmut Walser Smith, ed, The Oxford handbook of modern German history, Oxford UP, 378-99.

Wolfgang Kruse (2003), ‚Kriegsideologie und moderne Massenkultur‘, Dossier Erster Weltkrieg, http://www.bpb.de/geschichte/deutsche-geschichte/ersterweltkrieg/155308/kriegsideologie-und-moderne-massenkultur

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Week 6: The Weimar Republic: a German democracy between promise and crisis?

Lecture research tasks

What were ‘Spartakus’ and ‘Freikorps’? What political aims did they pursue?

What were the main provisions of the Weimar constitution of 1919?

What were the main stipulations of the Treaty of Versailles?

In what ways did the Weimar Republic experience its most serious crisis in 1923?

Seminar questions

Warum fiel es vielen Deutschen so schwer, die Niederlage im Ersten Weltkrieg zu akzeptieren?

Wie liberal und demokratisch war die Weimarer Republik?

War die Republik von Anfang an zum Scheitern verurteilt?

Required reading

Fulbrook, 15-30.

Further reading

Manuela Achilles (2010), ‘With a Passion for Reason: Celebrating the Constitution in Weimar Germany’, Central European history. 43:4, 666-689.

Manuela Achilles (2010), ‘Reforming the Reich. Democratic symbols and rituals in the Weimar Republic’, in: Kathleen Canning, Kerstin Barndt and Kristin McGuire, eds, Weimar publics/Weimar subjects : rethinking the political culture of Germany in the 1920s, Berghahn Books, 175-191

Manuela Achilles (2016), ‘Anchoring the Nation in the Democratic Form: Weimar Symbolic Politics beyond the Failure Paradigm’, in: Geoff Eley, Jennifer L. Jenkins and Tracie Matysik, eds, German modernities from Wilhelm to Weimar : a contest of futures, London: Bloomsbury, 259-28.   

Richard Bessel (1993), ‘The Legacy of the First World War and Weimar Politics’, in: Germany after the First World War, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 254-384. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Richard Evans (2003), The Coming of the Third Reich, London: Penguin, ‘The Weakness of Weimar’, 78-101.

Mark Jones (2017), ‘Violent reconstruction as shatterzones: the German revolution of 1918/19 and the foundation of the Weimar Republic’, in: Ute Planert and James Retallack, eds, Decades of reconstruction : postwar societies, state-building, and international relations from the Seven Years' War to the Cold War ISBN: 9781107165748 (hardback); 1107165741 (hardback); 9781316617083 (paperback); 1316617084 (paperback), Oxford UP. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Mark Jones (2016), Founding Weimar : violence and the German Revolution of 1918-1919 ISBN: 9781107115125 hardback; 1107115124 hardback, Cambridge UP.

Sally Marks (2013) ‘Mistakes and Myths: The Allies, Germany, and the Versailles Treaty, 1918–1921’, The journal of modern history. ISSN: 0022-2801; 1537-5358 85:3, 632-659.

Anthony McElligott (2014), Rethinking the Weimar republic : authority and authoritarianism, 1916-1936, London: Bloomsbury.

Thomas Mergel (2010), ‘High expectations – deep disappointments. Structures of the public perception of politics in the Weimar Republic’, in: Kathleen Canning, Kerstin Barndt and Kristin McGuire, eds, Weimar publics/Weimar subjects : rethinking the political culture of Germany in the 1920s ISBN: 9781845456894 (hbk.) : £58.00; 1845456890 (hbk.) : £58.00, Berghahn Books, 192-210,

Thomas Mergel (2007), ‘Das parlamentarische System von Weimar und die Folgelasten des Ersten Weltkriegs’, in: Andreas Wirsching, ed, Herausforderungen der parlamentarischen Demokratie : die Weimarer Republik im europäischen Vergleich, Munich: Oldenbourg, 37-59.

Horst Moeller (2012), Die Weimarer Republik : eine unvollendete Demokratie, Munich: dtv

Matthew Stibbe (2010), Germany, 1914-1933 : politics, society and culture ISBN: 9781405801362 (pbk.) : £16.99; 1405801360 (pbk.) : £16.99, London: Pearson, ‘Political and psychological consequences of the war‘, 67-97.

Colin Storer (2013), A short history of the Weimar Republic, London: IB Tauris, ch. 1.

George S. Vascik and Mark R. Sadler, eds (2016), The stab-in-the-back myth and the fall of the Weimar Republic : a history in documents and visual sources, Bloomsbury.

Klaus Weinhauer, Anthony McElligott, Kirsten Heinsohn, eds. (2015), Germany, 1916-23 : a revolution in context, Bielefeld: transcript.

Eric Weitz (2007), Weimar Germany : promise and tragedy, Princeton University Press, ch. 1.

Benjamin Ziemann (2012), Contested commemorations : republican war veterans and Weimar political culture, Cambridge UP

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Week 7: Reading week

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Week 8: The Weimar Republic in the ‘Golden Twenties’: a liberal, tolerant and vibrant culture?

Lecture research tasks

What was the historical significance of the Dawes Plan and the Treaty of Locarno?

What was Paul von Hindenburg’s role before and during the Weimar Republic?

What were the main political parties and who did they represent?

Seminar questions

Auf welche Weise war das kulturelle Leben der Weimarer Republik modern, vielfältig und lebendig?

Warum entwickelte sich aus diesem vielfältigen kulturellen Leben keine stärkere Zustimmung für die Weimarer Demokratie?

Required reading

Hendrik Thoß (2008), Demokratie ohne Demokraten? : die Innenpolitik der Weimarer Republik, Berlin: be.bra verlag, ch. 6 ‚Massenkultur und Zivilisationskritik‘, 112-123.

Optional: Fulbrook, 30-39.

Further reading

Karl-Christian Führer (1997), ‘A Medium of Modernity? Broadcasting in Weimar Germany, 1923-1932’, The journal of modern history. 69, 722-753.

Karl-Christian Führer (2009), ‘High brow and low brow culture’, in: Anthony McElligott, ed, Weimar Germany ISBN: 9780199280070 (pbk.) : £16.99; 9780199280063 (hbk.) : £50.00; 0199280061 (hbk.) : £50.00; 019928007X (pbk.) : £16.99, Oxford UP, 260-281. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Karl Christian Führer (1996), ‘Auf dem Weg zur “Massenkultur?” Kino und Rundfunk in der Weimarer Republik, Historische Zeitschrift. ISSN: 0018-2613; 2196-680X 262, 739-781.

Elizabeth Harvey (2001), ‘Culture and Society in Weimar Germany: the Impact of Modernisation and Mass Culture’, in: Mary Fulbrook, ed, Twentieth-century Germany : politics, culture and society 1918-1990, London: Arnold, 58-76.

Jochen Hung (2015), 'The modernized Gretchen: Transformations of the "New Women" in the late Weimar Republic', German history. ISSN: 0266-3554 33:1, 52-79.

Jochen Hung (2016), ‘“Bad” Politics and “Good” Culture: New Approaches to the History of the Weimar Republic’, Central European history. ISSN: 0008-9389 49:3-4, 441-453.

Jochen Hung, Godela Weiss-Sussex and Geoff Wilkes, eds (2012), Beyond glitter and doom : the contingency of the Weimar Republic ISBN: 9783862050840; 386205084X; 9780854572335, Munich: Iudicium.

Eberhard Kolb and Dirk Schumann (2013), Die Weimarer Republik ISBN: 9783486712674; 3486712675, 8th edition, Munich: Oldenbourg, 95-111.

Anthony McElligott, ed (2009), Weimar Germany ISBN: 9780199280070 (pbk.) : £16.99; 9780199280063 (hbk.) : £50.00; 0199280061 (hbk.) : £50.00; 019928007X (pbk.) : £16.99, Oxford UP, esp. chapters 5, 6, 8, 10.

Detlev Peukert (1991), The Weimar Republic: The Crisis of Classical Modernity, London: Allen Lane, ch. 8, 164-177. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

Corey Ross (2006), ‘Mass Culture and Divided Audiences: Cinema and Social Change in Inter-war Germany’, Past & present. 193, 157-95.

Adelheid von Saldern (2004), ‘Volk und Heimat Culture in Radio Broadcasting during the Period of Transition from Weimar to Nazi Germany, The journal of modern history. ISSN: 0022-2801; 1537-5358 76:2, 312-346.

Matthew Stibbe (2010), Germany, 1914-1933 : politics, society and culture, Pearson, ch. 5.

Colin Storer (2013), A short history of the Weimar Republic, London: IB Tauris, ch. 5.

J. A. Williams, ed (2011), Weimar culture revisited, New York: Palgrave.

Eric Weitz (2007), Weimar Germany : promise and tragedy, Princeton University Press.

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Week 9: The rise of the Nazis and the collapse of the Weimar Republic

Lecture research tasks

What were the key events in the history of the NSDAP during the 1920s?

What were the main political developments in Weimar Germany during 1932?

What measures did the Nazis take to consolidate their power in the first half of 1933?

Seminar questions

Wie schaffte es die NSDAP sich als eine ernstzunehmende politische Kraft zu etablieren?

Warum war die Weimarer Republik nicht stabil genug der Herausforderung durch die Nationalsozialisten standzuhalten?

Wie festigten die Nationalsozialisten ihre Macht in den ersten eineinhalb Jahren ihrer Herrschaft?

Required reading

Michael Wildt (2008), Geschichte des Nationalsozialismus ISBN: 9783825229146 (UTB); 3825229149; 9783525037102 (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht); 3525037104, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 66-87.

optional: Fulbrook, 40-63, pp. 40-52 strongly recommended (events not covered in Wildt)

Further reading

William Brustein and Jürgen W. Falter (1995), ‘Who Joined the Nazi Party? Assessing Theories of the Social Origins of Nazism’, Zeitgeschichte 22:3-4, 83-108. OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (SRJ 13/10/2017) 

Hermann Beck (2009), The fateful alliance : German conservatives and Nazis in 1933 : the Machtergreifung in a new light, Berghahn Books.

Peter Fritzsche (2008), ‘The NSDAP 1919-1934. From Fringe Politics to the Seizure of Power’, in: Jane Caplan, ed, Nazi Germany, Oxford University Press, 48-72.

Peter Fritzsche (1996), ‘Did Weimar Fail? ’, The journal of modern history. 68, 629-656.

Peter Fritzsche (2017), 'The Role of 'the People' and the Rise of the Nazis', in: John Abromeit, York Norman, Gary Marotta, Bridget Maria Chesterton, eds, Transformations of populism in Europe and the Americas : history and recent tendencies) , London: Bloomsbury. 

Larry Eugene Jones (2014), The German right in the Weimar Republic : studies in the history of German conservatism, nationalism, and antisemitism, Berghahn Books.

Larry Eugen Jones (2016), Hitler versus Hindenburg : the 1932 presidential elections and the end of the Weimar Republic, Cambridge UP.

Ian Kershaw, ed (1990), Weimar: why did German democracy fail?, London: Weidenfeld.

Matthew Stibbe (2010), Germany, 1914-1933 : politics, society and culture, Pearson, ch. 6.

Colin Storer (2013), A short history of the Weimar Republic, London: IB Tauris, ch. 6.

Jill Stephenson (2001), ‘The Rise of the Nazis: Sonderweg or Spanner in the Works? ’, in: Mary Fulbrook, ed, Twentieth-century Germany : politics, culture and society 1918-1990, London: Arnold, 77-98. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva

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Week 10: Nazi society: creating the Volksgemeinschaft

Lecture research tasks

What measures did the Nazis use to increasingly exclude Jews in the 1930s?

What were the main institutions of the Nazi terror system?

What were the main mass organisations in Nazi Germany and what was their purpose?

Seminar questions

Wie versuchten die Nationalsozialisten die von ihnen idealisierte ‚Volksgemeinschaft‘ zu erreichen?

Wurden normale Deutsche gezwungen sich konform zu verhalten oder beteiligten sie sich aktiv an der Gestaltung der nationalsozialistischen Gesellschaft?

Required reading

Fulbrook, 63-79.

Robert Gellately (2001), Backing Hitler : consent and coercion in Nazi Germany, Oxford University Press, 1-9.

Further reading

Frank Bajohr and Michael Wildt, eds (2012), Volksgemeinschaft : neue Forschungen zur Gesellschaft des Nationalsozialismus, 2nd ed., Frankfurt: Fischer.

Geoff Eley (2003), ‘Hitler’s Silent Majority? Conformity and Resistance under the Third Reich’, The Michigan quarterly review. 42:2, http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.act2080.0042.223

Richard J. Evans (2007), ‘Coercion and Consent in Nazi Germany’, Proceedings of the British Academy. ISSN: 0068-1202 151, 53-81. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva 

Peter Fritzsche (2008), Life and death in the Third Reich, Harvard University Press, esp. ch 1. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva  

Peter Fritzsche (1994), ‘Where Did All the Nazis Go? Reflections on Collaboration and Resistance‘, Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte 23, 191-214. OCR REQUESTED BY LIBRARY (SRJ 13/10/2017) 

Robert Gellately (2005), ‘Social Outsiders and the Consolidation of Hitler’s Dictatorship, 1933-1939’, in: Neil Gregor, ed, Nazism, war and genocide : essays in honour of Jeremy Noakes ISBN: 0859897451 (hbk), University of Exeter Press, 56-74. Available as an Online Course Reading in Minerva  

Ian Kershaw (1993), ‘”Working towards the Führer”: Reflections on the Nature of the Hitler Dictatorship’, Contemporary European history 2:2, 103-118.

Ian Kershaw (2009), 'Consensus, Coercion and Popular Opinion in the Third Reich: Some Reflections', in: Paul Corner, ed, Popular opinion in totalitarian regimes : fascism, Nazism, communism, Oxford UP.   

Peter Lambert (2016), ‘The Third Reich: Police State or Self-Policing Society?’, in: Alf Lüdkte, ed, Everyday life in mass dictatorship : collusion and evasion ISBN: 9781137442765; 113744276X, London: Palgrave, 37-54.   

Lisa Pine, ed (2016), Life and times in Nazi Germany ISBN: 9781474217934 hardback £70.00; 9781474217927 paperback £22.99; 9781474217941 (epdf); 147421794X (epdf), London: Bloomsbury.

Lisa Pine (2017), Hitler's "national community" : society and culture in Nazi Germany ISBN: 9781474238816 (hardback); 1474238815 (hardback); 9781474238779 (paperback); 1474238777 (paperback), London: Bloomsbury.

Detlef Schmiechen-Ackermann, ed (2012), 'Volksgemeinschaft' : Mythos, wirkungsmächtige soziale Verheissung oder soziale Realität im 'Dritten Reich'? : Zwischenbilanz einer kontroversen Debatte, Paderborn: Schöningh.

Susanna Schrafstetter and Alan E. Steinweis, ed (2015), The Germans and the Holocaust : popular responses to the persecution and murder of the Jews ISBN: 9781782389521 (hardback : alk. paper); 9781782389538 (ebook), Berghahn Book.

Martina Steber and Bernhard Gott, eds (2014), Visions of community in Nazi Germany : social engineering and private lives ISBN: 9780199689590 (hbk.) : £65.00, Oxford University Press

Jill Stephenson (2016), 'The Volksgemeinschaft and the Problems of Permeability: The Persistence of Traditional Attitudes in Württemberg villages', German history. ISSN: 0266-3554 34:1, 49-69.

Jill Stephenson (2008), ‘Inclusion: Building the National Community in Propaganda and Practice’, in: Jane Caplan, ed, Nazi Germany, Oxford University Press, 99-121.

‘Forum: Everyday Life in Nazi Germany’, German history. 27 (2009), 560-579.

David Welch (1993), ‘Manufacturing a Consensus. Nazi Propaganda and the Building of a “National Community” ( Volksgemeinschaft )’, Contemporary European history. 2:1, 1-15.

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Week 11: The Holocaust

Lecture research tasks

What were Einsatzgruppen and what role did they play in the Holocaust?

What was the Madagascar Plan?

What was the significance of the Wannsee Conference 1942?

What and where were the Nazi extermination camps?

Seminar questions

Warum gingen die Nationalsozialisten von Ausschluss und Verfolgung der Juden zu ihrer systematischen Vernichtung über?

Wie viel wusste die deutsche Bevölkerung über den Massenmord an den Juden?

Required reading

Fulbrook, 80-105.

Bernward Dörner (2014), 'Was wussten die Deutschen vom Völkermord an den Juden?', in: Harald Roth, ed, Was hat der Holocaust mit mir zu tun? : 37 Antworten ISBN: 9783570552032 (pbk.); 3570552039 (pbk.), München: Pantheon, 57-64.

Further reading

Nicholas Stargardt (2001), ‘The “final solution”’, in: Mary Fulbrook, ed, Twentieth-century Germany : politics, culture and society 1918-1990, London: Arnold, 149-173.

Frank Bajohr and Dieter Pohl (2008), Massenmord und schlechtes Gewissen : die deutsche Bevölkerung, die NS-Führung und der Holocaust, Frankfurt: Fischer-Verlag.

Frank Bajohr and Andrea Löw, eds (2015), Der Holocaust : Ergebnisse und neue Fragen der Forschung, Frankfurt: Fischer-Verlag.

Frank Bajohr (2006), ‘The “Folk Community” and the Persecution of the Jews: German Society under National Socialist Dictatorship’, Holocaust and Genocide Studies 20, 183-206.

Christopher Browning (1992), Ordinary men : Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the final solution in Poland, London: Harper Collins.

Saul Friedländer (2007), The years of extermination : Nazi Germany and the Jews 1939-1945 London: HarperCollins.

Peter Fritzsche (2008), Life and death in the Third Reich, Harvard University Press.

Christian Gerlach (2015), The extermination of the European Jews ISBN: 9780521706896 (paperback); 9780521880787 (hardback), Cambridge UP.

Beth A. Griech-Polelle (2017), Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust : language, rhetoric, and the traditions of hatred, London: Bloomsbury.

Marion Kaplan (1998), Between dignity and despair : Jewish life in Nazi Germany, Oxford UP.

Peter Longerich (2010), Holocaust : the Nazi persecution and murder of the Jews, Oxford University Press.

Peter Longerich (2009), "Davon haben wir nichts gewusst!" : die Deutschen und die Judenverfolgung, 1933-1945, Berlin: Siedler.

Mark Roseman (2010), ‘Holocaust Perpetrators in Victims’ Eyes’, in: Paul Betts and Christian Wiese, eds, Years of persecution, years of extermination : Saul Friedlander and the future of Holocaust studies, London: Bloomsbury, 81-100.

Nicholas Stargardt (2015), The German war : a nation under arms, 1939-45, Bodley Head.

Nicholas Stargardt (2010), ‘Speaking in Public about the Murder of the Jews: What did the Holocaust Mean to the Germans?’, in: Paul Betts and Christian Wiese, eds, Years of persecution, years of extermination : Saul Friedlander and the future of Holocaust studies ISBN: 9781441129871 (pbk.) : £22.99; 9781441189370 (hbk.) : £60.00; 1441189378 (hbk.) : £60.00; 1441129871 (pbk.) : £22.99, London: Bloomsbury, 133-154.

This list was last updated on 25/09/2017